ISBN-10:
0789556103
ISBN-13:
9780789556103
Pub. Date:
12/20/1999
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Microsoft Access 2000: Comprehensive Concepts and Techniques / Edition 1

Microsoft Access 2000: Comprehensive Concepts and Techniques / Edition 1

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780789556103
Publisher: Cengage Learning
Publication date: 12/20/1999
Series: Shelly Cashman Series
Pages: 624
Product dimensions: 8.52(w) x 10.84(h) x 0.81(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Gary B. Shelly and Tom J. Cashman, wrote and published their first computer education textbook in 1969. More than twenty million copies of Shelly Cashman textbooks have been sold. Gary, Tom, and a talented group of contributing authors have produced leading textbooks on computer programming, computer concepts, and application software.

Read an Excerpt

Project I: Creating a Database Using Design and Datasheet Views

Educational issues dominate the airwaves and print media. From decorum in the classroom to equal access to the Internet, schoolrelated topics are broadcast on the evening news and published in the morning newspapers. Then discussions take place around family dinner tables and at study sessions. Often these dialogues focus on improving the classroom experience by strengthening the relationship among edu cators, students, community members, and funding sources.

One effective way of enriching the learning process is to involve various groups in education. For example, college students are earning federal work-study funds by helping students in elementary grades learn to read and do math in the America Reads and the America Counts programs. More than 900 public schools have received grants in the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program to provide safe places for children to gather. Business leaders critique middle school students' writing samples as part of the National School Network Exchange, a grant-funded program that links more than 500 schools, companies, museums, and governmental agencies via the Internet.

In mythology, Mentor advised Odysseus, who lead the Greeks in the Trojan War. In today's world, mentors advise people needing direction and coaching. These partnerships are common in the computer field. For example, network experts collaborate with a culturally diverse school district to network classrooms throughout the region. Technology buffs develop a distance education program for students living in remote areas. Software experts install donated copies of Microsoft Office incomputer labs and then train teachers.

Building these partnerships requires superb technological and organizational skills, strong marketing, and dedicated staff members. Various local, regional, and national organizations have the right mix of technology expertise and qualified personnel to meet these requirements. The nation's largest nonprofit computerization assistance center, CompuMentor, is one of these successful partnering organizations. CompuMentor has linked its staff with more than 6,000 schools and other nonprofit organizations since 1987.

The heart of its success is matching computer experts with the appropriate school or organization. Some mentors volunteer long term, while others agree to work intensively for a few days, particularly in telecommunications areas. Potential mentors complete an application at CompuMentor's Web site (www.compumentor.org) by entering specific information in boxes, called fields, pertaining to their knowledge of operating systems, networking, and hardware repair. They give additional information about their available working hours, training experience, and special skills in office and accounting applications, databases, and desktop publishing.

This information structures records in the CompuMentor database. The staff then can search these records to find a volunteer whose skills match the school's or organization's needs. Similarly, in Project 1, you will use the Access database management system to enter records in the Bavant Marine Services database so the marina staff can match service technicians with boat owners whose vessels need repairs.

Uniting schools with appropriate experts increases awareness of educational issues and ultimately improves the learning process. For more information on building mentoring relationships, visit the U.S. Department of Education Web site (www.ed.gov) or call 1-800-USA-LEARN...

Table of Contents

Project 1: Creating a Database Using Design and Datasheet Views Project 2: Querying a Database Using the Select Query Window Project 3: Maintaining a Database Using the Design and Update Features of Access Web Feature: Publishing to the Internet Using Access Data Pages Project 4: Reports, Forms, and Combo Boxes Project 5: Enhancing Forms with OLE Fields, Hyperlinks, and Subforms Project 6: Creating an Application System Using Macros, Wizards, and the Switchboard Manager Integration Feature: Integrating Excel Worksheet Data to an Access Database Project 7: Creating a Report Using Design View Project 8: Customizing Forms Using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), Charts, and PivotTable Objects Project 9: Administering a Database System Integration Feature: Using Access Data in Other Applications Appendices A: Microsoft Access 2000 Help System B: Publishing Office Web Pages to a Web Server C: Resetting the Access Menus and Toolbars D: Microsoft Office User Specialist Certification Program

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