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Medea and Other Plays
     

Medea and Other Plays

by E. P. Coleridge, Euripides
 

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Euripides, along was Sophocles and Aeschylus, is largely responsible for the rise of Greek tragedy. It was in the 5th Century BC, during the height of Greece's cultural bloom, that Euripides lived and worked. Of his roughly ninety-two plays, only seventeen tragedies survive. Both ridiculed and lauded during his life, Euripides now stands as an innovator of the

Overview

Euripides, along was Sophocles and Aeschylus, is largely responsible for the rise of Greek tragedy. It was in the 5th Century BC, during the height of Greece's cultural bloom, that Euripides lived and worked. Of his roughly ninety-two plays, only seventeen tragedies survive. Both ridiculed and lauded during his life, Euripides now stands as an innovator of the Greek drama. Collected here are four of Euripides' tragedies: "Alcestis", "Medea", "The Heracleidae", and "Hippolytus". "Alcestis" follows Ardemus' attempt to rescue his beloved wife Prince Alcestis in Hades. "Medea" tells the horrific tale of a woman who seeks revenge on her husband by killing her children. "The Heracleidae" is a tragedy of justice and virtue involving the children of the great Heracles. Lastly, "Hippolytus" tells of Hippolytus, son of Theseus, and his tragic fall at the hands of Phaedra. For the lover of drama and the ancient world, this collection is not to be missed-Euripides is seen here in all of his valor and brilliance.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781420945263
Publisher:
Neeland Media
Publication date:
01/01/2012
Pages:
84
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.20(d)

Meet the Author

Euripides, the youngest of the three great Athenian playwrights, was born around 485 BC of a family of good standing. He first competed in the dramatic festivals in 455 BC, coming only third; his record of success in the tragic competitions is lower than that of either Aeschylus or Sophocles. There is a tradition that he was unpopular, even a recluse; we are told that he composed poetry in a cave by the sea, near Salamis. What is clear from contemporary evidence, however, is that audiences were fascinated by his innovative and often disturbing dramas. His work was controversial already in his lifetime, and he himself was regarded as a ‘clever’ poet, associated with philosophers and other intellectuals. Towards the end of his life he went to live at the court of Archelaus, king of Macedon. It was during his time there that he wrote what many consider his greates work, the Bacchae. When news of his death reached Athens in early 406 BC, Sophocles appeared publicly in mourning for him. Euripides is thought to have written about ninety-two plays, of which seventeen tragedies and one satyr-play known to be his survive; the other play which is attributed to him, the Rhesus, may in fact be by a later hand.

John Davie is head of classics at St. Paul's School in London.

Richard Rutherford is tutor in Greek and Latin literature at Christ Church, Oxford.

Richard Rutherford is tutor in Greek and Latin literature at Christ Church, Oxford.

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