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Mother Goose's Little Treasures
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Mother Goose's Little Treasures

by Iona Opie, Rosemary Wells (Illustrator)
 

The world’s most respected Mother Goose folklorist reunites with one of the great illustrators of our time to present a rare selection of rhymes to share and treasure.

From the far reaches of shared memory come these charming but little-known nursery rhymes, mysterious tidbits of lore brought back to shining life by the shared talents of the two most

Overview

The world’s most respected Mother Goose folklorist reunites with one of the great illustrators of our time to present a rare selection of rhymes to share and treasure.

From the far reaches of shared memory come these charming but little-known nursery rhymes, mysterious tidbits of lore brought back to shining life by the shared talents of the two most beloved Mother Goose treasurers, Iona Opie and Rosemary Wells. MOTHER GOOSE'S LITTLE TREASURES is a gem in itself, allowing the littlest listeners — and the most discerning collectors — to discover a selection of marvelous rare nursery rhymes made new again.

From the Introduction:

These rhymes are a confirmation that though we must live in the real world, we need to know the way to another world, where there are no limits and nothing is certain. . . .

Just turn the pages, and look and listen, and say, as I do, Oh yes, oh yes, of course!

— Iona Opie

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Opie and Wells depart from their previous two collections of well-known Mother Goose rhymes to venture to what Opie describes as "the far edge of Mother Goose's realm" and there collect "the most mysterious fragments from our shared memory." As if to signal the difference, the trim size has changed (it is smaller, at 9 × 9) and the paper is matte, not glossy. Despite the large fonts and the continued presence of Wells's signature bunny characters, however, this is less a title for Everytoddler than one for lovers of rhyme and verse. Wells gives the art a more sophisticated look, trading the bright colors and bustling borders of the previous books for a more subdued palette and adding many more human characters. She riffs on designs of classic Mother Goose editions, playing with fonts and narrow frames, and she outdoes herself in ingenious interpretations. One verse beseeches a "chick chick chick chick chicken" to "lay a little egg for me"; Wells depicts a rustically dressed bunny and a chicken in the same room, each on its own telephone, a speech balloon issuing from the bunny's receiver shows a brightly painted egg. An especially fine series of pictures features a human mother, daughter and doll, all identically dressed; sometimes only one of the trio appears, introducing jokes about scale, but the funniest include all three, as in the art for a contradictory poem about a mother who tells her "darling daughter" that yes, she can go swimming as long as she doesn't go near the water (the look on the daughter's face as she wades into a pond is pure imp; the doll, towed in a toy boat, mirrors the girl's expression except for its eyes, which roll angelically heavenward). Sadly, theart suffers in the production-low contrasts leave the watercolors looking washed out. Ages 3-up. (Sept.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
School Library Journal

PreS
This third collection by Opie and Wells includes 22 less-familiar rhymes. According to Opie's introduction, " . . . the little treasures in this book . . . are the most mysterious fragments of our shared memory." Some rhymes are silly ("Little old dog sits under a chair,/Twenty-five grasshoppers/snarled in his hair . . . .") Others are surreal. For example, "Mother, May I?" poses the question, "Mother, may I go out swimming?," which is answered, "Yes, my darling daughter;/Hang your clothes on a hickory limb,/But don't go near the water." Meanwhile, the picture shows a little girl, waist-deep in a pool, pulling a little boat and holding a doll that looks just like the little girl, which does transform this playful verse into something, yes, mysterious. Many of the characters make multiple appearances, and many are Wells's characteristic rabbits and cats. The very nature of this book makes it a less-essential purchase than this team's My Very First Mother Goose (1996) or Here Comes Mother Goose (1999, both Candlewick), so possibly only larger collections or libraries with lots of Rosemary Wells fans will want it.
—Lauralyn PerssonCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763636555
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
08/28/2007
Series:
My Very First Mother Goose Series
Pages:
56
Sales rank:
1,384,413
Product dimensions:
9.31(w) x 9.29(h) x 0.51(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Iona Opie has dedicated her life to collecting and preserving children’s rhymes as an art form. "Nursery rhymes are good for you," she says. "If you acquire a nursery rhyme-ical attitude, you’re not at all put out by life’s little bumps and bruises — they just seem funny and entirely normal." Iona Opie lives in Hampshire, England.

Rosemary Wells is the author and illustrator of more than sixty books for young readers and has received many awards, including a NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW Best Illustrated Book Award, a BOSTON GLOBE-HORN BOOK Award, and the inaugural Carle Honors Artist Award for lifetime achievement. She lives in Greenwich, Connecticut.

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