Meet Me in Nuthatch

Meet Me in Nuthatch

by Jacqueline T. Lynch

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Overview

A whimsical, poignant tale about a practical joke-turned publicity stunt that fires up the small town of Nuthatch, Massachusetts, in a desperate attempt to attract tourists.

Christmas tree farmer Everett Campbell proposes turning the clock back to 1904 and reviving the town's cozy past, an idea he gets from watching his young daughter's favorite classic movie, Meet Me in St. Louis.  She is thrilled at being allowed to dress up and pretend, but not everyone in town is enchanted with the nostalgic promotion—including Everett's moody teenage son.

The media, and the tourists, do come, but the scheme also attracts a large theme park corporation that wants to buy Nuthatch 1904.

Everett now stands to lose his town in a way he never imagined, and his neighbors are divided on which alternate future to choose.

A local drug dealer, Everett's boyhood enemy, may hold the future of the entire town in his hands unless Everett can pull off one of his most spectacular, and dangerous, practical jokes.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940156157273
Publisher: Jacqueline T. Lynch
Publication date: 09/24/2018
Sold by: Draft2Digital
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 324 KB

About the Author

Jacqueline T. Lynch has published articles and short fiction in regional and national publications, several plays, some award winners, one of which has been translated into Dutch and produced in the Netherlands.   Her several books, fiction and nonfiction, are available in eBook and print online.  She has recently published the first book on the career of actress Ann Blyth – Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star.  She writes a syndicated newspaper column on classic films: Silver Screen, Golden Years, and also writes three blogs:

Another Old Movie Blog (http://anotheroldmovieblog.blogspot.com)  A blog on classic films.

New England Travels (http://newenglandtravels.blogspot.com)  A blog on historical and cultural sites in New England.

Ann Blyth: Actress. Singer. Star. (http://annblythactresssingerstar.blogspot.com)

website: www.JacquelineTLynch.com

Etsy shop: LynchTwinsPublishing -- 

https://www.etsy.com/shop/LynchTwinsPublishing?ref=search_shop_redirect

Customer Reviews

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Meet Me in Nuthatch 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
GraceKrispy More than 1 year ago
Nuthatch, a tiny town in Massachusetts, is slowly fading away. Day by day, the population dwindles as people move away to find new opportunities and a better life. When the population is down to a scant 63, Everett, a lifetime resident, decides on a quirky plan to draw tourism. Soon, the town residents are dressing like it's 1904, and their mannerisms and choices begin to reflect that era. Tourism does increase, and the town begins to draw the attention of the media. The next thing Everett knows, a huge amusement park company has plans to purchase the entire town and create jobs and opportunity for its residents in the Nuthatch 1904 theme. Now Everett, who has never known- or wanted- any other life, must decide if his future lies in Nuthatch or somewhere else. In "Meet Me In Nuthatch," Jacqueline T. Lynch has created small-town characters who ring true. The various connections between these characters help to show the years of history they have together. There is Roy, the town drug dealer, who has terrorized this tiny town and several of its residents personally. Everett, who isn't quite happy in his life, and is haunted by poor choices he made that put his best friend, Bud, a member of the only Black family in town, at risk. Miss Finchley, the unofficial town historian, has a lot invested in her town her choices may surprise people. The author has woven these complex relationships into a story that leads right back to Everett. At times, these relationships threaten to take over the book. I really enjoyed following the thread of the biggest themes, but I think they compete too heavily at times with the main theme of the story. This story is about Everett and his relationship with his town, but sometimes it seemed that his relationships with Roy or Miss Finchley overpowered what I saw as the true theme. His relationships with Norm and Bud seemed more secondary and blended well with the overall story. This story kept my interest. It was a pleasant read, with interesting characters and a unique premise. Although the writing is simplistic, there are some delightful phrasings intermixed with the prose. For example: "The capital letters stood escorting their lower case versions, ghosts of primary school" was used to describe the faded alphabet letters on the former primary classroom wall. There were some jumps in time without much in the way of explanation that left me a little confused, turning back to see where I had missed a week or more. I think it was somewhat fitting in the style of the story, but still confusing. Altogether, this book is not an exciting read, but it's a comforting, pleasant read that stays with you even after the last page is turned. After finishing the book, I found myself still musing about the relationships and how they'd changed and progressed. This book was a nice, hot chocolate sort of read. MotherLode blog
beckvalleybooks More than 1 year ago
When I started reading this novel I couldn't put it down, the author's style of writing and descriptions used throughout had me hooked. When his town is suffering from lack of tourism Everett Campbell comes up with the idea of asking the towns folk to act and dress as if it is 1904. When they all agree it attracts the attention of the media and new business as well as an offer from a theme park company to buy the whole town and employ all of them is the answer to all their problems. The authors real skill in this story is bringing all of the characters to life and you can envisage yourself there watching it all happening before you. The struggle of Everett can be seen in your own life, as he struggles to build a relationship with his teenage son, tries to keep his young daughter's wishes alive whilst maintaining a healthy marriage. The exploits, discussions and scheming which appears throughout the novel will make you smile, feel despair and most of all contemplate 'is change really a good idea'. Even though this is a work of fiction I believe that somewhere along the line small communities who have been meandering along in their own manner and customs, have had their lives improved by corporate companies, for their own gain, which gives the story a certain truth. This is the first book I have read by this author and I will certainly be looking out for more of her novels from now on.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Takes all the eggs
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lots of them
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good story but true sometimes
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Meet Me in Nuthatch is a fun portrayal of a small town publicity stunt gone awry. Taking time back to the turn of the century brings more people (customers) to Nuthatch, but the townfolk find it isn't that easy. It is a fun quick read, though.