Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis

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Overview

Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, Leslie Sherman

Kafka's literary masterpiece about Gregor Samsa, a young man who, transformed overnight into a "monstrous verminous bug," becomes an essentially alienated man.

THIS ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

• A concise introduction that gives the reader important background information
• A chronology of the author's life and work
• A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context
• An outline of key themes and plot points to guide the reader's own interpretations
• Detailed explanatory notes
• Critical analysis and modern perspectives on the work
• Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction
• A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781614274254
Publisher: Martino Fine Books
Publication date: 04/17/2013
Pages: 100
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.24(d)

About the Author

Franz Kafka (1883–1924) was one of the most important writers of the twentieth century. His major novels includeThe Trial,The Castle, andAmerika.

Mark M. Anderson is Professor of Germanic Languages at Columbia University. He is the author of Kafka’s Clothes and the editor of Reading Kafka. He has written widely on literary modernism and has edited and translated contemporary Austrian writers Ingeborg Bachmann and Thomas Bernhard.

Susan Bernofsky is the acclaimed translator of Hermann Hesse, Robert Walser, and Jenny Erpenbeck, and the recipient of many awards, including the Helen and Kurt Wolff Prize and the Hermann Hesse Translation Prize. She teaches literary translation at Columbia University and lives in New York.

Date of Birth:

July 3, 1883

Date of Death:

June 3, 1924

Place of Birth:

Prague, Austria-Hungary

Place of Death:

Vienna, Austria

Education:

German elementary and secondary schools. Graduated from German Charles-Ferdinand University of Prague.

