Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart

Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart

by Carol Wall

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Overview

Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart by Carol Wall

A true story of a unique friendship between two people who had nothing—and ultimately everything—in common.

Carol Wall, living in a lily-white neighborhood in Middle America, is at a crossroads in her life. Her children are grown; she has successfully overcome illness; her beloved parents are getting older. One day she notices a dark-skinned African man tending her neighbor’s yard. His name is Giles Owita. He bags groceries at the supermarket. He comes from Kenya. And he’s very good at gardening.
Before long Giles is transforming not only Carol’s yard, but her life. Though they are seemingly quite different, a caring bond grows between them. But Carol and Giles both hold long-buried secrets that, when revealed, will cement their friendship forever.

Includes a Readers Guide

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425273838
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/03/2015
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 319,486
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Carol Wall is a writer whose essays and articles have appeared over many years in Southern Living magazine and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. She lives on a tree-lined street in the heart of Middle America.

Read an Excerpt

***This excerpt is from an advance uncorrected proof.***

Copyright © 2014 by Helen Oyeyemi

Prologue

 

I never liked getting my hands dirty. This was one reason that our yard looked so sad. But there were other reasons, too— bigger reasons that were much harder to confront than brittle grass and overgrown bushes.

It’s not that I was ignoring our yard on purpose. Every once in a while we hired someone to plant or trim something. My husband, Dick, did his share of mowing. But he never did it happily. We weren’t yard-proud the way some people are. And when the kids were young, there was always something more important than yard work to do. Going to one of their games or events, running them to school and lessons, or shepherding them to doctor appointments—all those things ranked way higher on our list of priorities.

Once the kids were grown, I still managed to find more important things to do. I much preferred reading a book, or watching a documentary on TV, or going out to dinner with Dick to pruning a bush. I loved our house, and I enjoyed decorating the inside, but there was never anything about maintaining a house that I enjoyed. In some couples, one spouse makes up for the f laws of the other. But for better or worse, my beloved spouse and I shared the same f law in this department. Neither of us was handy. We ignored our loose front doorknob until it went from shaky to wobbly and finally fell off when we tried to exit the house one evening. Dick watched it fall to the hardwood floor with a thunk, then looked at me and said, “Time to move.”

I don’t think we were entirely wrong in holding on to our low-intervention policy. Once when Dick and I were walking through town, we were stopped by a group of young women who were celebrating their friend’s upcoming wedding. They were asking all the obviously married women they saw for advice for the new bride. I said, “You know, my life really began when I got married.” They all laughed and told me that I was the first woman they’d stopped who hadn’t said, “Don’t do it.” Then I told them that my best advice was not to approach marriage like it was an arrangement between property co-owners. It seemed to me like too many people spent too much of their time taking care of their houses instead of enjoying their spouses. And where was the fun in that?

I liked to think that it was a valid philosophy of life that kept me out of the yard, and not just sheer laziness. In any case, to me, even worse than digging out a screwdriver to fix our doorknob would have been digging in the dirt. I had zero interest in that area of our property. I don’t think I even really looked at it.

Then one day, I noticed that our yard had slowly, gradually transformed itself. No longer could I f latter myself that it was natural and unmanicured because that was the aesthetic I preferred. No, our yard wasn’t just rough around the edges. It had become a genuine embarrassment. Maybe we didn’t have the worst yard on the block. But we were close to it, and one good mowing in our most neglectful neighbor’s yard might easily nudge us into the bottom slot. And that just wouldn’t do. I might never have been yard-proud, but I did not want to be yard-ashamed.

So I decided that it was time to do something about this situation. It was a fixable problem, after all—and how nice it was to have one of those.

When I passed our neighbor Sarah’s yard I couldn’t help seeing what an amazing job her gardener had done. Sarah was a master gardener herself, but recently she’d gotten busy at work and had brought in some help. And even I could tell that a true artist was at work there. Maybe I could hire her gardener, I thought to myself. And then our yard would be as beautiful as hers. It would be healthy and lush and well taken care of—just the way I wanted to be myself.

A few days later I saw the mystery gardener in the flesh—the artist who’d wrought such a miracle transformation in my neighbor’s yard—and it was kismet. Love at first sight. No, it wasn’t the kind of love that causes you to question your marriage. It was the kind of love that causes you to question yourself. The kind that makes you want to be a better person. The kind that changes your life completely.

His name was Giles Owita, and from the start, something f lowered between us and around us. First he became my gardener, and then he became my friend. And while I knew from the moment I met him that he was something special—truly, I didn’t know the half of it.

Table of Contents

Prologue 1

1 Garden Angel 5

2 Of Particular Beauty Are the Azaleas 13

3 A Rose Between Two Thorns 21

4 A Promising Blade of Grass 39

5 Anticipated Blooms 67

6 Approaching Systems 85

7 The Canopy of the Yukon Gold Potato 91

8 Every Yard Must Have Its Flowers 103

9 Shades of White 113

10 The Perfect Christmas Tree 123

11 Frail Magnolia 137

12 Lemon 149

13 A Pretty Sky 167

14 Potted Plants and Fresh Flowers 175

15 Green Plants, Only 191

16 Impatiens 201

17 Gardening Seminars 211

18 Snow 219

19 Tomato Plants 231

20 Seedlings 237

21 The River 245

22 An Awkward Path 255

23 The Lilies of the Field 267

24 Rolling Waters 273

25 All the Things He Loved 281

Epilogue 285

Author's Note 289

Acknowledgments 291

What People are Saying About This

Kathleen Grissom

This memoir touches upon everything that is important in life. Not only is it beautifully written—I am also in awe of Carol Wall's raw honesty and incredible courage." -- Kathleen Grissom, New York Times—bestselling author of The Kitchen House

