Mounting Fears (Will Lee Series #6)

Mounting Fears (Will Lee Series #6)

by Stuart Woods
3.2 39

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged, 6 CDs)

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Overview

Mounting Fears (Will Lee Series #6) by Stuart Woods

Unabridged CDs • 7 CDs, 8 hours

Another page-turning thriller from the perennially entertaining Stuart Woods.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143144113
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/13/2009
Series: Will Lee Series , #6
Edition description: Unabridged, 6 CDs
Pages: 1
Product dimensions: 5.28(w) x 5.76(h) x 0.71(d)
Age Range: 18 - 14 Years

About the Author

Stuart Woods is the author of more than sixty novels. He is a native of Georgia and began his writing career in the advertising industry. Chiefs, his debut in 1981, won the Edgar Award. An avid sailor and pilot, Woods lives in Florida, Maine, and New Mexico.

Hometown:

Key West, Florida; Mt. Desert, Maine; New York, New York

Date of Birth:

January 9, 1938

Place of Birth:

Manchester, Georgia

Education:

B.A., University of Georgia, 1959

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Mounting Fears (Will Lee Series #7) 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
luvs2readBC More than 1 year ago
I felt like I was missing something at the end. I love all his books - but my favorites are the Stone Barrington novels. This one left you wondering where the rest of the book was. First one that I was disappointed in.
PrudentMan More than 1 year ago
In the first twenty pages I found eight editorial errors and/or factual errors. I was inclined to throw the book away but was intrigued by how many more I could find. Factual errors continued throughout the book along with contradictions.

I finished the book last night and am stil attempting to understand what the plot was. If you read this book and understand what he had in mind, please let me know. In my estimation, except for making a few bucks, it is a pointless novel and, except or some of the absurdity of the politicians and disingenuous Will Lee, spending the time reading this is a waste.

Scratch off another writer from my reading list. It seems, like Patterson, the more books they pump out the less value somewhat like out Treasury printing money.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anytime I see a book written by Stuart Woods, I purchase it without reading the jacket because I know that it will be a good read with interesting characters and great plot. But I must say, this recent book, Mounting Fears was unfortunately, a total disappointment...It was almost like he didn't write this story himself. It didn't feel like a Stuart Woods book and I actually was so glad when I finished it, I certainly wouldn't pass this book on to friends. Mr. Woods, you can do much better.

Next time, I'm reading the jacket. Pres. Will Lee is a character that Mr. Woods should retire.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As most other readers, I enjoy all of Stuart Woods' works. However, this one lacks his usual quick start and remains sluggish through out. Tying up the ends at the finish is quick and dirty giving little justice to the effort getting there. Hopefully this is just an exception and does not become the rule.
Technothriller_Fan More than 1 year ago
Woods¿ starts the story with a presidential nightmare¿a nuclear nightmare. Perhaps the nightmare has something to do with Kate¿s (his wife) rushed departure for Langley in the early morning hours after receiving an urgent phone call. Kate is the director of the CIA. Will Lee, President of the United States, is preparing for the Democratic convention where he expects to be selected as the parties candidate for a second term. A few hours later, Will Lee is giving his staff a pep talk when he is notified that the DCI and DDO are waiting for him in the Oval Office. Trouble in Pakistan¿nuclear trouble. Al-Qaeda has been naughty. The story is off to a very good beginning.

Will Lee has a second problem. His vice president is ill, cancer, and he must quickly find a replacement before the convention. A short list is prepared and quickly pared down to Martin Stanton, the governor of California. Ah, but, in our politically correct world where candidates are scrutinized under an electron microscope, can Stanton pass the ¿smell¿ test? There are two problems: his place of birth and women.

