The Mote in God's Eye (Mote Series #1)

The Mote in God's Eye (Mote Series #1)

by Larry Niven
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Overview

The Mote in God's Eye (Mote Series #1) by Larry Niven

Writing separately, Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle are responsible for a number of science fiction classics, such as the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning Ringworld, Debt of Honor,and The Integral Trees. Together they have written the critically acclaimed bestsellers Inferno, Footfall, and The Legacy of Heorot,among others.
The Mote In God's Eye is their acknowledged masterpiece, an epic novel of mankind's first encounter with alien life that transcends the genre.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780671660543
Publisher: Pocket Books
Publication date: 09/20/1975
Series: Mote Series , #1

About the Author

Larry Niven (left) is the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author of such classics as Ringworld, The Integral Trees, and Destiny's Road. He has also collaborated with both Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes on The Legacy of Heorot, Beowulf's Children, and the bestselling Dream Park series. He lives in Chatsworth, California.
Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle were the joint winners of the 2005 Robert A. Heinlein Award.

Jerry Pournelle (right), a past winner of the John W. Campbell Award, has collaborated with Niven on numerous bestsellers. He has also written such successful solo novels as Janissaries and Starswarm. He lives in Studio City, California.
Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle were the joint winners of the 2005 Robert A. Heinlein Award.

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Mote in God's Eye 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 102 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can't believe I went so long without reading this. A truly magnificent SciFi book. Well worth your time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was looking for a book that involved first contact with an alien species. This one was recommend several times as a book that deviates from the usual "the aliens find us first" approach. I enjoyed it very much and loved how the interactions between two very different species, both physically and culturally, played out.
TXWeisberg More than 1 year ago
This was the first of several science fiction books that left me awe-struck and the first book that I kept to re-read to appreciate its nuances as well as the chance to gage my reading evaluation skills. The premise of a second chance for a controlled first contact with a technological near equal  is fantastic and well developed.  This collaboration was made the stronger by the careful selection of characters and voices by each author.  We are playing in Pournelle's future post-"Co-Dominion" universe until we enter the Motie system.  Niven's voice/personality is given a "seat" on-board the battle-cruiser MacArthur - the prime setting  for much of the story in the role of Sailing Master Renner. From this point forward, Niven's writing becomes more apparent.  Character development is much better than typically found in SF stories - especially when one's SF diet began with Asimov's Foundation series.  Please note that this book was published during the mid-1970's and that some of the writing team's social attitudes may seem a bit dated after nearly forty years in print.   Please don't let this point of view get in the way of reading one of the strongest first contact novels that I have read..
wookietim More than 1 year ago
And I say 'science fiction' as opposed to 'sci fi' for a reason. This book is about big ideas rather than battles, it presents a truly alien species rather than monsters. It deserves its classification as classic. It has a bevy of well developed characters and its plot moves from one phase to the next with impeccable logic and style. But if there wad one thing that held this back from getting five stars rather than just four it was the characters. I liked them all and they are all fun to spend time with... but half of them are not needed for the plot. Their contributions could have been made by lesser characters and the book would have been half its length. It was fun getting to know them... but we didn't need them. But still this book is a must read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I agree that the beginning is slow - but so is the classic Victorian narrative style - but the effort is well rewarded with a story strong in both major and minor elements. Major, the universe that is created is rich and varied, with an alien culture that is based on some truly unique premises. The authors do not shy away from some very central and provocative topics, key to the existence of any species and especially problematic to a sentient one. Minor, in the elements of daily life - such as the handheld computer, which has since come into being much as Niven and Pournelle envisioned it (i.e. the Pocket PC with wireless access). I've read this book several times and gained more from each reading. And as with all truly great SF novels, we learn more about ourselves from the 'outside' view the authors posit. I don't want to give away too much, but once you've read this, think about some predominant religions' position on sex and reproduction.... There are many possible endings that would have trivialized this book, and it's my opinion that the authors avoided them successfully. Their conclusion is plausible and thought-provoking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Like Dune or Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, a fictional universe is created. Very enjoyable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LAB54 More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite novels of any genre. Yes, it's science fiction, and, yes, it's about contacts with aliens from space, but it's also about our actions and reactions to alien cultures just generally. Much of the human thinking and acts mirrors those of the U.S. in response to 19th and 20th Century immigration of Chinese, Irish, Jewish, and other nationals. It's a fascinating book, well-written, serious yet humorous -- a great read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MrAndre76 More than 1 year ago
I found the book tedious at times.  Why say something in 300 pages when you can say it in 550 pages.  It was creative and imaginative and at times, I found I could not put it down.   I think it's a great story and well told.  It was obviously written in the seventies.  reading it in 2015 I chuckled at the lack of technology several millennium in the future.  I think with a major update/rewrite this book could have a whole new life.        
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Halykan More than 1 year ago
It's well-thought out and they really show their work. Assuming you're a fan of their other collaborations, or hard SF in general, you'll definitely love this one. It's also got a fascinating world and culture that they've built, both on the human side and the Moties, so I'd imagine pretty much any science fiction fan will enjoy it.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was slow to start, then I discovered that it was about humans first contact with intellengent life from another planet.I was hooked. It was a good story line, the charters were under developed and the ending was a disapointment. Two good scfi writers were one to many for this book. I do not recomend wasting your time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you enjoy sci-fi this book is a must read. I usually read fantasy, horror or sci-fi and just came across this novel not knowing it's place among great space storys. The storyline deveops at moderate pace then changing into a juicy space tale, really holds your attention. I've since realized this book is one of the great sci-fi novels, not to be missed by fans of this genre.