Mozart: Le Nozze Di Figaro

Mozart: Le Nozze Di Figaro

by Georg Solti
5.0 4

CD(Complete)

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Product Details

Release Date: 03/12/1984
Label: Decca
UPC: 0028941015020
catalogNumber: 410150

Tracks

  1. Le nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro), opera, K. 492  - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart  - Jane Berbié  - Kiri Te Kanawa  - Yvonne Kenny  - Philip Langridge  - Decca N. Lesieur  -  London Opera Chorus  -  London Philharmonic Orchestra  - Kurt Moll  - Lucia Popp  - Samuel Ramey  - Lynda Russell  - Georg Solti  - Giorgio Tadeo  - Jeffrey Tate  - Robert Tear  - Frederica Von Stade  - Henning Weber  -  Thomas Allen  - Anne Mason

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Mozart: Le Nozze Di Figaro 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first digital recording of "Le Nozze" is one of the best. Solti brings a swift yet controlling hand to the music and never lets the energy lag. There is no better Susanna than the late Lucia Popp. Her tone is brilliant and playful, while still being able to convey the pathos of "Deh, vieni." Te Kanawa is recorded very, very well and is in wonderful voice. Samuel Ramey, at the time was early in his career and hadn't yet begun to swallow his tone, sings with aplomb and humor. Sir Thomas Allen is a richly voiced, smooth and noble Almaviva overflowing with jealousy and passion in the Act II finale. The other singers acquit themselves of their roles nicely, particularly a youthful Frederica von Stade as Cherubino. All the usually cut numbers are present here, such as the arias for Marcellina and Basilio. Worth every penny of the price, but highlights are available as well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is no questioning the unique brilliance of this music. If Jommelli's Il Vologeso gives us perfection, Mozart's opera offers supercharged perfection. The remarkable kinetic energy of the overture carries over to quick repartee among the characters. The problem is that I cannot identify with the society pictured here. Taken at face value, the Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni should be praised for condemning adultery. But these operas have not been taken at face value. There is some question whether they were meant to be. In Don Giovanni the wretched Don is supposed to be some kind of hero. In the Marriage of Figaro another lecherous nobleman, Almaviva, is outwitted. The problem is that he needs to be guillotined. Granted that these operas testify to a dying feudalism, the means proposed to overthrow these sexual villains are too mild.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is no questioning the unique brilliance of this music. If Jommelli's Il Vologeso gives us perfection, Mozart's opera offers supercharged perfection. The remarkable acrobatic energy of the overture carries over to the quick repartee among the characters. The problem is that I cannot identify with the society pictured here to any extent whatever. Taken at face value, the Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni should be praised for condemning adultery. But these operas have not been taken at face value and there is some doubt whether they are intended to be. The wretched Don Giovanni is supposed to be some kind of hero. In The Marriage of Figaro another lecherous nobleman, Almaviva, is outwitted. He needs to be guillotined instead. Granted that these operas testify to dying feudalism, the means proposed to overthrow the corrupt nobles is either powder puff in Figaro or a formulaic judgment that everybody is supposed to laugh at in Giovanni. Take the character Cherubino-- if you can stand him. Instead of praising this teenage idiot's good looks, I would rather punch him in the nose. Love is just too much for this human rabbit to understand. Give him a leaf of lettuce. In other words, these operas are built on the same foppish foundation which they are supposedly seeking to overthrow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago