My Own Country: A Doctor's Story of a Town and Its People in the Age of AIDS

My Own Country: A Doctor's Story of a Town and Its People in the Age of AIDS

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Overview

My Own Country: A Doctor's Story of a Town and Its People in the Age of AIDS by Abraham Verghese, A. Verghese, Abraham Vergehese

By the bestselling author of Cutting for Stone, a story of medicine in the American heartland, and confronting one's deepest prejudices and fears.

Nestled in the Smoky Mountains of eastern Tennessee, the town of Johnson City had always seemed exempt from the anxieties of modern American life. But when the local hospital treated its first AIDS patient, a crisis that had once seemed an “urban problem” had arrived in the town to stay.
   
Working in Johnson City was Abraham Verghese, a young Indian doctor specializing in infectious diseases. Dr. Verghese became by necessity the local AIDS expert, soon besieged by a shocking number of male and female patients whose stories came to occupy his mind, and even take over his life. Verghese brought a singular perspective to Johnson City: as a doctor unique in his abilities; as an outsider who could talk to people suspicious of local practitioners; above all, as a writer of grace and compassion who saw that what was happening in this conservative community was both a medical and a spiritual emergency.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780679752929
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/12/1995
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 193,257
Product dimensions: 5.19(w) x 7.99(h) x 0.99(d)

About the Author

Abraham Verghese is Professor and Senior Associate Chair for the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He was the founding director of the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, where he is now an adjunct professor. He is the author of My Own Country, a 1994 NBCC Finalist and a Time Best Book of the Year, and The Tennis Partner, a New York Times Notable Book. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he has published essays and short stories that have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, Esquire, Granta, The Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. He lives in Palo Alto, California.

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My Own Country 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was an assigned reading for my Bio-Ethics class at UAB. Dr. Verguese's perspective of life and environment was the true theme of this writing. Surely I learned of AIDS,HIV,homesexuality and their commonalities, however, I was more impressed with what I read between the lines. Dr. Abraham Verguese, what a great asset to, not just medicine,but humanity.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The stories in this book are all real sad life stores. Each patient encounter still left a vivid image and big scar in my heart. They reminded me of the deficiency of our health care system and that there is so much more we 'especially the health care professionals' can, should and must do to care for those are tormented by ailments. On the one hand, it saddened me to realize how ignorance, prejudice and selfishness of mankind can tear us apart but on the other hand it gave me hope to know that there is always someone who is heroic and selfless willing to sacrifice.
ismene7 More than 1 year ago
This particular book caught my eye because I was looking for a real compelling story by someone other than a celebrity. Here is a doctor who lives in the smalltown south when the AIDS crisis hits there. He is foreign and somewhat ambitious, but this health problem catches at his very heart along with the individuals who come to his clinic with the illness. He grows and changes through his contact with the many AIDS victimes, their families, his own family, and the wider world. Now AIDS has a different feel to it, but then it was a hard landscape to travel in.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a pre-med undergraduate, I took an AIDS seminar last year. This book was one of our assigned readings. I should preface this review by saying that I am Indian, which does impact the way I look at this book... mainly because as much as it is about the story of AIDS in rural TN, it is also about a foreign doctor reacting to this situation, as the author points out throughout the text. The book is very poignant and touching. It really makes the reader contemplate how the negative connotations of AIDS (being associated with gays in its beginning stages, a sexually transmitted disease, and so on) affect the way our society has chosen to deal with it. Furthermore, it is a tale of courage not often recognized in medicine. Dr. Veghese and others of his time had no clue what AIDS was about, it's methods of transmission, possible cures... but they chose to put their own lives and that of their families at risk to help these patients. It is an honest account that is heartwarming. Read it!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
'My Own Country' was not a book that I particularly wanted to like. As a long-time resident of Johnson City, TN (the location of most of the action in the book), I decided to read it convinced that our town and the people in it would be portrayed as backwards, prejudiced hicks. But Dr. Verghese' haunting story won me over. I realized there was much about my community that I heretofore hadn't known existed. Beyond that, I realized that what had happened in my community, was merely a reflection of what had occurred in thousands of other communities nationwide. 'My Own Country' triumphs because it takes the monumental subject of 'AIDS' and makes it personal. It is a beautifully-crafted, and moving story that will stay with you long after the last word is read. I wholeheartedly recommend it.
Maertel More than 1 year ago
Incredible story of the first AIDS doctor in rural eastern Tennessee. What a generous soul! I only hope that, in his later years, he developed Dr. Albert Schweitzer's feelings toward animals. Dr. Verghese's hamster episodes were unfunny, out-of-place, and cruelly depressing.
ltaylor9 More than 1 year ago
A powerful look at the pandemic.
willowtreeCG More than 1 year ago
It is not an intense captivating book. Yet it causes you to want to keep on reading. He has a lovely way of bringing out the importance of all the small everyday details in people's lives and how they are connected to the way these people react to big things in their lives that they have to deal with. This book should be mandetory to all students intending to work with people.
Anonymous 11 months ago
Too long Cutting for Stone is good
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