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Max Said Yes!: The Woodstock Story
     

Max Said Yes!: The Woodstock Story

by Abigail Yasgur, Barbara Mendes (Illustrator), Joseph Lipner
 

With lively verse and illustrations reminiscent of the era's album covers, this tale commemorates the historic three-day music festival that became a symbol of the peace and love mantras of an entire generation: Woodstock. Dairy farmer Max Yasgur made rock ’n’ roll history when he allowed a group of flower children to gather on his farm.

Overview

With lively verse and illustrations reminiscent of the era's album covers, this tale commemorates the historic three-day music festival that became a symbol of the peace and love mantras of an entire generation: Woodstock. Dairy farmer Max Yasgur made rock ’n’ roll history when he allowed a group of flower children to gather on his farm. Thousands from across the land flocked to listen to the rock groups of the day—the Grateful Dead, Richie Havens, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Santana. They pitched a tent village, danced joyfully in front of the giant stage blasting music celebrating the Aquarian age; and when it was over, they set out to rebuild the universe.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This picture book in rhyme is delightful. The meter never loses its beat as it delivers the philosophy of the man who proved one person can make a difference. A sound end note affirms music and peace were here 'gigantic, messy and wonderful.'"  —Association of Jewish Libraries

"I was enthralled with this rendition of the Woodstock story and read it several times. It was probably no mean feat to recreate this story in rhyme, but it was very well done. The vibrant, colorful artwork was very appealing. Together they captured the spirit of the Woodstock Music & Art Fair (Woodstock)."  —Deb Fowler Round Table Reviews

"Lets the light of Woodstock shine on a new generation."  —Richie Havens, guitarist

"A giant celebration of the Woodstock nation. Yasgur and Lipner's book is a jubilant reminder of Max Yasgur's generosity."  —Naomi Howland, children's book author and illustrator

"A good way to introduce little children to the most positive cultural event of the century—the 1969 Woodstock Festival."  —Elliott Landy, official photographer of Woodstock

"A beautifully sanitized version of Woodstock for the newest generation. The words are rhythmic, rhyming, and peaceful—if not entirely accurate—and the fanciful illustrations by Underground Comix's Barbara 'Willy' Mendes tell as much of the history as the text."  —Sacramento Book Review

Association of Jewish Libraries
This picture book in rhyme is delightful. The meter never loses its beat as it delivers the philosophy of the man who proved one person can make a difference. A sound end note affirms music and peace were here "gigantic, messy and wonderful."
Deb Fowler
I was enthralled with this rendition of the Woodstock story and read it several times. It was probably no mean feat to recreate this story in rhyme, but it was very well done. The vibrant, colorful artwork was very appealing. Together they captured the spirit of the Woodstock Music & Art Fair.
Round Table Reviews
Sacramento Book Review
A beautifully sanitized version of Woodstock for the newest generation. The words are rhythmic, rhyming, and peaceful-if not entirely accurate-and the fanciful illustrations by Underground Comix's Barbara 'Willy' Mendes tell as much of the history as the text.
Children's Literature - Jennifer Lehmann
To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Woodstock music festival, Abigail Yasgur and Joseph Lipner decided to use a new approach, namely developing a picture book that would introduce the event to a new generation. The focus is on Max Yasgur, the farmer who allowed the festival to be held on his land. The central message of the book is his courage in saying "Yes" in the face of opposition. In addition, the book focuses on the message of peace and acceptance celebrated by the festival. The illustrations are attractive and evocative of the time period. The rich details encourage long explorations. The story neatly avoids the less family-friendly aspects of Woodstock. For the most part, the vocabulary is appropriate for small children. The rhyme and rhythm are engaging, if occasionally uneven. However, some aspects of the tale seem out of touch. For example, the text refers to the reader's mom and dad as those who were a part of the Woodstock generation several times, yet the book is aimed at young children whose parents are probably too young to have been present. It also refers to the attendees as "boys and girls," but they would seem to be older than such terms imply to modern readers. Still, for those who cherish memories and ideas of Woodstock, this could be an appealing way to pass them on. Reviewer: Jennifer Lehmann

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780615211442
Publisher:
Change the Universe Press
Publication date:
06/01/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
915,563
Product dimensions:
11.10(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

What People are Saying About This

Elliott Landy
A good way to introduce little children to the most positive cultural event of the century-the 1969 Woodstock Festival. (Elliott Landy, official photographer of Woodstock)
Naomi Howland
A giant celebration of the Woodstock nation. Yasgur and Lipner's book is a jubilant reminder of Max Yasgur's generosity. (Naomi Howland, children's book author and illustrator)
Richie Havens
Lets the light of Woodstock shine on a new generation.

Meet the Author

Abigail Yasgur is a cousin of Max Yasgur and a library director. Joseph Lipner is an attorney and a writer. Barbara Mendes is an artist. They all live in Los Angeles.

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