Mastering the Requirements Process

Mastering the Requirements Process

by Suzanne Robertson, James C. Robertson
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Mastering the Requirements Process 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Susanne Maloney Robertson is not a professional writer/author and, she will be the first to admit that therefore, Suzanne should not be criticized for her writing. What Susanne wrote was from the heart and her experiences growing up at St. Colman's Home. I know for a fact, much of what Susanne divulged in her book is true. Regarding Susanne's treatment by Sister Regina and Katharine F.: this is something that could possibly have happened however, unless verified by others, only they know. Treatment of children at St. Colman's was selective. There were those children who could do no wrong. There were those children who could do no right. And...if you were in the 'could do no right category' you had better watch out!!! Many will believe Susanne. Many will not believe. What I am saying is 'If You Only Knew....' Susanne may never forgive and she definitely will not forget - my hope is that Susanne has found some peace in her heart and, I hope she is now leading a happy life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
[A review of the SECOND EDITION, 2006.] The main context of this book is for software projects. If you are reading these words, you probably hail from that environment. But the authors do explain that the processes they describe are applicable to almost any project. This is not a software book, per se. Not a line of code appears here, as far as I can tell. Most programmers know that design is important, and should usually precede any coding. The book's contribution is about that design and its prelude. Namely the gathering and determination of what the requirements might be. The authors point out that this makes the book in no small part a sociological text. About how to get a group of people together, and to solicit their contributions and perceptions into the project's requirements. Managing the dynamics of this is the purview of sociology [and psychology]. Without a solid performance here, subsequent design and coding may rest on quicksand. The book does acknowledge that recent technological innovations like blogs and wikis can lead to quicker feedback. And hence contribute to a more interactive and iterative scenario of updating requirements as the project proceeds. All in the Agile spirit that many teams are now using. Just remember that the blogs and wikis are not a substitute for physically getting the team together. Much of the dynamics and feedback in the processes given by the book do really require that physical presence, to enhance the members' contributions.