Materials for Engineering: Concepts and Applications

Materials for Engineering: Concepts and Applications

by Lawrence H. Van Vlack

Hardcover

$66.67

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780201080650
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Publication date: 05/28/1982
Pages: 604
Product dimensions: 7.72(w) x 9.58(h) x 1.20(d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE: PREFACE
There are multiple dimensions to all technical subjects. This is particularly true in the field of Materials Science and Engineering where the range of academic sophistication extends from descriptive to highly quantitative; where the focus can be on the science side, in the engineering arena, or at any location along the intervening spectrum; and where the attention may be specifically in one technical field, such as structures or electronic devices, or broadly across all technology.

Like the textbook Elements of Materials Science and Engineering, this textbook follows College Chemistry and General Physics. It is recommended that it precede courses in engineering design. Thus, it is aimed for the 3rd-to-5th semester student.

In contrast to the above text, the focus of this book is located further toward the engineering region of the science-engineering spectrum. Thus, there is more emphasis on applications. The science, or the "why" of behavior, is used where necessary but does not form the outline of the text. This has brought about significant differences in organization. Metals are presented first because their property-structure-performance relationships are more easily presented than for polymers and ceramics, which come later. The introductory concepts of processing are presented as additional units for each of the above material groups. Separate unites are included for some of the widely encountered materials--Steel and Iron (6), Wood (10), Glass (13), and Construction Materials (15). Their use is optional with the instructor. Units have been included for specific types of applications; for example, where strength,toughness, etc., are critical (Unit 14), when hostile environments must be met (Unit 16), or where electrical properties are prime (Units 17, 18, 19). Here again the instructor has the option of including or skipping the units according to local needs.

As just indicated, this text has been written for more flexible use than was Elements of Materials Science and Engineering. There has long been an expressed desire for a modular approach to the teaching of Materials Science and Engineering, so that the instructor could tailor a course to the local constraints that exist in time, audience, etc. The national effort to this end, EMMSE (with which I have been associated), is rapidly accumulating modules for this purpose. However, it is apparent that those modules are most effective for second-level and advanced-level courses. In fact, with only a few exceptions, it is now assumed that those modules will not be used in introductory materials courses. This textbook attempts to fill that gap. It is written so that the instructor may choose from 20 units those that fulfill the local specifications for an introductory materials course. This has meant that the units in this text must be more self-standing than chapters in a normal text. At the same time, however, the units are coordinated to avoid redundancy and to provide support where necessary.

The final unit (20) in this book bears special comment. Over the past decade there has been an emerging realization the engineer must view Materials more broadly than solely their science and technology. The last unit gives the instructor an opportunity to "open the door" so that the student may have a glimpse at the broad interface between Materials and Society. Admittedly, it is a preview only, but one that many feel should be introduced as early as possible.

Several features have been included in this textbook to facilitate the learning process. Each unit has its own introduction, outline, and stated objectives for the student. The principal prerequisites are cited. Each unit is followed by a Review and Study section that includes a Summary, a glossary of new Technical Terms, a set of Checks for student use, and Study Problems for home assignment.

The engineer must solve problems. Therefore, it is natural that some technical concepts are more easily illustrated by a calculation than by verbage in a paragraph. To this end, the units include Illustrative Problems where additional information may be presented. The students should include these I.P.'s in their study and not consider them solely as examples to mimic when they are given home assignments. Problem-solving abilities are achieved progressively. The first encounter is to observe someone else's solution. The I.P.'s can serve this initial stage. In a second stage, there is a place for "equation-plugging" or for the mimicking of existing solutions. Study Problems of this nature are found at the end of each unit. Those Study Problems that require more analysis and synthesis by the student are identified with a vertical rule. Of course the engineering student should reach this stage in the process of mastering a subject.

SI units are the primary dimensional mode in this text. However, English Units are used parenthetically where such dimensions persist in practice, since the engineer will continue to profit by being able to communicate with those individuals who have a wealth of experience in that mode.

Students at the University of Michigan have made a major contribution to this text, because the classroom has been its development laboratory. They deserve a special thanks from me, and also, I am certain, from the future students who will be using this text. Several of the units have benefited through extensive suggestions and criticisms of experts in related materials fields. These are: Unit 10, "Wood," that was critiqued by Dr. G. Marra, on leave from Washington State to the U.S. Forest Productions Laboratory; Unit 13, "Glass and Vitreous Products," Dr. H. R. Swift of LOF Glass; Unit 15, "Concrete and Materials of Construction," Prof. E. Tons, P.E., The University of Michigan; and Unit 20, Section 4, "Failure Analysis," Prof. W. Larson, Iowa State University. Each is to be sincerely thanked. In addition, I wish to acknowledge the input of my Ann Arbor colleagues, the encouragement of Prof. M. Cohen, plus the help beyond the call of duty by Ardis Vukas, Marion Howe, Dick Morton, and Tom Robbins.

