The Monster in the Box (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #22)

The Monster in the Box (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #22)

by Ruth Rendell
3.5 14

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Monster in the Box (Chief Inspector Wexford Series #22) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MD53 More than 1 year ago
Ruth Rendell can always be depended on for a good mystery. This one doesn't fail.
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DJWardell More than 1 year ago
As with many "final" books in a lengthy series, some of the material is lost on those who have not followed prior books. The characters here are classic Rendell and the plot is engaging and well-developed. Criticisms about silly dialogue and slow pace or development are themselves "silly" comments--Rendell develops many of her books in a deliberate manner. The major "problems" (if that is the right word) is Rendell's need to weave perceived topical social problems into the storyline (particularly in her later books). It just doesn't work that well and accounts for some of the "drag." Long-time Rendell readers realize that you have to accept this for what it is and enjoy the story anyway. The audio production is adequate. Despite other criticisms, the narration is well-done by a competent actor. The only notable problem is that he hasn't a clue how to do a Cornish accent--and didn't take time to find out. The audio editing is downright sloppy--more than once lengthy "outtakes" were left in the final cut. Not a sufficient reason to avoid the audio version, just a bad reflection on Phoenix Books.
murflaw More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. References to Wexfords past would probably be more interesting to those of us who have read every book in this series. Nonetheless, Rendell once again weaves a very fine tale of intrigue. This book was not gripping in the sense that once I started it I couldn't put it down. However, I looked forward to sitting down at the end of the day and reading more of it. Wexford is evolving through life, slowing down a wee bit (but not mentally), and I think it is only fitting that there are some flashbacks to his earlier life. I have read everything Rendell has written, including her Barbara Vine books. She is one of my favorite writers.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rendell fans will be hard-pressed to recognize this as her work at all, for the first 50-75 pages. The story drags, even though the complex and interesting Inspector Wexford is still the central character, as Rendell fills pages with silly dialogue as opposed to building a suspenseful story. Midway through the book, the true Rendell emerges and the mystery elevates to what should be expected from this fine author.
JessLucy More than 1 year ago
I love the Inspector Wexford novels as they are psychological thrillers and very well written. It was interesting to have a look into Wexford's past throughout the book. Rendell is certainly a master at her craft; she writes like a dream. You may also like End in Tears and Not in the Flesh, by the same author; as well as the novels she writes under the name Barbara Vine. Acid Row, The Devil's Feather and The Shape of Snakes are also wonderful books by another English writer: Minette Walters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read a few of Ruth Rendell's novels. Some I've liked quite a bit; others not so much. This one falls in the latter category. Much of this story involves Wexler recalling events from his youth, but I began to tire of the author's constant references to the way things used to be as opposed to how they are now. There were also times when she seemed to feel it necessary to explain things too much to her American readership. For example, describing the autumn colors in her setting was fine, but then she adds that there are no reds in the leaves in England, and that you only find those in North America where they have maple trees. Who cares? The book cover is what drew me to read this one, but it really had nothing to do with the story. I may read more of her books, but I'll likely avoid the Inspector Wexler ones.