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Movement
     

Movement

5.0 1
by New Order
 

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Movement is the first hesitant step in the transition from Joy Division to New Order. Despite a relatively assured debut single ("Ceremony," which didn't even appear on the album), the first New Order album revealed a band apparently caught up in mourning for its former lead singer. (But of course, themes

Overview

Movement is the first hesitant step in the transition from Joy Division to New Order. Despite a relatively assured debut single ("Ceremony," which didn't even appear on the album), the first New Order album revealed a band apparently caught up in mourning for its former lead singer. (But of course, themes of loss and isolation were hardly novel for them.) Movement encompassed songs written just after the suicide of Ian Curtis, and it was recorded with alternating vocal spots to see whose would fit best -- although neither Peter Hook nor Bernard Sumner sounded worthy of the mantle. (At times, their hesitancy makes it sound as if they were recording guide vocals for a Joy Division LP, expecting Ian Curtis to come in later.) Despite the band's opaque lyrics, critics and fans were spotting references to Curtis all over the record, with despair and confusion reigning especially on "Senses" ("No reason ever was given") and "ICB" ("It's so far away, and it's closing in"). More so than on any Joy Division record, it also revealed a group unafraid to experiment relentlessly in the studio until it had emerged with something unique. Spurred on by producer Martin Hannett, despite his antagonistic relationship with the band (and perhaps, because of it), New Order produced a ghostly, brittle record, occasionally uptempo but never upbeat, with drum machines rattling and echoing over dark waves of synthesizers and Hook's basswork. A masterpiece in the career of any other post-punk band, Movement only paled in comparison to the band's later work.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/13/2008
Label:
London Import
UPC:
0685738195329
catalogNumber:
381953
Rank:
27664

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Movement 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am starting a new order, as it were, a movement, if you like, to re-appraise the greatness of this record. Ask anyone their favourite New Order album and no one, apart from me, will say this one. Indeed, many will recommend you avoid it. That's because it's a band in transition. But it is the album for those New Order fans who thought they didn't like Joy Division and those Joy Division fans who thought they didn't like New Order. While I admit, it does at times sound like the tracks that didn't make it onto 'Closer', particularly Truth, anyone with even a passing interest in Joy Division will know that lost 'Closer' recordings are still going to be ten times better than most other records you'll hear. All the usual suspects are here, Martin Hannett producing, the Peter Saville cover, even Ian Curtis lives on in the touching homage of Bernard Sumner's vocals. If you like tracks like Komakino, A Means to An End, These Days, 24 hours, then you HAVE to hear this album. Tracks like Senses and Dreams Never End are bona fide Sumner/Hook/Morris classics. I approached this album with trepidation, but the best albums are always the ones you take a chance on. Take a chance on this one, you won't be disappointed.