Mr. Darcy's Daughters

Mr. Darcy's Daughters

by Elizabeth Aston, Jane Pride Austen
3.5 73

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Overview

Mr. Darcy's Daughters by Elizabeth Aston, Jane Pride Austen

Picking up twenty years after Pride and Prejudice left off, Mr. Darcy's Daughters begins in the year 1818. Elizabeth and Darcy have gone to Constantinople, giving us an opportunity to get to know their five daughters, who have left the sheltered surroundings of Pemberley for a few months in London. While the eldest, Letitia, frets and the youngest, Alethea, practices her music, twins Georgina and Belle flirt and frolic their way through parties and balls and Camilla — levelheaded and independent — discovers what joys and sorrows the city has to offer an intelligent young woman. Readers will delight in the return of such beloved Austen creations as Elizabeth's old nemesis Caroline Bingley (now Lady Warren), the ever-reliable Gardiners and wayward Aunt Lydia.
Charming, beautifully written and full of societal intrigue and romantic high jinks, Mr. Darcy's Daughters is a tale that would please Austen herself.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780743243971
Publisher: Touchstone
Publication date: 04/08/2003
Edition description: Original
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 830,942
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Elizabeth Aston is a passionate Jane Austen fan who studied with Austen biographer Lord David Cecil at Oxford. The author of several novels, including Mr. Darcy's Daughters, she lives in England and Italy.

Visit www.elizabeth-aston.com for more information.

