×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Moira Orfei in Aigues-Mortes
     

Moira Orfei in Aigues-Mortes

by Wayne Koestenbaum
 

Five years of breakdown separate pianist Theo Mangrove’s last recital in Europe from his planned comeback in Aigues-Mortes, "the town of dead water." At home in tiny East Kills, NY, Theo begins jotting in 25 notebooks, purchased all at once and addressed to his mother. Theo’s wife, aside from servicing two of Theo’s twenty daily erections, will

Overview

Five years of breakdown separate pianist Theo Mangrove’s last recital in Europe from his planned comeback in Aigues-Mortes, "the town of dead water." At home in tiny East Kills, NY, Theo begins jotting in 25 notebooks, purchased all at once and addressed to his mother. Theo’s wife, aside from servicing two of Theo’s twenty daily erections, will have nothing to do with him. The other eighteen—taken care of by male hustlers, random strangers in YMCA locker-rooms and naked piano students—contribute to Theo’s sense of dissolution as his "comeback" approaches. Overcome with the belief that Moira Orfei, queen of the Italian circus during the 1960’s, must perform with him, Theo begins to write to her and to pen what may or may not be her cryptic replies into his notebooks. In a fugue of notes and troubling memories, Theo prepares for Aigues-Mortes, struggling with Moira’s guidance towards one final, full celebration of "the partial, the flawed, the almost, the not quite." Peopled by piano playing relatives, prostitutes, muses and manipulators; poet and cultural critic Wayne Koestenbaum’s first novel shines a hot light on the treacherous crossroads of sex, death, family and popular culture.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
From poet and cultural critic Koestenbaum (The Queen's Throat: Opera, Homosexuality, and the Mystery of Desire, 1993, etc.), a first novel made up of the lunatic rantings of ailing concert pianist Theo Mangrove. It's quite a load for any man to bear. The doomed narrator is saddled with the prospect of tragic artistic failure, an Oedipal fixation on his mother, Alma (whose international fame as a pianist eclipses his own), a passing sexual interest in his sister Tanaquil (whose dream is "to be a madam in an important bordello"), and a polysexual perversity that requires him to relieve 20 erections daily, a feat he's aided in by street hustlers, students and teachers (of all ages and both sexes) and also, astonishingly, by his wife ("Unsurprisingly," he tells us, "I present HIV symptoms," yet, surprisingly, both he and his generous supply of partners have a consistently cavalier disregard for protection.) Naturally, there's a great deal of description of sexual entrances and exits of all sorts, much of it coated in an oddly nonsensical lyricism ("After an intense orgasm we produce voice from our head rather than our chest"). Koestenbaum is best known for his booklength rhapsodies on iconic women (Jackie Onassis, Maria Callas, etc.) and the gay men who love them. Thus, Theo, too, has an obsession with an icon: the Italian circus artist Moira Orfei, with whom he is determined to collaborate on a "comeback" recital to be given in the small French town of Aigues-Mortes. The novel, written in the form of "notebooks" addressed to Theo's mother, includes letters to Moira and what may or may not be her own replies, written in the same inscrutable diction as a semiotics student after a three-dayecstasy binge: "My needs and destiny exceed yours. I command more land, more syntax."Koestenbaum may be reaching to combine the mad genius of Pale Fire with the florid outlaw sexuality of Jean Genet, but his narrator has neither the wit of the former nor the nuance of the latter.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932360530
Publisher:
Soft Skull Press, Inc.
Publication date:
10/10/2004
Pages:
214
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 10.22(h) x 0.59(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews