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A Message to Garcia: Being a Preachment
     

A Message to Garcia: Being a Preachment

4.1 32
by Elbert Hubbard
 

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An inspirational essay about a man who, "Went it alone and got it done." The story of a soldier who asks no questions, makes no objections, requests no help, but accomplishes the mission.

Overview

An inspirational essay about a man who, "Went it alone and got it done." The story of a soldier who asks no questions, makes no objections, requests no help, but accomplishes the mission.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788867441730
Publisher:
Kitabu
Publication date:
06/17/2013
Series:
Evergreen
Sold by:
StreetLib SRL
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
540 KB

Meet the Author

Elbert Hubbard was born in 1859 in Bloomington, Illinois, and never received more than a grade-school education. A self-made man in many respects, Hubbard filled in the gaps in his knowledge through voracious reading, a passion which became manifest in the founding of the Roycroft Shop, a publishing house specializing in deluxe bindings. He wrote a series of 182 biographies under the series title Little Journeys to Homes of the Great and also published two magazines, The Philistine and The Fra, producing much of the content himself. Elbert Hubbard and his wife, Alice, were traveling to England on the Lusitania and went down with the ship when it was struck by a German torpedo on May 7th, 1915.

Thomas Jefferson was born in Virginia in 1743 into a wealthy and socially prominent family. After attending the College of William and Mary, he went on to study law. At the age of twenty-six, Jefferson began building Monticello. Three years later, in 1772, he married Martha Wayles Skelton. The couple had six children, two of whom survived to adulthood. Considered elequent in his writing, although not as his speech, Jefferson took on much of the writing needed by the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress, both of which he was a member. In 1776, at the young age of 33, Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence. From 1779 to 1781, Jefferson served as Governor of Virginia. Jefferson temporarily retired from public life after his term as governor, returning to public life in 1784 as a diplomat serving in France. In 1790, Jefferson was appointed Secretary of State in President Washington's Cabinet, but resigned in 1793 over a disagreement with Alexander Hamilton. As political disagreements continued to polarize the young government, Jefferson found himself leading those who sympathized with the revolutionary cause in France. In 1800, Jefferson was elected President in a tie vote that ironically was decided by Alexander Hamilton. In 1809, after two terms as President, Jefferson returned to his home in Monticello, where he developed, among other projects, plans for the University of Virginia. In addition, he sold his collection of books to the government to form the basis of the Library of Congress. Thomas Jefferson died on July 4, 1826.

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Message to Garcia 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a Marine Major attending the Army's Command and General Staff College, I mentioned this title to my Army colleagues in a phrase that I've heard asked to many a subordinate officer over the years. The rhetorical question is more of a reminder than a query and I've had it posed to me as 2nd Lt in the simple phrase: 'Message to Garcia, Lieutenant?'. I was surprised to find that out of my class of 18 Army, Air Force, and Navy Officers, only a couple of them had heard of Elbert Hubbard's 'A Message to Garcia'. The basic tenets of initiative, self reliance, and commanders intent are set forth in this essay and it is required reading for brand new Marine Lieutenants in the Basic School and OCS (at least when I went through). I still read this from time to time to remind myself of its lessons. I also discuss it with my subordinate Officers on their initial counseling sessions. I would highly recommend this to all junior officers in the military as well as those recent business school graduates embarking upon a career in the corporate world. The lessons of ¿A Message to Garcia¿ apply across all services and occupations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoy reading this a lot. I understand why it is a classic! In the end it is about getting the job done period, no and ifs or but, get it done.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great Little book for building a good foundation in your life. this book is not for the people that only think of themselves. this is a old book that is used to be handed out to workers. one of the top ten most produced books in the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When taken literally, I suppose it could be interpreted as a 'thinly-veiled anti-labor screed,' but like any teaching document (e.g., the Bible), one should focus on the broader lessons within the stories. It is a fact of real life that s/he who accepts full accountability for accomplishing some great responsibility is always preferred by a strong leader than someone who needs constant care and feeding to get the task done. A job of the modern leader (in business, combat, the clergy, or whatever) is to accomplish much through delegation to strong team members. The lesson of this book is not that Hubbard hated the working man. It is that leaders need followers that take charge in accomplishing an assigned goal. This age-old lesson in no way conflicts with modern business or combat leadership practices. Far from being a 'dinosaur of old laissez-faire capitalism,' this timeless story teaches that leaders want goals accomplished, and don't want to have to tell followers HOW to accomplish that goal ... but in order to be able to do that, they need highly-skilled, highly autonomous followers. Yup ... every organization has its 'unthinking elements' .. this book doesn't hold them up as virtuous.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I wish I knew a way to fix the text. Parts are difficult to read because of jumbled words. The story itself is interesting to reflect on. I see why its required reading on the Commandant's reading list.
Guest More than 1 year ago
To say that this book promotes mindless followers is to say that you haven't bothered to read it. Taking into context Laissez-faire attitudes of businesses at the turn of the 20th century is fine. However, it is important to remember what time period we now live in. In today's day and age the followers that you lead need to be able to act independently and this book is a great tool to train them. It brings home the point that as a follower you can and are expected to be able to accomplish your task with nothing but the intent of your leader. This is absolutely a great lesson for everyone who reads it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
K
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read and reread this glorious piece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pads in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow, after reading some of these reviews I was expecting some grandiose credo spelling out the dangers of "blindly following" orders. I think perhaps people that gave this very short story bad reviews are uncomfortable in reading about themselves. This little pamphlet is nothing more than an ah ha moment EH had one night. He says as much in the beginning. In my 53 years of life I have to completely agree with the final analysis og Msg to Garcia.....to truly be free comes with great responsibility....deal with it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good book, I feel it has a positive message, that anyone in the workforce, can benefit from it.
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It made the new Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff's Reading List...can't think of a better endorsement.
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