Mr. Darcy's Dream: A Novel

Mr. Darcy's Dream: A Novel

by Elizabeth Aston
3.7 17

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Overview

Mr. Darcy's Dream: A Novel by Elizabeth Aston

From the author of Mr. Darcy's Daughters, the delightful escapades of the Darcy family continue with an enchanting story set at Pride and Prejudice's Pemberley.

When Phoebe, a young niece of Pride and Prejudice's Mr. Darcy, is shattered by an unhappy romance, she retreats to Pemberley and is joined by kind-hearted Louisa Bingley, unmarried after three London seasons. Once the young ladies are situated in the house, several handsome strangers also arrive -- all hopeful of winning the girls' hearts. As preparations for the ball which Mr. and Mrs. Darcy are to give at Pemberley gain momentum, mischief and love triangles abound, making life as difficult as possible for anyone connected with the Darcy family.

Populated with authentic characters firmly rooted in Jane Austen's mores and stylistic traditions, Mr. Darcy's Dream has an unforgettable combination of romance, societal scandals, friendship, family, and marriage.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416547266
Publisher: Touchstone
Publication date: 02/03/2009
Edition description: Original
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 1,283,420
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Elizabeth Aston is a passionate Jane Austen fan who studied with Austen biographer Lord David Cecil at Oxford. The author of several novels, including Mr. Darcy's Daughters, she lives in England and Italy.

Visit www.elizabeth-aston.com for more information.

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Mr. Darcy's Dream 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Aston adds another enjoyable, light-hearted Regency read to her "Darcy" series--and this one includes the man himself, albeit breifly! It seems to start in an odd place, but the interview with the author at the end explains Aston's reasoning, and overall it is very enjoyable. I liked how in this particular book, Aston showcases more of the behind-the-scenes work done by the servants in that particular time period; it gives an interesting perspective and added depth to a pretty simple plot.
C2Quips More than 1 year ago
Having recently re-read Austen's Pride & Prejudice, as well as Georgette Heyer's regency novels, this book, by comparison, is extremely shallow. I find a lack of depth of character and writing style the saddest. I had high expectations, but they went unfulfilled. This author should read and study Heyer, the master of the genre. Then go back and do a re-write.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As always, Elizabeth Aston delivers. However, I waited for this book for a really long time and I was just a little bit disappointed about how the series as a whole ended. I was glad that Darcy's was slightly more than just a presence in this book, but I wanted a little extra. I choose not to think of this book as the last even though it is. It just makes it go down a little easier. Other than that, it is still a worthy read.
Laurel_Ann More than 1 year ago
Twenty-year old Phoebe Hawkins is handsome, well-born, and endowed with a fortune of fifty thousand pounds to the lucky man to win her affections. Unfortunately, her choice Mr. Anthony Stanhope has a bit of a bad rep prompting her father to reject his offer of marriage. Undaunted, Phoebe is certain that Stanhope is no rake until she witnesses his assignation with a notorious woman. Heartbroken and dejected, her clever ma'ma Lady Georgiana averts London gossip by devising a plan to send her to the country to her uncle Darcy's estate in Derbyshire until it blows over. Joining her is her amiable cousin Louisa Bingley whose failure to engage after three London seasons is a bit of flop. Their temperaments could not be more opposite. Quick to judge, Phoebe's free spirit challenges social stricture, while easygoing Louisa is as accepting of fate as her mother Jane Bingley seeing little fault in anything. Both feel the pressure to fulfill their family obligations with brilliant marriages yet neither have a clue as to why they have not succeeded. Together they hope for a respite at Pemberley free from the pressures of thinking about men, while focusing instead on planning a summer ball while the Darcy's are abroad. The young ladies arrive at Pemberley to see great improvements underway with the construction of a grand new glasshouse supervised by Mr. Darcy's estate manager Hugh Drummond, all part of Mr. Darcy's dream of modernizing Pemberley, (thus the book title). When Mr. Stanhope arrives in the neighborhood on the pretext of visiting his married sister, Phoebe is resigned not to see him averting his persistent attempts until she must face the music. Add to this mix the return of devilish George Warren and you have your sinister element. When Mr. Darcy finally arrives at Pemberley to attend the ball, the story swiftly concludes as all the romantic misunderstanding and machinations have been resolved, but not to everyone's satisfaction. Underneath this diverting historical romance, Aston has supplied us with perceptive commentary on early 19th-century life in upper class England where women's worlds were governed by men and social convention. Throughout the novel there is a thin thread of cynicism about marriage illustrated by Mr. Stanhope's unhappily married sister Kitty, "one day you'll realize you need an heir, and will propose to the nearest available girl, who will proceed to make your life misery.", and the fear of infidelity by Phoebe after witnessing the affects on her parent's relationship after their own affairs. These honest themes can be a bit leveling, but move this novel away from being escapist fluff. To lighten it up, Aston has supplied the requisite ensemble of secondary characters to add interest, but little humor: a peevish Frog governess, fussy and gossipy maids, an officious great aunt, a toady Minister, and a bit of espionage to keep the plot churning and our attention engaged. Overall, I found the tone of Mr. Darcy's Dream a bit dark and overshadowed with angst. When reading a sequel to the light, bright and sparkling Pride and Prejudice it is difficult not to compare the two, but in all fairness to Ms. Aston this novel is so far removed in time and characters to the original that it is an entirely new entity. On its own merit I enjoyed it thoroughly and recommend it highly. As a continuation of a 'Mr. Darcy does something novel', well, that it debatable. Laurel Ann, Austenprose
BookObssessedLorii More than 1 year ago
I Loved This Book! This is the latest in the series of sequals to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice written by Elizabeth Aston. I highly recomend the entire seies in the order that they were written. Although I have read other sequals, this series is my favorite! If you enjoy historical mysteries as well, you will enjoy the series by Carrie Bebris which starts up right after the classic pride and prejudice leaves off.
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