Moon Bear

Moon Bear

by Brenda Z. Guiberson, Ed Young
4.5 2

NOOK Book(NOOK Kids)

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Overview

Moon Bear by Brenda Z. Guiberson, Ed Young

Moon Bears, or Asiatic black bears, are so named because of the white moon-shaped blaze on their chests. The moon bears are seldom seen but their footprints, claw marks, hair, and bear nests high in the trees give us clues about how they live. Sadly, there are now more moon bears in captivity than in the wild, as these animals are being "farmed" for their commercially valuable bile.

Brenda Guiberson's lyrical text and Ed Young's stunning illustrations combine in a winning tribute to this endagered species. Follow one moon bear in the wild as she eats, plays, hibernates, and wakes up again in the spring.

Moon Bear is a 2011 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781466811188
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date: 06/11/2013
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 40
File size: 23 MB
Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Brenda Z. Guiberson has written many books for children, including Cactus Hotel, Spoonbill Swamp, and Disasters. As a child, Brenda never thought she wanted to be a writer—her dreams tended more toward jungle explorer. She graduated from the University of Washington with degrees in English and Fine Art. She started thinking about writing for children when her son went to elementary school, and she volunteered in his class and in the school library. After taking exciting trips that involved a fifty-foot cactus, hungry alligators and sunset-colored spoonbills, she wanted to create books for children that would be like a field trip. Her books are full of well-researched detail, and Brenda sees this research as an adventure—one that allows her to be a jungle explorer at last. She lives in Seattle, Washington.

Ed Young is a Caldecott Medalist, a two-time Caldecott Honor Book artist, and has twice been nominated for the Hans Christian Andersen Award. He has illustrated many books for children, including Cat and Rat.


Brenda Z. Guiberson has written many books for children, including Cactus Hotel, Spoonbill Swamp, Moon Bear and Disasters. As a child, Brenda never thought she wanted to be a writer—her dreams tended more toward jungle explorer. She graduated from the University of Washington with degrees in English and Fine Art. She started thinking about writing for children when her son went to elementary school, and she volunteered in his class and in the school library. After taking exciting trips that involved a fifty-foot cactus, hungry alligators and sunset-colored spoonbills, she wanted to create books for children that would be like a field trip. Her books are full of well-researched detail, and Brenda sees this research as an adventure—one that allows her to be a jungle explorer at last. She lives in Seattle, Washington.
Ed Young was born in China and spent his childhood in Shanghai. The illustrator of many books for children, he has received numerous awards, including a Caldecott Medal for his book Lon Po Po, and two Caldecott Honors for The Emperor and the Kite and Seven Blind Mice. He was twice nominated for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal, the highest international recognition given to children's book authors and illustrators who have made a lasting contribution to children's literature. Ed Young lives in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.

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Moon Bear 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an absolutely breathtaking book. Ed Young's artwork is amazing. Children will be captivated by this lovely picturebook and most certainly want to learn more about this magnificent animal.
Sue_Corbett More than 1 year ago
The "Moon Bear" is an (endangered) Asiatic Black Bear so beautiful it seems almost like a magical creature - inky black, with white crescent accents, hence its nickname. In fact, if there is a weakness to this book it's that as good as Ed Young is, his collages don't really convey as well as the photographs at the back (or the video trailer, found elsewhere on this page) how exquisite a creature the moon bear is.That said, this is a worthy book that will enchant animal lovers among the lap-sit crowd. Guiberson's text reads like haiku as she follows the quotidian path of the moon bear: awakening, eating, foraging (so they can eat some more), napping. (This is the life for me: eat rest eat rest eat rest. Where can I line up work like this?) She answers the old rhetorical question about what bears do in the woods with finesse: "Who plucks raspberries / and plops red scat in the tangle? Blissful moon bear, / feasting on juicy summer fruit." (Although you'll probably have to explain to little listeners what "scat" is, they'll love that detail, no doubt.) An author's note includes information about the ways in which people are trying to keep the species from going extinct, which includes the creators of this book's decision to donate a portion of the profits to the Animals Asia Foundation, which works to prevent the poaching that has threatened the moon bear's existence.