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Mr. Darcy's Daughters 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 73 reviews.
JoannaTX More than 1 year ago
Originality? Nonexistant. Welcome to a practically plagiarized version of Pride and Prejudice taking place twenty years later. Harsh - I know, but true. There is almost a 100 percent lack of originality that I find alarming. Here, let me show you. There are 5 Bennet daughters...sound familiar? One of them is serious and proper, two are obscenely flirtatious, one is witty and charming, and another is a music devotee. One of them even elopes. Frankly, there is no concept of originality. Also, though Pride & Prejudice is rather light-hearted, we learn the results of a nonsensical mother and a "laisse-faire" practicing father. But Lizzy and Darcy are not the types to have neglected their children's education and upbringing. Also, Darcy's cousin Fitzwilliam seems the POLAR OPPOSITE of the original character. What was the author thinking?? I haven't read any of her other novels, (why bother?) so I can't give an informed review on them. But I certainly have no good things to say about this one. I don't expect the Jane Austin magic in a modern writer, but I DO expect the "spirit" in attempted sequels. If you want some good modern adaptations of JA novels, I recommend reading Debra White Smith!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was enjoyable if you just wanted another authors opinion of how pride and prejudice continues. However, Aston took considerable liberties with her characters. She changed the personalities of beloved characters like Col. Fitzwilliam and the Gardiners. All five of the Darcy's daughters shows extreme similarities to characters in P&P. It is well written and entertaining, but it is not at all true to how Jane Austen would have written it. However, if you want Jane Austen style writing, read one of her own books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book was OK, not great. If you took Pride and Prejudice and plopped it over the book, you have your story. Many of the characters were not developed fully -- why talk about Lettie's boyfriend Busby and sort of have him at one of the balls, but don't have him approach Lettie--why was he even introduced physically. Also, Aunt Lydia was just touched upon and not fully developed. She was important to the twins, but she didn't get enough time in the book. It was a quick read, but I thought it would be better. I was disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Absolutely AWFUL!!! The author has taken every hated character from Pride and Prejudice and turned them into the Darcy¿s children. The story line was poor, the daughters were UNBEARABLE, and side characters were a misery! I am quite sure that Jane Austen is still turning in her grave from this travesty. If the author was going to ¿borrow¿ another author¿s story, I would think that every attempt to keep within the theme and message of the original story would be made. This is not the case. Perhaps the writer of this steaming pile of wasted words should attempt to ruin only her own stories in the future.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was given to me as a gift by someone who knows of my love for novels by Jane Austen. I have read a few sequels before and at times have been utterly disappointed. In this case, I was not. While it was predictable in the matches and attitudes of each of the daughters, it was still an enjoyable read. The language was not exactly the right time period, but it was close enough and was easy to understand. I was slightly disappointed that Darcy and Elizabeth did not make an appearance, but perhaps it was better that way. Many authors writing sequels to Pride and Prejudice don't get Darcy and Elizabeth right and it is better to leave them out all together if it isn't going to be right. The plot was pleasing and the characters were engaging. Elizabeth Aston did an admirable job with this novel and I am looking forward to reading the next novel in the series. If you must read a sequel to Pride and Prejudice, let it be this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you enjoy tales of Regency England, I recommend this book. Not really a sequel to Pride and Prejudice , it is its own novel that uses Austen's characters. Aston is extremely well researched and her depiction of the time period is accurate, although her plot was most certainly written for a modern audience. While some of the more scandalous plot lines were certainly NOT out of place for the time period (ie, there really were homosexuals in the early 19th century), they most definitely would never have been written about by a regency author. Luckily, Elizabeth and Darcy do not appear in the novel at all, so we are not forced into a comparison with Austen herself. Mr. Darcy's Daughters is a good, fun, quick read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mr. Darcy's Daughters was overall a good read. However, Elizabeth Aston did not continue Austen's style of writing, and the characters she created were not original at all. The five Darcy daughters were exactly like the five Bennet sisters. Camilla resembles Lizzy, Letty is like Jane, Alethea is like Mary, and Georgiana and Belle are like Kitty and Lydia. Wytton was just like Darcy, and Layard similar to Bingley. In addition, the storyline and events in the book were very similar to those of Pride and Prejudice. I also seriously doubt that Darcy would ever let his children act this way anywhere; the girls were scandalous. Despite the lack of creativity, the story itself was enjoyable and kept me reading. If you can overlook the similarities between the story and P&P, it is a book worth reading. I would recommend it to anyone as a good Pride and Prejudice sequel, but not the most original one.
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PassionateAustenite More than 1 year ago
LOVE all the books in this series. Amazing author. Great story lines. Truly amazing characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book!(and the entire series!), which I have read at least twice in the short time I have owned them! "Mr. Darcy's Daughters" gives the reader a glimpse into the liveliness and youthfulness of Fitzwilliam and Elizabeth Darcy's girls, as this author has invisioned them, each endearing in their own way, filled with liveliness, gaiety, and even intrigue. They have their own ups and downs just like any young person today would have...many new characters are introduced in this first book, and some of the characters are continued on in the following five books in the series. If you like the continuance of reading about the family of Darcy and Elizabeth, you will enjoy the light reading of these fictitious novels by Elizabeth Aston. Delightful reads!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IrretrievablyBroken More than 1 year ago
There is something of the grave robber in a writer who pens a sequel to a dead author's story. I am talking about Elizabeth Aston who wrote "Mr. Darcy's Daughters: A Novel," intended as a sequel to Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." I noted with interest that Elizabeth calls herself "Aston" while Jane, of course, was an "Austen." Cleverly chosen penname, I assume? Still, remembering Colton's maxim that "imitation is the sincerest form of flattery," and keeping on hand a good dose of Coleridge's "suspension of disbelief," I thought Aston pulled it off quite well. In "Mr. Darcy's Daughters," the girls are perfectly modeled on the original Bennett girls of "Pride and Prejudice." Our modern Aston pretty much matches the 19th Century voice with a bit more modernity and some juicy scandal thrown into the plot. I was fine with both. While the Darcy twins at times were exasperating to the point where you want to smack them, after all is revealed and hurt feelings have been soothed, they were not that much wilder than their parents' generation. Aston is not Austen, but she doesn't try to be. Unlike Austen, Aston is not a social critic or a writer who explores manners and mores of her time. She describes her creation as "full of societal intrigue and romantic high jinks," in other words an entertaining romance, and this she delivers. Elizabeth Aston is a skilled writer who gives us an entertaining good read. Graham Greene, whom I would call a great writer of an important body of literature, did not want his works labeled as such. He simply called them entertainments. I think what's good enough for Greene is good enough for Aston.
Kimp More than 1 year ago
I bought this book this past summer, and I just now got around to reading it. Nice plot that doesn't mess with Austen's original story. Not quite as good as some other Austen continuations but worth a read.
TRUEJaneFan More than 1 year ago
This book is a joke. It is almost an exact replica of P & P. These are supposedly the daughters of Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet. NOT IN A MILLION YEARS, would their daughters conduct themselves in the manner of these girls. Not only this...the story is incredibly unoriginal. The eldest (just like Jane) is the prettiest and most composed. She ruins this, though, by making her a complete paranoid worrywart, tending toward religious fanaticism. The second (Elizabeth) is the more sensible, realistic, and clever. One of the younger girls is a shadow of Mary. Only absorbed in music as opposed to books. The other two are mirror images of Kitty and Lydia. Wild, unabashed, with little care for society's rules, their parents respectability, their Aunt's authority or the reprecussions of their behavior. Right down to a supposed elopement to Gretna Green....this book was almost like reading Pride and Prejudice over again, except not nearly as well written. If I save ONE Jane Austen fan the time and money that will be wasted on this book, I will be happy.