Where was Governor Stanton born? Everyone agrees it was near the Mexican-U.S. border, but on which side? Governor Stanton can¿t say for sure, for he was a little too young to remember. An old radio show began with, ¿Only the Shadow knows.¿ In the story, only the chauffer knows, because Stanton was born in the back seat of a Cadillac on the way from his parents home in Tijuana to a hospital in San Diego. A nefarious person coaches the chauffer on what to say. Will the opposition find out? Stuart Woods has hit a major nerve, one that can be described as ¿grabbed for the headlines.¿ For those who don¿t know, President-elect Obama¿s place of birth is in question.

Stanton¿s place of birth story line had great possibilities, however, Woods let it die at this point. Did Woods know about the pending Obama birth certificate issue when he wrote the book? Woods had to have completed MOUNTING FEARS in 2007, because we discussed the nuclear detonation at a book sighing in January 2008.

Governor Stanton is getting a divorce, and so far there is no other woman on the radar screens. But, is there a second woman? If so, how would she be discovered. This part of the story is well plotted with interesting characters.

Teddy Fay returns, and his adventures provide a good element of the story. Will Teddy always lurking in the shadows of Will Lee¿s world?

While Will Lee and his staff cope with Stanton¿s growing problems, al-Qaeda is busy in Pakistan. Two Pakistani missile site with nuclear warheads are attacked and things get interesting. Lee has to decide whether or not to intervene.

Woods is not a military thriller author, so take the nuclear stuff as fiction. Accurate information pertaining to nukes can be found in THE RINGS OF ALLAH and \ BEHOLD, AN ASHEN HORSE.

My problem with MOUNTING FEARS, and the reason for four stars, is that the ending appeared to be rushed, cut off in order to meet a deadline. All of the subplots were very good, and deserved to be better developed. Writing three books a year, even for a master like Stuart Woods, is a very daunting task. Writing three excellent books even more so.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lok
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book lacked luster and direction. The plot was so shallow you could easly guess what was around the next corner. Give us more but put some challenge in it.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a sad excuse of a Stuart Woods book. While most of his work is mindless, most nonetheless has been entertaining. He misses on the latter in this case. The lack of credible plot and an abundant shallowness that should carry a "do not dive in the shallow end" warning makes one wonder where his ideas come from! Unlike Woods most of the time, it's a book noire but opaquely so. The characters go beyond that in being transparent and not credible. Overall a very, very weak effort - or may be lack thereof!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Should have been much better, actually. I knew it was going to be pretty bad when in the first sentence of the book, you meet William Jefferson Lee IV. Woods may have been thinking about an actual president, because the name of his fictional president is William Henry Lee IV. Woods has written an entire book, Chiefs, where the two main characters were William Henry Lee, Jr. and William Henry Lee IV. How he missed this exscapes me. But it's become somewhat routine in his books on the Lees to have some mistakes. By the time Will Lee is running for president, if you do the math you realize that Woods has de-aged Billy and Patricia Lee, Will's parents, by at least ten years. This book, however, isn't really terrible. It just doesn't strike you as one thing or another. It's like an outline for a book that never materialized. Woods wrote my favorite book of all time, "Chiefs", and has written at least two really good follow-ups, "Grass Roots" and "Run Before The Wind." Maybe instead of chucking out several books a year, he should concentrate on one book at a time. Seems to have worked really well for Pat Conroy and Dan Brown.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed most of Stuart Woods' books. This one was alright. I didn't see any purpose in the Pakistan/Nuke storyline. It was just thrown in there. The other storylines were good, with a very quick ending. Overall, just OK. --K--
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All the usual characters, Will Lee, Katharine Rule Lee, Lance Cabot, Holly Barker, Teddy Fay ... and some new characters are introduced. The book introduces some interesting political scenarios and questions, I find it thought-provoking considering some real-life political issues at hand. Mr. Woods earlier books use to have some 'resolve' at the end but this one leaves you waiting for more; keeps the series alive. Overall, it is an easy read. If you like Stuart Woods book series, you will enjoy this. His writing style is easy and entertaining; yet thought-provoking for those that wish to go there..... A nice beach / pool read for the summer. Pour yourself a drink and enjoy the fun.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was okay, but I definitely enjoy his other series more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago