The Moviegoer

The Moviegoer

by Walker Percy
3.4 41

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The Moviegoer 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Moviegoer is a must-read for anyone interested in existentialism, or who also enjoys Camus or Hesse. However, like just about any existential story, you cannot sit and wait for a plot twist to keep you interested: the real enjoyment of such novels comes through the interpretation of the author's message. Each character in Percy's novels represents a subtle point he wants to make about society, and it is that interpretation or unlocking of his meaning that makes the whole story worthwhile.

Sometimes it requires multiple readings in order for it to be clear, but I can guarantee that if you really pay attention to this book and others by Percy and those mentioned above, you will not look at people or society exactly the same way again (Which is really the point, as opposed to just a thrilling plot or romantic affair). So if you want to learn something, both about yourself and the community you fit into, this is an excellent book to start out with.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was not familiar with Walker Percys work or "The Moviegoer" and read this as a nook recommendation. Although written over fifty years ago, the theme of lost values and searching for a place is maybe even more relevant today. A book worth reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing. It's humorous and philosophical. Kate is the perfect Dostoevsky female.
TheMonkeyMan More than 1 year ago
One horrible book. Really, I tried to read it twice because the first time through told me nothing about it. It's a bunch of egotistical rambling about a person who is unhappy with his life. There is nothing engaging about this book whatsoever. Would not recommend despite its awards.
camcgee97 More than 1 year ago
Ought to be required reading, and not just because it's a shining example of the so- called "existential" novel. "The Moviegoer" has all of the southern style you would expect form a Louisiana native, but what really makes it shine is Percy's intimacy with the modern American soul. Percy's novels, of which "The Moviegoer" was the first, peer into the psyche much like Dr. Thomas More's Ontological Lapsometer, which Percy wrote about in "Love in The Ruins." This nearly unparalleled depth of understanding of the human condition matched with a unique sense of humor and the novelists' ability to put a face on difficult ideas is what makes Percy's work worth reading, and all these things are present in abundance in "The Moviegoer."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I suspect that many Walker Percy fans ( I am one of them) are somewhat outside of the mainstream of the average novel reader. So if you are new to Percy's writing it might be a good idea to checkout a few book reviews before you begin. For me there is no one like Percy. This is my second go around with "The Moviegoer," but with several of his other works it has been three re-reads! The plot and characters he has created are quite unique. The story is always intriguing and provides lots to think about. That is not to say that there aren't comic moments along the way. All in all, the book was a great pleasure for me to read (again). I hope the same will be true for you if you decide to look into "The Moviegoer."
DanMorgan More than 1 year ago
Faulkner's influence upon Walker Percy is easily seen in The Moviegoer. Conciously, or not, Percy has retold the tale of self-abnegation for love, only it leads to a salvation of sorts - undoubtedly due to Percy's deep and abiding Catholic sensibilities. A young man adrift finds love in an unlikely place, earns a bit of social stigma and rebuke, only in the Percy telling, the two seem to work out and all is forgiven. Even most of the scenery is the same, New Orleans, Chicago, and the Gulf Coast. There is a suffocating, languid sense of time in the story as well. But it works superbly in showing the forces which the protagonist must over come. The slow pace of life in New Orleans, coupled with the city's entire social and economic scenes tied so inimately to Mardi Gras/Krewe traditions leads to a certain inertia. To escape, at least mentally, Binx must spend most evenings at the theater, leading a voyeuristic and escapist life in his head. It is only when he breaks out of the cycle and routine, does his life make some progress, although with great risk to relations with his family.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found myself putting this book down over and over and forgetting to pick it back up again for weeks at a time. I did finally complete the novel and felt that it was a worthy expedition, however flawed and dry it was at times.
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The Moviegoer, Walker Percy’s first novel, is, truly, a tragicomic tour de force. For, herein, Percy presents an interesting cast of characters, a truly moving, and often terribly amusing, plot and, most importantly, a philosophical exploration of one man’s search for meaning in a meaningless world. Percy’s masterpiece is a must-read for those who are interested in existential, or even absurdist, philosophy; it presents existential lessons in an entirely new and entertaining light.
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