Medicinal and Other Uses of North American Plants: A Historical Survey with Special Reference to the Eastern Indian Tribes

Medicinal and Other Uses of North American Plants: A Historical Survey with Special Reference to the Eastern Indian Tribes

by Charlotte Erichsen-Brown
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Medicinal and Other Uses of North American Plants: A Historical Survey with Special Reference to the Eastern Indian Tribes 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book presents a large quantity of plant species organized generally by habitat and families. The plant descriptions are not wholly scientific so the book cannot be used as a field identification guide. The book also presupposes a knowledge of botany and ethnobotany. The historical data pertaining to plant uses is extensive but not verifiable in terms of validity. There is no doubt that the information is accurately documented, however, determining if the information is correct or unbiased is another matter. The book is best used in conjunction with more informative regional ethnobotanical guides or as a topical introduction to North American plant use through history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For HOH and POV
Guest More than 1 year ago
A fascinating compilation of historical accounts of the uses of many plants. Sources going back to the 16th century are cited and while mostly antidotal they are the often very interesting, instructive and often the best information we have about the Native Americans and early settlers and their use of plants. The historical information extends to the late 1970s.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This species, like the snow leopard, is one of those tht is somewhere between the small cats and the great cats in that it can't purr like the small cats and it can't roar like the true great cats. <p> The tree climbing talents of the clouded rival that he Margay, running down trees head-first and climbing branches horizontaly. They are also quite adept at swimming and readily take to water. <p> &delta&iota<_>z&epsilon & A&rho&rho&epsilon&alpha<_>r&alpha&eta<_>c&epsilon :: <br> The clouded leopard gets its name from the distinct cloud like markings on its body, head, legs, and tail. The inside color of the clouds are darker than the background color, and sometimes they are dotted with small black spots. The pelt ranges from orche to tawny to silver-gray. Black and pale white have been reported in the wild. The legs and belly are marked with large black ovals and the back of the neck is marked with 2 thick black bars. The tail, which is long as the head and body length, is thick and plush with black rings. The clouded leopard has the longest canines relatively speaking than any ither living cat. They weigh between 22-45 pounds. <p> Live an average of 11 years. <p> Litters of 1-5 (average 3) are born after an average 93 day gestation (little more than 3 moons). <p> Clouded leopards are equally adept at hunting on the ground as they are in trees, but uses trees primarily as a resting place. Their diet includes birds, primates, small mammals, porcupines, deer, and wild boar.