Misery Bay (Alex McKnight Series #8)

Misery Bay (Alex McKnight Series #8)

by Steve Hamilton
4.3 32

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Misery Bay (Alex McKnight Series #8) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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I love the Alex McKnight series.
shoegalTR More than 1 year ago
I love the Alex McKnight series. I picked up Misery Bay by accident at the book store and I could not put it down. I have now read all the McKnight books and can't wait to read the next. Steve Hamilton is my new favorite author and I hope he continues this series. Alex mcKnight is a character worth getting to know.
cate-k More than 1 year ago
I only recently discovered this author, and I very much enjoy his works. I especially like the Alex McKnight series. I like the way we are in Alex' head during the entire story and can "see" everything as it happens. This story is fast moving and interesting, and as usual I was rooting for Alex to save the day.
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gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
The first page of the newest book by Steve Hamilton, which brings the welcome return of Alex McKnight, describes a scene wherein the body of a young man is found hanging from a tree branch at the edge of a bay in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. For those new to the series, McKnight is a former Detroit cop and current holder of a p.i. license, although he protests that he ‘doesn’t do that anymore’: He owns and rents out cabins to ‘the snowmobile people’ in season. Three months after that first-page event takes place, McKnight is approached by Roy Maven, Chief of Police in “the Soo” [Sault St. Marie], who asks for his help. This from a man whose relationship with McKnight could at best be described as ‘fraught’ – as the Chief says, ‘just call it a persistent lack of liking each other.” The dead boy’s father had been Maven’s partner on the police force, and Maven wants McKnight to investigate the circumstances that could have led to what appears to have been a suicide. Having suffered horrendous personal losses himself – his partner on the Detroit police force, the woman he loved – there is no way this particular man could refuse. In what is perhaps the unlikeliest of alliances, McKnight agrees. The place where the body was found is the eponymous Misery Bay, a fitting enough name for the site itself and for what happened there, and a five-hour drive away from McKnight’s home on Lake Superior, in a town called Paradise. McKnight once again periodically turns to his friend Leon Prudell, the once and perhaps future p.i., for his unerring ability to point him in the right direction. The investigation takes some unpredictable turns, as more lives are lost and more still endangered. The writing is wonderful – no surprise here. The long, long winter of Paradise is once again made palpable by the author: “The sun went down. The wind picked up and started howling and I knew the wind chill would be something like thirty below. Another beautiful April night in Paradise. . . [where] springtime felt like a fairy tale.” [And I loved that the author tips his hat to fellow mystery writers, both from NYC: Reed Coleman and Jim Fusilli, both police sergeants in this incarnation.] As dark as the story line is, there is just enough humor injected into the writing and, as usual for this author, it is a sheer pleasure to read, and highly recommended. [It should perhaps be noted that the next book in the series, “Die a Stranger,” will be published by Minotaur in July 2012.]
corvettemary More than 1 year ago
I first read an article in the newspaper reviewing this book. It intrigued me. I liked the fact that the towns, roads, lakes, etc. were actually the "real" thing. Knowing Michigan as I do I could relate to streets, cities & expressways and actually follow a "visual" path of where the characters were driving. VERY good story with an unexpected twist in the end. Well worth the reading! I loved it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really enjoy all the books about Alex and the UP of Michigan.
RICK69MI More than 1 year ago
The old adage "Do what you do best" applies here. Hamilton stays in the UP and presents another excellent story.
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Well written and a good story. Definitely recommended.
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glauver More than 1 year ago
Steve Hamilton has returned to his Alex McKnight series after several years. The novel shifts the characters by teaming Alex with his nemesis Chief Roy Maven in a search for a killer of law enforcement officers. When we last saw McKnight (A Stolen Season) he had sunk deep in despair and tragedy. This novel begins his return to a life where hope is possible. The story is more thriller than mystery and the ending a bit out there but Hamilton keeps you interested in his protagonist, a man scarred by violence and tragedy.Few writers are better at writing terse prose that reminds you of Chandler, Hammett,and that other Michigan PI writer, Loren D. Estleman.
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