Mr. Midshipman Easy

Mr. Midshipman Easy

by Frederick Marryat
3.5 9

NOOK BookDigitized from 1836 volume (eBook - Digitized from 1836 volume)

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Overview

Mr. Midshipman Easy by Frederick Marryat

As the 18th century gives way to the 19th, an eccentric young man joins Britain's navy to see the world and to practice his own odd brand of philosophy. But fighting sea battles, beating off brigands in foreign lands and earning respect from his superiors convince him that his philosophy is not as sound as he once thought. He returns from sea a man to find love and to inherit his father's wealth.

"Written nearly two centuries ago, this exciting tale has a chuckle on nearly every page." (B-O-T Editorial Review Board)

Product Details

BN ID: 2940020517523
Publisher: London, Saunders and Otby
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 278 KB

About the Author

Captain Frederick Marryat (10 July 1792 - 9 August 1848) was a British Royal Navy officer, a novelist, and an acquaintance of Charles Dickens. He is noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story, particularly for his semi-autobiographical novel Mr Midshipman Easy (1836), for his children's novel The Children of the New Forest (1847), and for a widely used system of maritime flag signalling, known as Marryat's Code.

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Mr. Midshipman Easy 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE this book, having read it in hard copy. But this edition is a formatting MESS! Odd random characters, hit or miss sizing... A disaster. Try a paid Nook edition! Had to give only one star because of this edition.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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zeendil More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed this book! At times, the satire approached being Swiftian. The writer was very skilled at demonstrating the silliness that motivates folk who are so serious about everything. "Our hero," as Marryat refers to him, is a scamp and why he hasn't been killed by angry officers, governors, fathers of sweet young things, and/or pirates is a mystery. Truly, Mr. Midshipman Easy lives a charmed life. After a time, I was wondering "What will he do next?" I am a great fan of sea=faring yarns and have read most of the popular books in the genre. The sea faring here is just a vehicle. This is a very old book that is new in its pacing. A light and quick read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Reading this book is hardly neccessary. Simply flip through the pages to the illustrations where all of the text truly comes to life. Mr. Polseno rocks my world.