Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs

Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs

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Overview

#1 New York Times Bestseller

Legendary venture capitalist John Doerr reveals how the goal-setting system of Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) has helped tech giants from Intel to Google achieve explosive growth—and how it can help any organization thrive.


In the fall of 1999, John Doerr met with the founders of a start-up whom he'd just given $12.5 million, the biggest investment of his career. Larry Page and Sergey Brin had amazing technology, entrepreneurial energy, and sky-high ambitions, but no real business plan. For Google to change the world (or even to survive), Page and Brin had to learn how to make tough choices on priorities while keeping their team on track. They'd have to know when to pull the plug on losing propositions, to fail fast. And they needed timely, relevant data to track their progress—to measure what mattered.

Doerr taught them about a proven approach to operating excellence: Objectives and Key Results. He had first discovered OKRs in the 1970s as an engineer at Intel, where the legendary Andy Grove ("the greatest manager of his or any era") drove the best-run company Doerr had ever seen. Later, as a venture capitalist, Doerr shared Grove's brainchild with more than fifty companies. Wherever the process was faithfully practiced, it worked.

In this goal-setting system, objectives define what we seek to achieve; key results are how those top-priority goals will be attained with specific, measurable actions within a set time frame. Everyone's goals, from entry level to CEO, are transparent to the entire organization.

The benefits are profound. OKRs surface an organization's most important work. They focus effort and foster coordination. They keep employees on track. They link objectives across silos to unify and strengthen the entire company. Along the way, OKRs enhance workplace satisfaction and boost retention.

In Measure What Matters, Doerr shares a broad range of first-person, behind-the-scenes case studies, with narrators including Bono and Bill Gates, to demonstrate the focus, agility, and explosive growth that OKRs have spurred at so many great organizations. This book will help a new generation of leaders capture the same magic.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780525536222
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/24/2018
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 10,129
Product dimensions: 5.70(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

John Doerr is an engineer, acclaimed venture capitalist, and the chairman of Kleiner Perkins. He was an original investor and board member at Google and Amazon, helping to create more than half a million jobs and the world's second and third most valuable companies. He's passionate about encouraging leaders to reimagine the future, from transforming healthcare to advancing applications of machine learning. Outside of Kleiner Perkins, John works with social entrepreneurs for change in public education, the climate crisis, and global poverty. John serves on the board of the Obama Foundation and ONE.org.

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Excerpted from "Measure What Matters"
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Copyright © 2018 John Doerr.
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Table of Contents

Foreword Larry Page, Alphabet CEO and Google Cofounder xi

Part 1 OKRs in Action

1 Google, Meet OKRs 3

How OKRs came to Google, and the superpowers they convey

2 The Father of OKRs 19

Andy Grove creates and inculcates a new way of structured goal setting

3 Operation Crush: An Intel Story 35

How OKRs won the microprocessor wars

4 Superpower #1: Focus and Commit to Priorities 47

OKRs help us choose what matters most

5 Focus: The Remind Story 58

Brett Kopf used OKRs to overcome attention deficit disorder

6 Commit: The Nuna Story 69

Jini Kim's personal commitment to transform health care

7 Superpower #2: Align and Connect for Teamwork 77

Public, transparent OKRs spark and strengthen collaboration.

8 Align: The MyFitnessPal Story 90

Alignment via OKRs is more challenging-and rewarding-than Mike Lee anticipated.

9 Connect: The Intuit Story 102

Atticus Tysen uses OKR transparency to fortify a software pioneer's open culture.

10 Superpower #3: Track for Accountability 113

OKRs help us monitor progress and course-correct.

11 Track: The Gates Foundation Story 126

A $20 billion start-up wields OKRs to fight devastating diseases.

12 Superpower #4: Stretch for Amazing 133

OKRs empower us to achieve the seemingly impossible.

13 Stretch: The Google Chrome Story 143

CEO Sundar Pichai uses OKRs to build the world's leading web browser.

14 Stretch: The YouTube Story 154

CEO Susan Wojcicki and an audacious billion-hour goal.

Part 2 The New World of Work

15 Continuous Performance Management: OKRs and CFRs 175

How conversations, feedback, and recognition help to achieve excellence.

16 Ditching Annual Performance Reviews: The Adobe Story 189

Adobe affirms core values with conversations and feedback.

17 Baking Better Every Day: The Zume Pizza Story 197

A robotics pioneer leverages OKRs for teamwork and leadership-and to create the perfect pizza.

18 Culture 212

OKRs catalyze culture; CFRs nourish it.

19 Culture Change: The Lumeris Story 223

Overcoming OKR resistance with a culture makeover.

20 Culture Change: Bono's ONE Campaign Story 234

The world's greatest rock star deploys OKRs to save lives in Africa.

21 The Goals to Come 245

Dedication 247

Resource 1 Google's OKR Playbook 255

Resource 2 A Typical OKR Cycle 267

Resource 3 All Talk: Performance Conversation 269

Resource 4 In Sum 273

Resource 5 For Further Reading 281

Acknowledgments 283

Notes 289

Index 297

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Measure What Matters: How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous 11 months ago
A do it book: focus on what counts. How though? Great examples on how to. Website to support the book: do it. Read it, get to the last page as measured by your capability to tell the the story. Do it, at home for your home improvement plan. Do it with your study project. Do it with your startup and on your job and with your social support role at your local community organization. Its effective ;)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good repeat of old stories.
DeediReads More than 1 year ago
“We must realize—and act on the realization—that if we try to focus on everything, we focus on nothing.” This book was a quick, actionable, engaging read that left me feeling inspired to set goals and then go achieve them. Doerr is a leader in his field, and he writes clearly and confidently. OKR stands for Objectives and Key Results. It is a way of defining a) where you’re going and b) the intermediate steps that can be measured so you know you’re on your way there. This can help everyone in an organization understand true priorities and goals, and it makes it easier to choose what to spend your precious time working on. You start with your objective and then list the key results that must happen in order to obtain that objective: Objective: Grow sales in Q3 Key Result: Increase sales by 10% Key Result: Trim expenses by 5% Key Result: Get 1,000 new customers In a company, those key results can then move down the funnel: Objective: Increase sales by 10% (formerly a key result) Key Result: Send sales team members on 3 sales call per day Key Result: Achieve 10% return on advertising spend Key Result: Decrease conversion processing time by 25% I really liked the structure of the book. The concept of OKRs is pleasingly simple to grasp—that’s kind of the point, after all—so Doerr doesn’t need to spend chapters and chapters helping you get it. Instead, he lets other leaders speak for themselves, telling of the ways their own organizations use OKRs, the challenges they faced along the way, and the results they achieved. These aren’t simple endorsements; they’re complex examples that really shed light on everything Doerr teaches. As I read, my mind kept wandering to ways I can better use OKRs in my own career and life. And what more do you want from a book like this? All my reviews can be seen on deedireads.com.