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Mountains: The Tops of the World
     

Mountains: The Tops of the World

by David L. Harrison, Cheryl Nathan (Illustrator)
 

How do fossils of fish reach the tops of mountains? The explanation of this and other natural phenomena is found in this lively introduction to the geology of mountains. Mountains can be created by the collision of tectonic plates, those massive slabs of rock so big they can carry continents and oceans on their backs. They can also be created by volcanic magma that

Overview

How do fossils of fish reach the tops of mountains? The explanation of this and other natural phenomena is found in this lively introduction to the geology of mountains. Mountains can be created by the collision of tectonic plates, those massive slabs of rock so big they can carry continents and oceans on their backs. They can also be created by volcanic magma that spews from the Earth. The story of mountains is one of Planet Earth's great dramas. And it all began a billion years ago, when all the land on the earth was clustered into one continent that scientists call Rodinia.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This title begins by going back two-hundred million years ago naming the forming layers of earth, layer by layer, until we reach today's ever-changing earth topography. The text is beautifully illustrated and easy to follow with questions readers may have answered by an adult. This nonfiction book would be a great resource for a classroom or library to aid in understanding the earth's composition. Although the publishers recommend a five- to eight-year reading level, it seems more appropriate for an older child. Younger children who are gifted, a child interested in earth science, or a student who needs a book report or reference for geography may appreciate this book. 2005, Boyds Mill Press, Ages 8 to 12.
—Charlotte M. Krall
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-Beginning with the question of how a fish can wind up on a mountaintop, this picture book explores such concepts as sedimentation, plate tectonics, and the changing face of the planet. Lush, full-color artwork lends a fantasy aspect to serious scientific information. However, some of the concepts may be too difficult to understand without adult explanations. "Some plates collide, and one is forced under the other. The bottom edge slides into the mantle, where it melts and is called magma." Although accompanied by labeled illustrations, this is still a highly difficult idea for children to conceptualize. With help, their interest may be piqued enough for them to ask questions.-Eva Elisabeth VonAncken, Trinity-Pawling School, Pawling, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
How does the fossil of an ocean fish end up on a mountaintop? This question, posed only on the jacket flap, is answered by this simplified description of basic geological processes, introducing plate tectonics, mountain building, erosion and the formation of sedimentary rocks and making the point that mountains don't last forever. The smooth text is broken up into short phrases and vocabulary is defined in context, but the intended audience will struggle with words like "sedimentary" and "tectonic." Harrison concludes with an author's note directed at an older reader whose help may well be needed. Clean and colorful, the stylized illustrations give an almost three-dimensional look to each double-page spread. They support and amplify the text, except for the page showing men riding horses on a dry Western landscape while the words describe people hiking and fishing in the woods (as shown on the cover). Like others in the Earthworks series, suggestions for further reading are similar topic books; there is no glossary or index. An attractive introduction. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590783269
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
10/28/2005
Series:
Earth Works Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

David L. Harrison has written sixty-five books of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, including five previous Earthworks titles. Winner of the Christopher Award, David lives in Springfield, Missouri.

Cheryl Nathan has illustrated a number of nature books for children. Her art has been exhibited in galleries in Florida and has won recognition from the Society of Illustrators.

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