The Merry Misogynist (Dr. Siri Paiboun Series #6)

The Merry Misogynist (Dr. Siri Paiboun Series #6)

by Colin Cotterill

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781569476543
Publisher: Soho Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 08/01/2010
Series: Dr. Siri Paiboun Series , #6
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 265,159
Product dimensions: 5.08(w) x 7.58(h) x 0.84(d)

About the Author

Colin Cotterill is the Dilys Award–winning author of nine other books in the Dr. Siri Paiboun series: The Coroner’s Lunch, Thirty-Three Teeth, Disco for the Departed, Anarchy and Old Dogs, Curse of the Pogo Stick, Love Songs from a Shallow Grave, Slash and Burn, The Woman Who Wouldn’t Die, and Six and a Half Deadly Sins. He lives in Chumphon, Thailand, with his wife and five deranged dogs.

Table of Contents

1 Five Dead Wives 1

2 Bo Ben Nyang 25

3 The Oversized Monday 49

4 Hindipendence 61

5 Doomed 71

6 In the Belly of the Brainless One 95

7 An Invisible Rice Farmer 113

8 Palace of the One-Hundred and Eleven Eyes 127

9 The Lao Patriotic Women's Association 137

10 Dancing with Death 151

11 Broken Water 157

12 In a Stupa 165

13 A Honeymoon in Hell 179

14 Coming to One's Census 199

15 A Lack of Police Intelligence 213

16 Swimming Through Rocks 223

17 There Goes the Bride 241

18 The Buddha Amusement Park 259

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The Merry Misogynist 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
LynnHarnett More than 1 year ago
Dr. Siri Paiboun, now in his mid-70s in 1978, the third year of the communist Pathet Lao government, is still Laos' chief and only state coroner in this 6th appearance. Though his desire for retirement remains unfulfilled, he has at long last found wedded bliss. Noodle seller Madame Daeng, 66, is a partisan comrade from the old days. Both are now a bit disillusioned, with the country suffering shortages of everything except bombast and repression. Madame Daeng enthusiastically joins Siri in his wish for a tranquil life and his unwillingness to suffer officious, puffed-up government bureaucrats, like the housing official standing on Madame Daeng's doorstep trying to catch Siri in the act of living there. Various people in need (from previous adventures) occupy Siri's assigned abode, and the housing man is eager to advance himself by recouping the house for the state and throwing its inhabitants out on the street. Siri, with a spirited mix of cunning and good-natured defiance, born of his years of experience, stays several steps ahead of the housing campaign while investigating a particularly gruesome murder and hunting for Crazy Rajid, a recurring character who is homeless, virtually silent, unpredictable and missing. This three-pronged plot engages Siri's professional, private and spiritual sides. As a reincarnated shaman, spirits visit or torment him from time to time and he sees dead people - and animals - their messages frustratingly cryptic. But the mysteries of the girl in his morgue are chillingly of this world - strangled, violated, tied naked to a tree. The strangulation alone is disturbing as many Lao believe that "if a person was holding a body when the life drained from it, that person was likely to provide a conduit for the spirit of the corpse and be haunted for all eternity." And then Siri discovers this girl was not the first victim - and will not be the last. Urgency disrupts Siri's normal routines. The lives of Rajid and some yet unknown innocent girl depend upon his swift progress, as does the well being of his houseguests, while the paranoia and red-tape of bureaucracy throw roadblocks in his path. But to Siri those very hindrances can be an investigative aid as well. Cotterill weaves in the killer's point of view, as is common in thrillers, but doesn't really seem necessary here. Still, it doesn't harm the story and does give us a creepy picture of a tormented, misogynist killer. Fans will find themselves at home with the usual fine cast; newcomers will not feel like strangers for long. Witty, beguiling, spiritual, very funny, and suspenseful, this series continues to occupy a class all its own.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read all of the Siri Paiboun novels, now on my 7th! I highly recommend this book, if you like clever writing, colorful characters, thrills, twists, and supernatural influences. A great read!
knazaret More than 1 year ago
Can't remember how I discovered Colin Cotterill's Dr. Siri Paiboun series set in 1970's communist Laos, but I absolutely have LOVED it! One wouldn't think that books set in this somewhat depressing time for that country would be entertaining but they are wonderfully enlightening and also amusing. I am enamored of Dr. Paiboun and his assistants, and read every new title in the series wishing them well. I have to admit that I read the early books from my public library, but have ordered every single one from Barnes and Noble to go back and reread. Colin Cotterill's new series about Jimm Juree, set in modern day Thailand, is also laugh-out-loud amusing - but at the same time very moving. "Killed at the whim of a hat," the title of book number one is taken from a George W. Bush speech - nuff said. Wonderful author, wonderful books!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was the first of the Dr. Siri books I read. He is a witty, charming character. In addition to a great story, there is information about the country of Lao and some cultural information as well. I read one book and am now voraciously reading through the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read six in the series so far and will continue to the last. Very enjoyable and quick reads. Each one hooks you right into the next.
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Dr. Siiri and friends continue to delight.
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