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Modern Bodies: Dance and American Modernism from Martha Graham to Alvin Ailey / Edition 1
     

Modern Bodies: Dance and American Modernism from Martha Graham to Alvin Ailey / Edition 1

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by Julia L. Foulkes
 

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ISBN-10: 0807853674

ISBN-13: 9780807853672

Pub. Date: 09/09/2002

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

In 1930, dancer and choreographer Martha Graham proclaimed the arrival of "dance as an art of and from America." Dancers such as Doris Humphrey, Ted Shawn, Katherine Dunham, and Helen Tamiris joined Graham in creating a new form of dance, and, like other modernists, they experimented with and argued over their aesthetic innovations, to which they assigned great

Overview

In 1930, dancer and choreographer Martha Graham proclaimed the arrival of "dance as an art of and from America." Dancers such as Doris Humphrey, Ted Shawn, Katherine Dunham, and Helen Tamiris joined Graham in creating a new form of dance, and, like other modernists, they experimented with and argued over their aesthetic innovations, to which they assigned great meaning.

Their innovations, however, went beyond aesthetics. While modern dancers devised new ways of moving bodies in accordance with many modernist principles, their artistry was indelibly shaped by their place in society. Modern dance was distinct from other artistic genres in terms of the people it attracted: white women (many of whom were Jewish), gay men, and African American men and women. Women held leading roles in the development of modern dance on stage and off; gay men recast the effeminacy often associated with dance into a hardened, heroic, American athleticism; and African Americans contributed elements of social, African, and Caribbean dance, even as their undervalued role defined the limits of modern dancers' communal visions. Through their art, modern dancers challenged conventional roles and images of gender, sexuality, race, class, and regionalism with a view of American democracy that was confrontational and participatory, authorial and populist.

Modern Bodies exposes the social dynamics that shaped American modernism and moved modern dance to the edges of society, a place both provocative and perilous.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807853672
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
09/09/2002
Series:
Cultural Studies of the United States Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.80(d)

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Modern Bodies: Dance and American Modernism from Martha Graham to Alvin Ailey 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Humming she walked up the stairs onto her porch and into the house. It was auite and peaceful and full of memories...hot memories.. she shook her head and closed the door. Tossing her keys on the nearby table. Kicking off her shoes and taking off her jacket she walked barefooted over to the fridge for a drink. She accidentlt knocked tea over her white blouse and groaned. "My best blouse!" She sighed and went up stairs to change. Slipping out of her black work pants and soiled blouse she changed into red pajama shorts and a white T. Letting her hair down from its pins she shook it loose and padded barefooted downstairs once more before grabbing her tea and sat on the couch to read.