Customer Reviews

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Metamorphosis 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 49 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I recently read this story for a class and I can honestly say it is the first thing I have actually read this semester. I loved this book, despite the fact it made me ¿absurdly sad¿. Kafka is a genius and the story is a testament to the power that the horrific, weird, funny and tragic elements of being human effect us all. The bottom line is READ THIS STORY!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story is definitely very original and makes you think about its messages.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the only Kafka work that I truly liked. It's short, sweet, to the point, with in-depth themes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka starts off with the climax of the book when Gregor Samsa ¿woke up one morning from unsettling dreams, he found himself changed in his bed into a monstrous vermin¿. The book deals with the family¿s reaction with the traumatizing transformation of their son and brother. The family, who was always taken care of by Gregor, now has to do the same for him. They soon fall under their own metamorphosis as time goes on. The book is heavy in symbolism and has many themes: ranging from learning to let go, living for your soul, proletariats being suppressed by the bourgeoisie, and etc.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Firstly, I must attest that I was quite fascinated with the premise of this book. The setting of your standard, ever day man becoming a huge insect that one would find repulsive originally made me expect a comedy (I didn't look into any genre tags) After completion, I realize how I was mistaken. The book just doesn't go up hill at any point which made the reading almost negatively predictable. On top of the predictability, the story just makes the reader experience overall sadness. If you're looking for a book that instill a feeling of dressing in yiu. Then thus is the book for you!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love Kafka
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love Kafka!
Eric_J_Guignard More than 1 year ago
REVIEWED: The Metamorphosis WRITTEN BY: Franz Kafka PUBLISHED: MONTH, YEAR “The Metamorphosis” is an enjoyable read, not difficult (as is often the expectation of classic literature), and interesting, in a unique, quiet way. It’s also overrated and, in my opinion, unsatisfying. The publisher’s overview is: “Gregor Samsa, a young man who, transformed overnight into a monstrous verminous bug, becomes an essentially alienated man.” That essentially sums up the entire story. There’s no more plot or build-up than that. Gregor hides in his room all day, as a bug, much to his and his family’s dismay. There’s no explanation as to what occurred to transform him as such, nor any great closing revelation; the story is simply Gregor caught up in his thoughts. It’s a book of interior voice, analogy, philosophy, satire, but not much “story.” There are many themes to contemplate, and if you are searching for a better understanding to man’s lot in life, this book may be for you. However, in terms of entertainment, it’s insufficient. Extra points allotted, however, for originality and for being the inspiration to numerous authors and genre movements such as satire and the more-recent bizarro. Three-and-a-half out of Five stars
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
The Meta­mor­pho­sis by Franz Kafka is one of the author’s most famous novel­las. The work was pub­lished after his death. This is the story of Gre­gor Samsa who wakes up one morn­ing and dis­cov­ered he has turned into a giant bug. Gre­gor is wor­ried because he over­slept and missed his train for work. The meta­mor­pho­sis is a metaphor for an ill­ness a per­son is inflicted with which is out­side their control. Gre­gor is the sole bread­win­ner for his fam­ily and their reac­tions to his rad­i­cal trans­for­ma­tion are what makes the book both sad and dis­con­cert­ing. Gregor’s fam­ily goes through grief, endurance, repug­nance and sad of all, blam­ing Gre­gor him­self and detest­ing what he has become. The Meta­mor­pho­sis by Franz Kafka is a dark and dis­turb­ing tale. The story cap­tured me from the first line “One morn­ing, as Gre­gor Samsa was wak­ing up from anx­ious dreams, he dis­cov­ered that in his bed he had been changed into a mon­strous ver­minous bug”. We know noth­ing about Gre­gor, who are what he is, and this strange open­ing sim­ply breeds curiosity. The story is rel­e­vant even today, which is why I believe this sim­ple tale became a clas­sic. The feel­ing of help­less­ness, escap­ing things which are dif­fi­cult and /or beyond our con­trol and make our hum­drum lives easy and sim­ple. It is dif­fi­cult to face the truth, and why would you want to unless you absolutely had to do so? Kafka’s world (in this case a room) is dark and fore­bod­ing, with sit­u­a­tions beyond anyone’s con­trol. The indi­vid­ual bat­tles against the powers-that-be (be they gov­ern­ment, Kismet, G-d or just chance) is lost from the begin­ning and even if you’d won – it still wouldn’t make a difference. I found the rela­tion­ship of the pro­tag­o­nist and his fam­ily to be the most fas­ci­nat­ing. In a short time he goes from being the hum­ble bread­win­ner to a persona-non-grata. Even though his fam­ily looks down on him, Gre­gor still works at a job he doesn’t like sim­ply because oth­ers are more impor­tant to him then him­self. Gre­gor doesn’t have a “life”, sim­ply goes to work, hands over his money to help his debt rid­den fam­ily and thinks that this is the way things are. Gre­gor seems to be the per­son every­one kicks around, his fam­ily is lazy, at his work he is humil­i­ated and even though never miss­ing a day of work he con­stantly feels as if he’ll get fired and now he is turned to a bug. I did not expect this short story to be so deep, there are many themes con­de­scend in a short space and between the lines. I would highly rec­om­mend this novella to any­one who likes to think into the deeper mean­ing of what is not writ­ten rather than a straight out narrative.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RaiRR More than 1 year ago
This was a really weird book.Is Gregor really a beetle? or Is his metamorphosis metaphorical?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
StevenLuu More than 1 year ago
Franz Kafka uses brilliant symbolism, hilarious tone, and unique characterizations to exemplify the plight and transformation of this unfortunate salesman and it is through these tools that Kafka creates an absurd experience that any reader can relate to. The symbolism throughout this story is for the reader to understand and appreciate Gregor's view towards independence. Gregor was changed over night into a gaint insect, but Kafka uses this change as a symbol for Gregor's metamorphosis towards humanity. Before Gregor's transformation, he only lived life to serve others, but through his metamorphosis Gregor slowly comes to meet his own desires, seeking a more personal independence and even coming to appreciate music and art more.I found this book extremely entertaining. I would recommend it to anyone who likes suspense and drama.In order to see life as it really is, is to see that life is not worth living without people who love you and whom you can love.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of Kafka's masterpieces, The Metamorphosis includes an original story and an outstanding understanding of human psychology. Gregor turns into a bug, but doesn't panic about it because he is so entrenched in the desire to please others, as many of us do. Gregor's transformation doesn't merely constructs a creative plot, but also provides insight on reality. Is Gregor's bug-state an escape from his responsibilities? Or is it rather an intensification of his plight and already miserable life? While on the surface a simple and short novella, this book is definitely worth reading if one wishes a literary challenge and get into its themes.