Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America's Apollo Moon Landings

Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America's Apollo Moon Landings

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Overview

Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America's Apollo Moon Landings by Jay Barbree, Alan Shepard, Deke Slayton

A revised edition of the New York Times bestselling classic: the epic story of the golden years of American space exploration, told by the men who rode the rockets
On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik I, and the space race was born. Desperate to beat the Russians into space, NASA put together a crew of the nation’s most daring test pilots: the seven men who were to lead America to the moon. The first into space was Alan Shepard; the last was Deke Slayton, whose irregular heartbeat kept him grounded until 1975. They spent the 1960s at the forefront of NASA’s effort to conquer space, and Moon Shot is their inside account of what many call the twentieth century’s greatest feat—landing humans on another world. Collaborating with NBC’s veteran space reporter Jay Barbree, Shepard and Slayton narrate in gripping detail the story of America’s space exploration from the time of Shepard’s first flight until he and eleven others had walked on the moon.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781453211922
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 05/03/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 398
Sales rank: 107,885
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

As one of the original seven Mercury astronauts, Alan Shepard (1923–1998) became the first American in space on May 5, 1961, and a decade later took, with his partner Edgar Mitchell, the longest walk—two miles—on the moon before hitting a golf ball for miles and miles across the lunar landscape. Another Mercury astronaut, Deke Slayton (1924–1993) was meant to be the second American in Earth orbit, but was grounded because of an irregular heartbeat. He stayed on at NASA to supervise his fellow astronauts and was returned to flight status in 1972.  In 1975, after sixteen years as head of the astronaut office, Slayton made it into space for the historic first docking of an American and a Russian spacecraft, a step that was a long stride on the road to end the Cold War. Jay Barbree (b. 1933) is the author of eight books and has been NBC’s space correspondent since the birth of NASA. He shared an Emmy Award for NBC’s coverage of Apollo 11’s first landing on the moon, and is a recipient of NASA’s highest medal for Exceptional Public Service.
As one of the original seven Mercury astronauts, Alan Shepard (1923–1998) became the first American in space on May 5, 1961, and a decade later took, with his partner Edgar Mitchell, the longest walk—two miles—on the moon before hitting a golf ball for miles and miles across the lunar landscape.

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Moon Shot: The Inside Story of America's Apollo Moon Landings 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 41 reviews.
rfortson More than 1 year ago
I read this when it first came out. It's a great inside look at the early space program up through Apollo 14 (Shepard's last flight). This was also the basis for a TBS series in the early 90's. Interesting read, recommended to any that like space.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I grew up during the years of the United States' developing space program and it's race against the Russians, but this book added so much more information than I could have ever read in newspapers and magazines at that time. It is excellent reading and hard to put down! Many of the events featured were told in incredible details. I can highly recommend this book for anyone who is somewhat familiar with the past events in the U.S. space program, or who knows very little. Great entertainment and very informative!
Rick Slusher More than 1 year ago
I have followed America's space program since the days of Mercury. This book offers insight from two who were there from the beginning through the end of Apollo. The descriptions offered of sitting on the launch pad, of walking on the moon, and of just experiencing first-hand space travel were enthralling. I recommend this to anyone who grew up with the space program, and to those who are discovering it for the first time.
Mr_Kandyman More than 1 year ago
"Moon Shot" tells the story of NASA's attempt to get to the moon from the perspectives of Al Shepard and Deke Slayton, two of the original Mercury 7 astronauts. Although I find the recollections enjoyable, it's nothing I haven't read before. There is no information or anecdotes in this book that aren't covered in the plethora of other books and documentaries about the space program. Also, no events or topics are covered in enough detail, and are usually washed over in a few pages. I often wanted to hear more about particular events, only to be let down when the author moves on to a new topic. I imagine this book would be much better if you knew nothing about NASA. If you want to read a great book about the glory days of the US Space program, read "Failure is Not an Option" by Gene Krantz.
wfcress More than 1 year ago
If you remember anything about the original Mercury astronauts, or if you just want to know why us old folks get so excited reminissing about it, you have to read this book. You get a real feel for the people, and you learn a lot of detail that you may have missed in the 60's and 70's when many of the events happened. i highly recommend this book.
JEFFERY PYNDUSS More than 1 year ago
Good read, learned a lot about the history and people that founded Americas space program.
BrianIndianFan More than 1 year ago
In the early 70s as an elementary school student, I had a huge interest in the space program. My teacher also noticed that I was quite gifted academically. My principal - Mr. McClimans - pulled me out of class and escorted me to a room with only a TV in it. I was permitted to watch as much or as little of the Apollo coverage as I desired. Forty years later, Moon Shot brings back many of the events I witnessed on that Hempfield Elementary TV all those years ago. Jay Barbree of NBC News assisted former astronaut Alan Shepard in the writing of the book, while Donald "Deke" Slayon is also listed as an author, he passed away before the book's completion in 1994. The book is a pretty straight-forward telling of the space race, initially as the Soviet Union wins the race to space and later as America lands on the moon first. The fact that it is written by Shepard means that a lot of the stories in the book focus on him and his friend Deke Slayton and their struggles to reach into space after each developed medical problems that grounded them from the space program - 16 years in Slayton's case. Slayton's only mission came almost as an afterthought in the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975. I am personally reluctant to call this a true historical account, inasmuch as a strong plurality of the book is dedicated to Shepard and Slayton. Other notable events are included, such as the tragic Apollo 1 fire, but many of these events have either Shepard and/or Slayton as accessories to the story. Mind you, I don't consider these failings; it is that I wish to convey that you're not getting the whole history of this time period in American history. The Soviet portion of this story does help fill in some personal gaps I had about their program during this time period. However, it could have used more information as to what was happening with their lunar program. Given that the book was written in 1994 shortly after the demise of the Soviet Union, such information may not have been available at that time. BOTTOM LINE: A good primer for those who are too young to remember, and a walk down memory lane for those of us who do.
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