×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 PowerShell Cookbook: Second Edition
     

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 PowerShell Cookbook: Second Edition

4.0 1
by Jonas Andersson, Mike Pfeiffer
 

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 is a complex messaging system. Windows PowerShell 3 can be used in conjunction with Exchange Server 2013 to automate and manage routine and complex tasks to save time, money, and eliminate errors.

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 PowerShell Cookbook: Second Edition offers more than 120 recipes and solutions to everyday

Overview

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 is a complex messaging system. Windows PowerShell 3 can be used in conjunction with Exchange Server 2013 to automate and manage routine and complex tasks to save time, money, and eliminate errors.

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 PowerShell Cookbook: Second Edition offers more than 120 recipes and solutions to everyday problems and tasks encountered in the management and administration of Exchange Server. If you want to write scripts that help you create mailboxes, monitor server resources, and generate detailed reports, then this Cookbook is for you.

This practical guide to Powershell and Exchange Server 2013 will help you automate and manage time-consuming and reoccurring tasks quickly and efficiently. Starting by going through key PowerShell concepts and the Exchange Management Shell, this book will get you automating tasks that used to take hours in no time.

With practical recipes on the management of recipients and mailboxes as well as distribution groups and address lists, this book will save you countless hours on repetitive tasks. Diving deeper, you will then manage your mailbox database, client access, and your transport servers with simple but effective scripts.

This book finishes with advanced recipes on Exchange Server problems such as server monitoring as well as maintaining high availability and security. If you want to control every aspect of Exchange Server 2013 and learn how to save time with PowerShell, then this cookbook is for you.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781849689427
Publisher:
Packt Publishing
Publication date:
06/16/2013
Pages:
504
Sales rank:
888,680
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.01(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Mike Pfeiffer has been in the IT field for over 13 years, spending most of his time as an enterprise consultant focused on Active Directory and Exchange implementation and migration projects. He is a Microsoft Certified Master on Exchange 2010, and a Microsoft Exchange MVP. You can find his writings online at mikepfeiffer.net, where he blogs regularly about Exchange Server and PowerShell-related topics.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 PowerShell Cookbook: Second Edition 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Boudville More than 1 year ago
The crucial part of the book explains PowerShell, which is Microsoft's fancy name for its custom command shell. Indeed, the book advises that if you have a unix background, a lot of PowerShell will be familiar. Take the unix shells like csh, sh and bash, and for that matter the linux bash. There is pipelining in PowerShell, just like in those shells. This lets you string together commands in a compact manner that can be easily understood. [Well at least once you get a minimum amount of experience.] Clearly, Microsoft is learning from the now 3 decades long experience of unix, and from the cumbersome nature of VMS, I suspect. The latter had no pipelining, and its shell scripts were far more verbose to write and debug. In fact, if you squint at the many PowerShell examples littered throughout this book, you might persuade yourself that you have stumbled onto another unix shell. The biggest stylistic difference is that the default commands that come with PowerShell often start with upper case letters. Whereas unix is distinguished by a massive deprecation of these. PowerShell also has conditional statements like 'if'. and it has a switch statement. Plus looping. All this adds up to a rudimentary grammar of a computer language. But it should be enough for scripting. That has been the experience of unix. You do not need too much here. Otherwise you should be writing in a true full language. Of course, most of the book deals with Exchange Server, now a very mature product. We see recipes [examples] of how to use PowerShell with it. To make management scripts automated tasks. Most readers will likely not need to read the book cover to cover. The contents should be detailed enough that you can quickly search for a possible recipe close to your needs. Hopefully, if you have to modify a recipe, the scripting and accompanying text will be clear enough to make this quick.