Me, the Mob, and the Music: One Helluva Ride with Tommy James and The Shondells

Me, the Mob, and the Music: One Helluva Ride with Tommy James and The Shondells

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Overview

Me, the Mob, and the Music: One Helluva Ride with Tommy James and The Shondells by Tommy James

Now in paperback, after five hardcover printings, Tommy James’s wild and entertaining true story of his career—part rock&roll fairytale, part valentine to a bygone era, and part mob epic—that “reads like a music-industry version of Goodfellas” (The Denver Post).

Everyone knows the hits: “Hanky Panky,” “Mony Mony,” “I Think We’re Alone Now,” “Crimson and Clover,” “Crystal Blue Persuasion.” All of these songs, which epitomize great pop music of the late 1960s, are now widely used in television and film and have been covered by a diverse group of artists from Billy Idol to Tiffany to R.E.M. Just as compelling as the music itself is the life Tommy James lived while making it.

James tells the incredible story, revealing his complex and sometimes terrifying relationship with Roulette Records and Morris Levy, the legendary Godfather of the music business. Me, the Mob, and the Music is a fascinating portrait of this swaggering, wildly creative era of rock ’n’ roll, when the hits kept coming and payola and the strong-arm tactics of the Mob were the norm, and what it was like, for better or worse, to be in the middle of it.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781439142646
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 02/16/2010
Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 111,053
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Tommy James (born Thomas Gregory Jackson, April 29, 1947, Dayton, Ohio) is the pop-rock star best known as the leader of Tommy James and the Shondells. Performing locally in Niles, Michigan, from the age of 12, James went on to record many top hits, including "Hanky Panky," "I Think We're Alone Now," "Mony Mony," "Crimson and Clover," "Sweet Cherry Wine," "Mirage," "Do Something to Me," "Gettin’ Together," "Crystal Blue Persuasion," and "Draggin' the Line." He has sold over 100 million records, has been awarded twenty-three gold singles, and nine gold and platinum albums. His songs are widely used in television and film, and have been covered by Joan Jett, Billy Idol, Tiffany, Tom Jones, Prince, and R.E.M. Tommy James continues to tour the country and record.

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Me, the Mob, and the Music: One Helluva Ride with Tommy James and The Shondells 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a child of the 60's, this book really took me back. The story behind Hanky Panky and Mony Mony were phenomenal to learn. This is the story of how Tommy Jackson became Tommy James. A good friend of mine signed with the same record company and he said the details of Tommy going to Morris Levy to get an advance was exactly like his experience. He was shaking in his boots. When he recommended the book, I had to buy it. "I Think We're Alone Now" was me and my first girlfriends favorite song. My kids rocked to Billy Idol's version of Mony Mony. Tommy James lived the rock n roll life that all of us kids dreamed of. He transcended so many changes in the music business (from 45s to LPs), changes in sound (bubble gum to psychedelic) and concert venues (he passed on Woodstock). And he got political in a totally unpredictable way. I loved the read. This book isn't great literature. It is just a great story of a rock n roll odyssey during a time of great growth and change in our world. Read it and have some fun.
Anonymous 2 days ago
Great insite to one of my favorite artist from my childhood.
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PAGirl0404 More than 1 year ago
This was one of the most interesting books I have ever read. ***** Brings back memories of great songs and good times.
Mr_Bassman More than 1 year ago
Having met Tommy many times through the years one can attest to the fact he is a nice person. Tommy is a great singer, writer and all rounded musician. The book is aboslutly riviting. Once you start it you will find it difficult to put down. Begin reading it when you have time because you will not want to stop. Entertaining and serious at the same time. Try it, you will like it.
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TheAnonymousDude More than 1 year ago
Tommy Jackson (James) made a deal with the devil, personified by the head of Roulette Records Morris Levy. This book is mostly about that association. Parents, friends, musical collaborators, lovers, wives, his child, and even his music seem to be mentioned just to establish a chronology of the one relationship in his life that seems to have made an impression. I went into this book not knowing much about Tommy James. What I came out with is I don't especially care for him as a person. It's an interesting story and I still love the music. But man, for an autobiography he sure comes off shallow.
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Deejub More than 1 year ago
When one says "music and the mob," one usually expects Vegas and the Rat Pack to be the subjects. Not here. Tommy James goes from his Michigan home to Pittsburgh to be a star -- by the happenstance of his group the Shondells' record being picked up by a DJ there long after its release -- and the wheels turn from there (including the need to create a whole new set of Shondells). The story is full of twists and turns that lead to a deeply mob-connected recording executive and eventually gets us to John Lennon. How? I'm not going to spoil the twisted path for the reader who doesn't know it already. You won't necessarily like Tommy James after you read the book. While he doesn't spill all the beans, there's enough here to know that there are pieces to his character that many would find troublesome. Also, the writing is occasionally stilted. Nonetheless, the book's narrative is a great tale -- connecting to the greats of the rock era in many ways -- that is stranger than fiction in many ways. It's thus recommended without hesitation.
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