Moxyland

Moxyland

by Lauren Beukes
4.0 15

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Moxyland 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
GordonF More than 1 year ago
This is the new face of Cybperunk SF, clipping along without apologies, or stopping to make sure you're still on the bus. The four first-person narratives is a little disorienting at first, but once you get into the rhythm of the four voices if flows well. Like any good hard future some characters get what's coming, and some get caught under the wheels. Definitely worth reading.
EvinB More than 1 year ago
I just finished this title last night and was afraid I wouldn't be able to post about it. Luckily for me, and all of you it releases in just two short weeks. Well unluckily for all of you as you will have to wait yo read it. Moxyland is an intense story of revolt that follows four characters who each narrate the tale in turn. The motley cast is introduced one at a time, switching chapter by chapter as their part unfolds. Ms. Beukes does an amazing job of distinguishing each by changing tone and style to fit the current lead. Moxyland is set in a future version of Cape Town, South Africa. Here your cell service pretty much proves your value. The worst thing the police can do to you is disconnect your SIM id making you pretty much cease to exist. If you go disconnect you're unable to get a cab, buy food, even get into your home. It would make life very difficult. This basically sets up the class struggle that is the central theme of Moxyland. The four key players, in order they are introduced are: Kendra, who is a photographer turned brand ambassador. She promos Ghost, a popular energy drink, with a nanobot infused tattoo on her left forearm. Toby, a socialite turned streamcaster. Constantly recording his life though his way too cool "Babystrange" coat. Which is made from an electronic cloth that will show off the images. Tendeka, our leading revolutionary who ties the revolt to many of the other characters. His idealism pushes him to always try to do a bigger shock to really wake up the masses. And lastly Lerato, a technical wiz who is more than anything motivated by power. Though that doesn't stop her from doing a favor or two for Toby seemingly just for the thrill of it. I really enjoyed this story because everything is never exactly as it seems to be. There are times when you think that you have a solid handle of who's doing what and Bam! Their motives or objectives are completely different. The characters each just pop off the page and despite jumping away from one every chapter or even every few pages at some points, you still find yourself attached to these people. Their lives seem very real, and most importantly the reality it's set in, the not so far off future... Well it doesn't seem so far off. There are details in this book that really set in because you can see that image of the future. It may be far enough away from reality to be fiction today, but the tone it sets really ends up being a bit horrifying. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who loves hard Sci Fi stuff. It pushes the bounds of current science, but not so far to be unrealistic. The stuff in here is just a little out of our grasp, but most of it could be here in five or ten years. Bottom line: Read this book. It's intense from start to finish and I don't think there is anyone out there who couldn't enjoy it... Unless you hate being entertained. Then well... I'm sorry.
stickerooniDM 6 months ago
I've really enjoyed so many of the books I've read in the past few years, but few authors stand out for absolute originality as much Lauren Beukes. In Moxyland, Beukes gives the reader a very believable future where technology is so integrated that it's impossible to imagine someone without their cellphone or their nanotech drug of choice. Corporations continue to grow and look for new, improved ways of hanging on to clients and have more pull and power than does the political system. Here, individuals become corporations themselves, and social media is more 'real' (certainly more safe) than the outside world. Kendra is an art school drop-out and sellout. She's become a walking billboard for a soft drink company - their logo shines through her skin and she's constantly craving the drink. Toby is a video blogger who likes to think of himself as little more of a rebel than he probably is. Lerator is an AIDS-baby who works for a major corporation as one of their best programmers, but she gets a high from hacking. And there is Tendeka, the rebel who pulls together the others and tries to cut short the strings of the corporations to the everyday people. The story is told from all four points of view, alternating by chapter. Of the Lauren Beukes books that I've read, this has so far been my least favorite. There are many similarities with Zoo Story - mostly with the setting and the technology running amok ideas - perhaps this is becoming her signature, but because of the alternating points of view, the story becomes much more fractured. I never quite bond with any of the characters because just when I felt I was about to understand them and see their side of things, I'd be switched to someone else's view. Because Beukes is so original, I spent a fair amount of time just grasping on to new concepts and trying to understand the world and the technology. Add this to the jumping points of view and I really struggled to get to know the people who mattered in the story. Because for all her concepts, Beukes still writes about people and human behavior. And without my connection to them, the story didn't have the impact that it should. I want to read this again. Knowing now how the story is presented, and now more familiar with the setting, I think I'd be ready to pick up more on the characters' story. But for a one-time reading, this just doesn't quite work. Looking for a good book? Lauren Beukes reaches out into some new territory once again, with Moxyland, but the fractured story-telling style keeps the reader from becoming fully vested. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I tried reading this and was encouraged when I saw parallels with Snow Crash, which I love. Let's examine this. Snow Crash tells a story with some interesting future jargon used to enhance the flow and speculate on the future development of language ("You can't rez what YT says.") Moxy Land reads like the transcript of conversations between various teenagers many years from now. It's constant, it's overwhelming, and frankly, it's irritating. I don't think I can even finish it. Shame.
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Ashiri More than 1 year ago
The book started out a little bit strange and hard to understand but as I read on, I got the hang of it. It was an awesome read. The writer captured my attention from start to finish!!!