Modernism and Morality: Ethical Devices in European and American Fiction

Modernism and Morality: Ethical Devices in European and American Fiction

by M. Halliwell

Hardcover(2001)

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Overview

Modernism and Morality: Ethical Devices in European and American Fiction by M. Halliwell

Modernism and Morality discusses the relationship between artistic and moral ideas in European and American literary modernism. Rather than reading modernism as a complete rejection of social morality, this study shows how early twentieth-century writers like Conrad, Faulkner, Gide, Kafka, Mann and Stein actually devised new aesthetic techniques to address ethical problems. By focusing on a range of decadent, naturalist, avant-garde and expatriate writers between 1890 and the late 1930s this book reassesses the moral trajectory of transatlantic fiction.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780333918845
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan UK
Publication date: 09/12/2001
Edition description: 2001
Pages: 264
Product dimensions: 5.51(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.03(d)

About the Author

Martin Halliwell is Lecturer in English and American Studies at the University of Leicester.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements Introduction: Modernity and the Crisis of Morals PART I: NATURALISM AND DECADENCE Decadence, Naturalism and the Morality of Writing (Huysmans, Wilde, Norris, Wharton) Books and Ruins: Abject Decadence in Gide and Mann PART II: SYMBOLIC CENTRES OF MODERISM Extremist Modernism: The Avant-Garde and the Limits of Art (Tzara, Huelsenbeck, Breton, Aragon) Moral Regeneration and Moral Bankruptcy: Conrad, Faulkner and Idiocy PART III: SEXUAL AND CULTURAL DIFFERENCE American Expatriate Fictions and the Ethics of Sexual Difference (Stein, Hemingway, Miller, Nin) The Blind Impress of Modernity: Lorca, Kafka and New York PART IV: MODERNIST TRICKERY The Modernist Picaresque: Moralists without Qualities (Musil, Hesse, Hurston, Roth) Myths of the Magician: Klaus and Thomas Mann in Nazi Germany Conclusion: Liberating the Fear of Modernity Endnotes Bibliography Index

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