Ann Arbor, Michigan
October 1981

Table of Contents

PREFACE: PREFACE
There are multiple dimensions to all technical subjects. This is particularly true in the field of Materials Science and Engineering where the range of academic sophistication extends from descriptive to highly quantitative; where the focus can be on the science side, in the engineering arena, or at any location along the intervening spectrum; and where the attention may be specifically in one technical field, such as structures or electronic devices, or broadly across all technology.

Like the textbook Elements of Materials Science and Engineering, this textbook follows College Chemistry and General Physics. It is recommended that it precede courses in engineering design. Thus, it is aimed for the 3rd-to-5th semester student.

In contrast to the above text, the focus of this book is located further toward the engineering region of the science-engineering spectrum. Thus, there is more emphasis on applications. The science, or the "why" of behavior, is used where necessary but does not form the outline of the text. This has brought about significant differences in organization. Metals are presented first because their property-structure-performance relationships are more easily presented than for polymers and ceramics, which come later. The introductory concepts of processing are presented as additional units for each of the above material groups. Separate unites are included for some of the widely encountered materials--Steel and Iron (6), Wood (10), Glass (13), and Construction Materials (15). Their use is optional with the instructor. Units have been included for specific types of applications; for example, where strength,toughness,etc., are critical (Unit 14), when hostile environments must be met (Unit 16), or where electrical properties are prime (Units 17, 18, 19). Here again the instructor has the option of including or skipping the units according to local needs.

As just indicated, this text has been written for more flexible use than was Elements of Materials Science and Engineering. There has long been an expressed desire for a modular approach to the teaching of Materials Science and Engineering, so that the instructor could tailor a course to the local constraints that exist in time, audience, etc. The national effort to this end, EMMSE (with which I have been associated), is rapidly accumulating modules for this purpose. However, it is apparent that those modules are most effective for second-level and advanced-level courses. In fact, with only a few exceptions, it is now assumed that those modules will not be used in introductory materials courses. This textbook attempts to fill that gap. It is written so that the instructor may choose from 20 units those that fulfill the local specifications for an introductory materials course. This has meant that the units in this text must be more self-standing than chapters in a normal text. At the same time, however, the units are coordinated to avoid redundancy and to provide support where necessary.

The final unit (20) in this book bears special comment. Over the past decade there has been an emerging realization the engineer must view Materials more broadly than solely their science and technology. The last unit gives the instructor an opportunity to "open the door" so that the student may have a glimpse at the broad interface between Materials and Society. Admittedly, it is a preview only, but one that many feel should be introduced as early as possible.

Several features have been included in this textbook to facilitate the learning process. Each unit has its own introduction, outline, and stated objectives for the student. The principal prerequisites are cited. Each unit is followed by a Review and Study section that includes a Summary, a glossary of new Technical Terms, a set of Checks for student use, and Study Problems for home assignment.

The engineer must solve problems. Therefore, it is natural that some technical concepts are more easily illustrated by a calculation than by verbage in a paragraph. To this end, the units include Illustrative Problems where additional information may be presented. The students should include these I.P.'s in their study and not consider them solely as examples to mimic when they are given home assignments. Problem-solving abilities are achieved progressively. The first encounter is to observe someone else's solution. The I.P.'s can serve this initial stage. In a second stage, there is a place for "equation-plugging" or for the mimicking of existing solutions. Study Problems of this nature are found at the end of each unit. Those Study Problems that require more analysis and synthesis by the student are identified with a vertical rule. Of course the engineering student should reach this stage in the process of mastering a subject.

SI units are the primary dimensional mode in this text. However, English Units are used parenthetically where such dimensions persist in practice, since the engineer will continue to profit by being able to communicate with those individuals who have a wealth of experience in that mode.

Students at the University of Michigan have made a major contribution to this text, because the classroom has been its development laboratory. They deserve a special thanks from me, and also, I am certain, from the future students who will be using this text. Several of the units have benefited through extensive suggestions and criticisms of experts in related materials fields. These are: Unit 10, "Wood," that was critiqued by Dr. G. Marra, on leave from Washington State to the U.S. Forest Productions Laboratory; Unit 13, "Glass and Vitreous Products," Dr. H. R. Swift of LOF Glass; Unit 15, "Concrete and Materials of Construction," Prof. E. Tons, P.E., The University of Michigan; and Unit 20, Section 4, "Failure Analysis," Prof. W. Larson, Iowa State University. Each is to be sincerely thanked. In addition, I wish to acknowledge the input of my Ann Arbor colleagues, the encouragement of Prof. M. Cohen, plus the help beyond the call of duty by Ardis Vukas, Marion Howe, Dick Morton, and Tom Robbins.

