My Dearest Friend: Letters of Abigail and John Adams

My Dearest Friend: Letters of Abigail and John Adams

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Overview

My Dearest Friend: Letters of Abigail and John Adams by Abigail Adams, John Adams

In 1762, John Adams penned a flirtatious note to "Miss Adorable," the 17-year-old Abigail Smith. In 1801, Abigail wrote to wish her husband a safe journey as he headed home to Quincy after serving as president of the nation he helped create. The letters that span these nearly forty years form the most significant correspondence -- and reveal one of the most intriguing and inspiring partnerships -- in American history.

As a pivotal player in the American Revolution and the early republic, John had a front-row seat at critical moments in the creation of the United States, from the drafting of the Declaration of Independence to negotiating peace with Great Britain to serving as the first vice president and second president under the U.S. Constitution. Separated more often than they were together during this founding era, John and Abigail shared their lives through letters that each addressed to "My Dearest Friend," debating ideas and commenting on current events while attending to the concerns of raising their children (including a future president).

Full of keen observations and articulate commentary on world events, these letters are also remarkably intimate. This new collection -- including some letters never before published -- invites readers to experience the founding of a nation and the partnership of two strong individuals, in their own words. This is history at its most authentic and most engaging.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780674026063
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publication date: 10/15/2007
Pages: 528
Product dimensions: 6.60(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.50(d)

About the Author

Margaret A. Hogan is an independent scholar and former editor of the Adams Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

C. James Taylor is former Editor in Chief of the Adams Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

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My Dearest Friend: Letters of Abigail and John Adams 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
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TRPChicago More than 1 year ago
You are in the corridor of Independence Hall in Philadelphia and in a little sitting room in Braintree in the mid 1770's, looking over the shoulders of a young man and his often-left-behind wife as they tell each other the news. You are with these two as they discuss their children, their neighbors, health care, politics and what will become the founding document of America. In the letter John writes to Abigail after the vote on "Independency" is taken, his first six paragraphs respond to her news in an earlier letter. Only in the last two short paragraphs does this pivotal figure of history tell her that "the greatest Question was decided, which ever was debated in America..." And his next letter, the same day, describes how history will celebrate the Fourth of July many years hence. This is history, biography and romance, original documents of a couple the likes of whom we have not seen since.
PixieRM More than 1 year ago
We chose this selection for our book club because we are going to Boston and will have a private tour of the Adams library. The letters are slow-going for the first 50 pages because of the archaic spellings and mechanics. Those pages help the reader get into the flow of Abigail's and John's style, their relationship, and the issues they discuss. After toughing it out, the reader gets hooked. It is rewarding to read their letters as primary resources, seeing their times together and separated reflecting history through their close relationship. A slough at first; this has proved engrossing. Time and energy well-spent. Very interesting to see how health, finances, and all that is the dailiness of life concerned them as it concerns us.
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