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Me, Myself & Food: Conquering The Struggle Against Overweight And Obesity Without Dieting
     

Me, Myself & Food: Conquering The Struggle Against Overweight And Obesity Without Dieting

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by Diana Hunter
 

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Me, Myself & Food: Conquering The Struggle Against Overweight And Obesity Without Dieting by award-winning author and nutrition researcher Diana Hunter is a concise and conveniently sized (5 x 7) paperback that provides a frank and informative "outside the box" look at the causes of weight gain and how to easily and effectively deal with them once and for all.

Overview

Me, Myself & Food: Conquering The Struggle Against Overweight And Obesity Without Dieting by award-winning author and nutrition researcher Diana Hunter is a concise and conveniently sized (5 x 7) paperback that provides a frank and informative "outside the box" look at the causes of weight gain and how to easily and effectively deal with them once and for all. Hunter's approach is simple, yet highly informative, providing much-needed information on this escalating national issue with a combination of wit, personal anecdotes, and solutions.

Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
Food is awesome, and that is the problem many see as they seek better health. "Me, Myself, & Food: Conquering the Struggle Against Overweight and Obesity Without Dieting" is a guide to creating a lifestyle around food that fights obesity and promotes a healthy lifestyle. Encouraging good practices that help find a healthier weight, the importance of willpower, tips on good habits for success and how to avoid the failure, and adjusting for a life time, "Me, Myself, & Food" is a strong addition to health and wellness collections, not to be missed.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781891264689
Publisher:
Consumer Press
Publication date:
12/20/2012
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.20(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 4
Having a solid understanding of nutrition is second only to truly caring about yourself in your quest for effective weight loss and management. Like working with a computer program in which you need to know the codes in order to run it effectively, you need to know your body's codes in terms of foods and nutrients. It's not only essential, but worth the effort. And while it may seem challenging and confusing, it's really not as bad as it seems. It can even make for some pretty interesting conversation. Here are some important basic tips to get you started:

• The recommended total daily fiber intake for healthy adults up to age 50 is 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men (about 14 grams per thousand calories ingested). For healthy adults over 50 the daily amount is 21 grams for women and 30 grams for men.
• Foods high in fiber include pears, raspberries, popcorn, pistachios, whole grains, berries, oat bran, lentils, peas, and beans.
• The iron found in iron skillets can be absorbed by the body through foods. Women lose iron; men store it. Too much can make you sick. Cooking beef liver in an iron pan is a double-whammy dose.
• According to the CDC, iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the United States.
• According to the National Institutes of Health, vitamin B12 deficiency affects between 1.5% and 15% of the public; afflicting mainly those who are elderly, alcoholic, have digestive disorders such as Crohn's disease or celiac disease, or are vegetarians or vegans.

Note: A deficiency of this vitamin can cause irreversible nerve damage.

• Mango skins and cashew shells contain urushiol, the same toxic substance common to poison ivy, oak, and sumac. (Ever wonder why you never see cashews for sale in the shell?)
• Conventional bagels are very high in carbs. Especially important info to know if you're diabetic or pre-diabetic.
• Men get osteoporosis too.
• Men and women have different nutrient needs.
• Our nutrient needs change throughout our lives.
• Leaving fish, meat, or poultry out on the counter to defrost, or defrosting it in warm or hot water, can cause bacteria that develop on it to create toxins that can be deadly when eaten. You can't cook the toxins out.
• Sometimes foods are treated with ethylene gas to hasten ripening. Foods that may be gassed include tomatoes, bananas, pears, mangoes, and lemons.
• Many people are deficient in both calcium and vitamin D.
• Champagne gets you drunk faster than most other alcoholic beverages due to the bubbles in it.
• Some chewing gums contain up to seven artificial sweeteners.
• Sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, and others ending in "itol" can cause gastric upset including gas, cramps, and diarrhea. They are often found in combination with each other in gums and mints. Some people are more sensitive to their effects than others.

Do A Little Research
Since eating is something you do on a regular basis, learning about what you're eating is nothing short of a really good idea. Besides, taking the time to learn about the nutritional value of foods and beverages pays off with big dividends. Not only does it allow you to avoid chemical additives—particularly the questionable ones—which your body has to filter out, but it also enables you to more readily make healthier choices that taste good. An easy way to begin: start a small notebook, virtual or otherwise, that you can take with you, and make notes about particular foods until you become more familiar with what they offer nutritionally. And check up on them regularly—ingredients often change.

Learn How To Read Labels
Learning how to read nutrition labels isn't that tricky once you get the hang of it. Mainly it's important not to be fooled by simply looking at the amount of fat, carbs, sugar, sodium, and other nutritional components listed. Look at the serving size and servings per container (see Figure 1 on the next page) and multiply as needed to get the calories, grams, or other units for the actual amounts you'll consume. Note that the serving size listed is one cup, and that the number of servings per container is two. So if you eat the entire container, you are actually con-suming 520 calories worth (260 calories per cup x two servings). You'll also be getting 26 total grams of fat, 10 grams of saturated fat, and 4 grams of trans fat.

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Me, Myself & Food: Conquering The Struggle Against Overweight And Obesity Without Dieting 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stop wasting time and money on diets. This book is fast, simple, and right on.