A Meeting at Corvallis (Emberverse Series #3)

A Meeting at Corvallis (Emberverse Series #3)

by S. M. Stirling

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451461667
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/04/2007
Series: Emberverse Series , #3
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 640
Sales rank: 108,962
Product dimensions: 4.17(w) x 6.72(h) x 1.40(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

S. M. Stirling is the New York Times bestselling author of many science fiction and fantasy novels, including the Novels of the Change (including Prince of Outcasts, The Desert and the Blade, The Golden Princess, The Given Sacrifice, Lord of Mountains) and the Shadowspawn series (A Taint in the Blood, The Council of Shadows, Shadows of Falling Night).

Table of Contents

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Comes up to Stirling's highest standards for pacing, world building, action, and strong characterizations, particularly of women." —-Booklist Starred Review

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A Meeting at Corvallis (Emberverse Series #3) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 95 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ten years ago the ¿Change¿ destroyed technology leaving a shocked population behind to adjust or die. Some survivors want to live their live their lives in peaceful harmony with nature, but know others will remain aggressive taking whatever they want through force. --- Former U.S. Marine Mike Havel leads the Bearkillers, neighbors working together to protect one another from invaders. At the same time that Mike¿s Bearkillers form an alliance with Juniper MacKenzie's pagan clan, ex-history professor Norman Arminger declares himself the Lord Protector of the northwest while establishing a neo-fascist feudalistic empire. The two cultures select different paths that lead initially to a cold war rivalry as two philosophies clash. However, the hostilities turn into armed combat with the winner goes the spoils (and the future history books). --- The Third Change tale takes the previous recent alternative history tales (see THE PROTECTOR¿S WAR and DIES THE FIRE) into the near future in an exciting and fitting end to this science fiction thriller trilogy. The action never slows down as the Bearkillers and their allies clash with the Lord Protector and his minion of followers. Though fun, readers should peruse the previous novels to obtain the full flavor of how society got to where it is in 2007. Though much of the key cast members seem two dimensional this is a rousing finale to a strong trilogy. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Full of thrilling battles between the Portland Protective Association and the conglomorate of Bearkillers and Mckenzies among others. Classic Good vs. Evil plotline with romance and frienships abound. Very good charavter develpment as well. A great read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I expected a little more action in this book... Over all though it really fit in with the rest of the series, answered some questions and the continuity is really wonderful! I honestly have not been able to put one of these books down until I finish them.. can't wait to see what happens next!
LN_Adcox More than 1 year ago
The second book of the series, ¿The Protector¿s War¿, wasn¿t about the war at all, but only the events leading up to it. It moved the series along but was a bit slower paced than the first book of the series, ¿Dies the Fire¿. This book is as good as the first. It is all about the Protector¿s War with the Bearkillers, Clan Mackenzie, the Mount Angel Monastery and sundry allies on one side and Lord Protector Norman Arminger¿s Portland Protective Association forces on the other side.

We are introduced to other characters that become important to the story. The English contingent of the Lorings and John Hordle are firmly established. Arminger¿s consort, Lady Sandra, proves to be more cunning and calculating than he is. The formidable Tiphaine Rutherton claims to be evil like Lady Sandra but often does the right thing even if it also the practical thing to do. We also see the development and linkage of the Portland Protective Association heir, Lady Mathilda and the Clan Mackenzie heir, Rudi.