Steve Lopez

Carol Wall's suspenseful tale of human frailty and courage is a marvel. In her garden, an unexpected bond slowly forms as two people from distant worlds help each other confront long-buried secrets and fears. Deeply personal, poetic, and brimming with humanity, this is a book of lasting grace. --Steve Lopez, New York Times—bestselling author of The Soloist

Jonathan Odell

Carol Wall's disarming memoir Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening is a poignant tale of an unlikely teacher and a doubting student, who, by bringing a neglected patch of ground back to life, reveal the secrets of reclaiming, restoring, and freeing a wounded soul. It is a generous story filled with grace enough to bring healing to the reader as well. An engaging personal and spiritual journey into life's essential questions. --Jonathan Odell, author of The Healing

From the Publisher

 
“In this profoundly moving memoir, Owita teaches Wall how to find grace amid heartbreak and to accept that beauty exists because it is fleeting—as in her garden, as in life.” —People, 4 stars
 
“A perfect spring awakening.” —Good Housekeeping

“With her children grown and out of the house, Carol Wall is obsessed—perhaps overly so—with ripping out her azaleas. That is, until she meets a certain Giles Owita, Kenyan gardener, supermarket bagger, general-life philosopher and perhaps one of the most refined and gracious characters to ever hit the page (except that he’s real)… A warning for the shy: The basic goodness of Owita’s attitude may cause you to beam spontaneously as you read, leading to off looks from strangers at the coffee shop.” —Oprah.com
 
"No green thumb is required to enjoy the warmhearted pleasures of Carol Wall's moving memoir, Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening.... magnetically compelling ... Grace and gardening go hand-in-glove in this fine book about what really matters in life: friendship, kindness and watching a garden grow." —USA Today

"A pleasure to read. Wall’s bittersweet story of human kindness has universal appeal." —Kirkus Reviews

"I couldn’t put this book down. I found myself liking the principal characters from the opening pages, and my affection for them never wavered. If you enjoy inspirational memoirs or gardening books (or both), this moving account of a life-changing friendship is for you." —Bookpage

"A must-read memoir. On the surface, Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart by Carol Wall, is a gentle memoir about a friendship between a white woman in Roanoke, Virginia and her gardener from Kenya. But that description fails to capture the book's depth, its sometimes-raw emotions, nor its many surprising twists.... Both shocking and profoundly moving. This book is not just about gardening." —AARP blog
  “In this heartbreaking yet heartwarming paean to the joys of friendship and gardening, Wall crafts an elegiac tribute to an extraordinary man.” —Booklist 

"[T]his memoir chronicl[es] the many lasting rewards garnered from an unexpected friendship..." —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“This memoir touches upon everything that is important in life. Not only is it beautifully written—I am also in awe of Carol Wall’s raw honesty and incredible courage.”—Kathleen Grissom, New York Times–bestselling author of The Kitchen House

“Carol Wall’s suspenseful tale of human frailty and courage is a marvel. In her garden, an unexpected bond slowly forms as two people from distant worlds help each other confront long-buried secrets and fears. Deeply personal, poetic, and brimming with humanity, this is a book of lasting grace.” —Steve Lopez, New York Times–bestselling author of The Soloist

“Carol Wall’s disarming memoir Mister Owita’s Guide to Gardening is a poignant tale of an unlikely teacher and a doubting student, who, by bringing a neglected patch of ground back to life, reveal the secrets of reclaiming, restoring, and freeing a wounded soul. It is a generous story filled with grace enough to bring healing to the reader as well. An engaging personal and spiritual journey into life’s essential questions.” —Jonathan Odell, author of The Healing
 

Customer Reviews

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Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great story line. Well written and engaging. One of best books of 2014. And I have read over 25 this year.
mrszoomby More than 1 year ago
Right away I fell in love with this book – even though it is, strictly speaking, not a gardening book. Instead it tells the story of a woman who is grappling with cancer, age and her life in general. Carol can be quite a whingey whiner but her struggles are real and you cannot help but be pulled into her life. And, heck, aren’t we all a bit pompous and self important within our own internal monologue? On the other hand, Giles is one of those people everyone aspires to be. He is kind, thoughtful and loyal to his friends and family. He is also struggling with issues in his life and deals with them in a completely different way to Carol. At times I found this book a struggle to read. Not because it was awful, but because of the raw emotion the author manages to evoke in the reader. I cried at several points through this book (and once while sitting at the bus stop), but the story was worth every heartrending tear! While I loved this book and it tugged at me emotionally, I found, at times, the characters supporting the two main characters were not given much justice. They appeared as Carol and Giles needed them and then disappeared without consequence afterwards. I really would have liked to see a more personal interaction between the main characters and the supporting ones. Overall, I am giving Mister Owita’s Guide to Gardening by Carol Wall 4 out of 5 stars. make sure you have the tissues ready though!
lovinglifesm More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book, both heartwarming and heartbreaking. One of the best books I have read in a long time. It gives you pause for reflection on your own life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thats will help a lot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book; could not put it down. Beautifully well-written. I wish I had known Giles but almost feel I have, indeed, known him after reading this lovely memoir. Kudos to the author!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Carol Wall has written a candid story -- withholding few of her character deflects, and knitting them together with a blossoming tale of friendship -- cross-cultural, perhaps, but vibrant and life-changing, and HOPE-full. The context is how she learned to garden, and love the adventure under the tutoring of a master gardener who graciously accepted handicaps and afflictions -- managing to maintain his composure through very tough times. By their friendship and the the associations their two families formed, Carol Wall learned how to accept different but equally harsh things without wilting. It is best summed up by Giles Owita's last words: "In every moment there exists a lifetime. Every day brings something good." It is an charming, convicting, and comforting -- an easy read -- but an unforgettable one.
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