Ann Arbor, Michigan
October 1981

Preface

PREFACE: PREFACE
There are multiple dimensions to all technical subjects. This is particularly true in the field of Materials Science and Engineering where the range of academic sophistication extends from descriptive to highly quantitative; where the focus can be on the science side, in the engineering arena, or at any location along the intervening spectrum; and where the attention may be specifically in one technical field, such as structures or electronic devices, or broadly across all technology.

Like the textbook Elements of Materials Science and Engineering, this textbook follows College Chemistry and General Physics. It is recommended that it precede courses in engineering design. Thus, it is aimed for the 3rd-to-5th semester student.

In contrast to the above text, the focus of this book is located further toward the engineering region of the science-engineering spectrum. Thus, there is more emphasis on applications. The science, or the "why" of behavior, is used where necessary but does not form the outline of the text. This has brought about significant differences in organization. Metals are presented first because their property-structure-performance relationships are more easily presented than for polymers and ceramics, which come later. The introductory concepts of processing are presented as additional units for each of the above material groups. Separate unites are included for some of the widely encountered materials--Steel and Iron (6), Wood (10), Glass (13), and Construction Materials (15). Their use is optional with the instructor. Units have been included for specific types of applications; for example, wherestrength,toughness, etc., are critical (Unit 14), when hostile environments must be met (Unit 16), or where electrical properties are prime (Units 17, 18, 19). Here again the instructor has the option of including or skipping the units according to local needs.

As just indicated, this text has been written for more flexible use than was Elements of Materials Science and Engineering. There has long been an expressed desire for a modular approach to the teaching of Materials Science and Engineering, so that the instructor could tailor a course to the local constraints that exist in time, audience, etc. The national effort to this end, EMMSE (with which I have been associated), is rapidly accumulating modules for this purpose. However, it is apparent that those modules are most effective for second-level and advanced-level courses. In fact, with only a few exceptions, it is now assumed that those modules will not be used in introductory materials courses. This textbook attempts to fill that gap. It is written so that the instructor may choose from 20 units those that fulfill the local specifications for an introductory materials course. This has meant that the units in this text must be more self-standing than chapters in a normal text. At the same time, however, the units are coordinated to avoid redundancy and to provide support where necessary.

The final unit (20) in this book bears special comment. Over the past decade there has been an emerging realization the engineer must view Materials more broadly than solely their science and technology. The last unit gives the instructor an opportunity to "open the door" so that the student may have a glimpse at the broad interface between Materials and Society. Admittedly, it is a preview only, but one that many feel should be introduced as early as possible.

Several features have been included in this textbook to facilitate the learning process. Each unit has its own introduction, outline, and stated objectives for the student. The principal prerequisites are cited. Each unit is followed by a Review and Study section that includes a Summary, a glossary of new Technical Terms, a set of Checks for student use, and Study Problems for home assignment.

The engineer must solve problems. Therefore, it is natural that some technical concepts are more easily illustrated by a calculation than by verbage in a paragraph. To this end, the units include Illustrative Problems where additional information may be presented. The students should include these I.P.'s in their study and not consider them solely as examples to mimic when they are given home assignments. Problem-solving abilities are achieved progressively. The first encounter is to observe someone else's solution. The I.P.'s can serve this initial stage. In a second stage, there is a place for "equation-plugging" or for the mimicking of existing solutions. Study Problems of this nature are found at the end of each unit. Those Study Problems that require more analysis and synthesis by the student are identified with a vertical rule. Of course the engineering student should reach this stage in the process of mastering a subject.

SI units are the primary dimensional mode in this text. However, English Units are used parenthetically where such dimensions persist in practice, since the engineer will continue to profit by being able to communicate with those individuals who have a wealth of experience in that mode.

Students at the University of Michigan have made a major contribution to this text, because the classroom has been its development laboratory. They deserve a special thanks from me, and also, I am certain, from the future students who will be using this text. Several of the units have benefited through extensive suggestions and criticisms of experts in related materials fields. These are: Unit 10, "Wood," that was critiqued by Dr. G. Marra, on leave from Washington State to the U.S. Forest Productions Laboratory; Unit 13, "Glass and Vitreous Products," Dr. H. R. Swift of LOF Glass; Unit 15, "Concrete and Materials of Construction," Prof. E. Tons, P.E., The University of Michigan; and Unit 20, Section 4, "Failure Analysis," Prof. W. Larson, Iowa State University. Each is to be sincerely thanked. In addition, I wish to acknowledge the input of my Ann Arbor colleagues, the encouragement of Prof. M. Cohen, plus the help beyond the call of duty by Ardis Vukas, Marion Howe, Dick Morton, and Tom Robbins.

Ann Arbor, Michigan
October 1981

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