Two different concepts of government are opposed reminiscent of the battle between capitalism and communism. The governments and practices of the Bearkillers, Clan Mackenzie, the Mount Angel Monastery and Corvallis University do not look the same but they all rely on the will of the governed, individual initiative and freedom. On the other hand, Arminger¿s feudal model of government, like the Nazism of Hitler, depends on creating an empire of the free and privileged few living on the slave labor of the conquered. Also like Hitler, Arminger¿s strategy is based on his superior numbers, assumed superior technology and his blitzkrieg attack. There are two phases of this war, and the second phase builds to a dynamic and surprising conclusion. This is a great book in a great series.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The third book in the 'Dies The Fire' series brings everything together in an action packed finale that leaves you hoping that this series is not a mere trilogy. After the disappointing second novel in the series, 'The Protectors War' it was as if Stirling awakened and fed his readers the nonstop thrills that we have come to admire. One detailed battle followed another leaving the reader barely a chance to catch his or her breath. Great read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The trilogy begun in Dies the Fire and continued in The Protector's War concludes here, though the author is already working on a second trilogy (to be set twelve years later). Norman Arminger's neofeudal 'Portland Protective Association' is finally starting the long-promised war Mike Havel's 'Bearkillers,' Juniper Mackenzies clan of Wiccans and the monks of Mount Angel are standing firmly against them, but the faculty ruling the city-state of Corvallis are still refusing to dedigitate. Who will win? With this author, it's not truly a guarantee that the good guys will come out on top.... Well-written fight scenes (ranging from single combat, through small-unit actions, up to full-scale battles involving several thousand soldiers) abound, as do equally well-written descriptive passages showing the author's excellent eye for detail, be it scenic, architectural, or other. All of the old characters (or at least, those who survived the first two books) are back, and new character Tiphaine Rutherton is one of my favourites from the whole series. This is Stirling's best thus far, with promise of more to come. Go, read, enjoy!
Guest More than 1 year ago
A Meeting at Corvallis is a definite 'buy now' book. It is the last in the Dies the Fire trilogy and is even more exciting than the second book, The Protector's War. In this novel, we see the events leading up to and the exciting conclusion of the war between the Ptotectorate, and the Bearkillers, The Mackenzies, the Monks of Mt. Angel and the volunteer group from Corvallis. Exciting, intersting and extremely well written are the words which come to mind in considering what to put in this review. The trilogy deals with the survivors and the societies they develop after 'The Change' in which all explosives, electricity, and artificial power, such as jet engines, steam engines and internal combustion engines suddenly cease to function. Muscle, water and wind form the sources of power, much as would have been the case before the invention of these devices. The descriptions of the various groups, their coping mechanisms and the development of the characters are far better than I have seen in any other books dealing with post apocalyptic scenarios. Buy this book and the other two in the trilogy now. You won't be sorry!
Guest More than 1 year ago
'A Meeting At Corvallis' is another triumph for the author, S. M. Stirling. This series started with 'Dies The Fire', was followed by The 'Protector's War' and now the trilogy is complete with 'A meeting At Corvallis'. The story is set ten years after a world wide change occurred, rendering the internal combustion engine, the steam engine, electricity and explosives non functional. A number of communities developed in Oregon and the story concerns three major communities with several others in less prominent roles in the story. The Bearkillers and their allies, the Mackenzies, plus a faction of the residents of Corvallis, as well as the monks in Mt.Angel are attacked by the Protectorate, a feudal society ruled by a 'Lord Protector' in Portland. This, the last of the three novels of the trilogy, deals with the final battle and a surprising outcome. Throughout all three books, the communities, the leaders and a number of more minor characters are developed to a most interesting degree. We can clearly see how even the 'evil' Lord Protector thinks and reasons. Without a doubt, the trilogy as a whole and this book in particular, are the best I have ever read on this subject.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A Meeting At Corvallis marks the final chapter in the first trilogy started by Stirling's Dies the Fire. Fans of the earlier books as well as the Island in the Sea of Time trilogy will love it. The forces of the Protectorate and the free nations of Oregon are marshalled and prepared for battle -- the only question is, who will emerge victorious? The forces of freedom or those of tyrany? I look forward to even more books set in the world of the Change to come!
robertweaver on LibraryThing 28 days ago
I found this at the YMCA lending library as I was waiting for my son's Capoiera class and it was good enough to prompt me to check out the next two books from the library and finish all 3 in less than 2 weeks.
jrcchicago on LibraryThing 28 days ago
Interesting plot device, fairly well-written and well-thought out. It is a bit contrived, but I freely admit that I have not been able to put down any of the books in the series, and that as I finished each one I nervously began making mental lists of necessary survival gear for when the lights go out for good.
JDubba on LibraryThing 28 days ago
I think the best way to conceptualize this, the third book in Stirling¿s series that began with Dies the Fire, is as the second part of The Protector¿s War. The storylines and themes that began there are woven through into A Meeting at Corvallis and completed therein. The pace of this book starts off somewhat slow in comparison to its two predecessors, however the action soon arises and regains the rapid and gripping pace that made the first two books of the series quite enjoyable. Again, as in the first two books, Stirling explores the impact of mythology, lore and religion in an agrarian society, comparing and contrasting healthy individual spirituality with domineering organized religious establishments. Along with this, he also presents contrasting ethical frameworks that showcase some of the fundamental aspects of liberated societies and tyrannies. During this exploration, all the major plot lines are left resolved, yet the overall milieu Stirling has created is left in a wonderful spot for the next book, which apparently will jump forward in time to the next generation of post Change survivors. One interesting facet of the series as a whole is how much the setting is reminiscent of ancient Greece. While I doubt that Stirling intentionally set out to create an allegorical account of Grecian antiquity, one thing I found myself pondering as I read these books is their loose relationship to the pre Socratic classical era that seems to lie just beneath the surface. One does not need to stretch the imagination far to picture the Spartans (Bearkillers), Athenians (Clan Mackenzie), or the collected empirical states of Persia and Asia Minor under Xerxes (Lord protector and the Portland Protectorate Authority) portrayed in the series. Any detailed analysis will show vast differences in any one of these allegorical mappings, but the loose connection kept recurring to me as I read and continually mapping fiction back to history was an integral part of the enjoyment of the series. For anyone who enjoys post-apocalyptic fiction, I would definitely recommend picking up this series. It is escapist fiction of good merit, not challenging the reader heavily in any academic way, yet intelligent and engrossing enough to allow the reader to slip away into a new yet plausible reality.
Anonymous 3 months ago
Fun
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read the first 3 books of the serise and loved them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A nice continuation of the story. Very enjoyable, and moving at times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great end to a brilliant story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An Arthurian talecwith a few twists!
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