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My Wild Sister and Me
     

My Wild Sister and Me

by Iris Wewer
 

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Having a wild big sister—who can be a giraffe one day, a giant bear the next, and a racing rabbit the day after that—is just about the very best thing that can happen to little brother.  Iris Wewer's rollicking illustrations perfectly match this playful story of imagination and adventure!  Wewer's take on sibling relationships was published

Overview

Having a wild big sister—who can be a giraffe one day, a giant bear the next, and a racing rabbit the day after that—is just about the very best thing that can happen to little brother.  Iris Wewer's rollicking illustrations perfectly match this playful story of imagination and adventure!  Wewer's take on sibling relationships was published with great reviews and interest in hardcover.  NorthSouth is pleased to offer this popular title now in paperback.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
With great sensitivity and sweetness, German writer Wewer probes the never-quite-settled nature of sibling relationships. The younger one (who, with messy hair and a striped playsuit could be a little brother or sister) compares their changing moods to animals, and Wewer pictures them as animals, or dressed up as animals. "Some days, my older sister is a giraffe. She struts around and ignores me." (Here, Wewer pictures the older sister's head atop a leggy, spotted body; the younger sibling shouts up to her with a megaphone, but can't get her to respond.) On a better day, the two, dressed in bunny ears and tails, play Catch-the-Bunny until they're interrupted by an invitation for the older sister—"Right in the middle of our bunny adventure! My sister didn't even say good-bye." That night, the younger child's act of revenge at least gets the sister's attention: "Pretty soon, a dangerous leopard was standing in front of me. ‘WHERE IS MY TOOTHBRUSH?' she roared." Wewer doesn't promise an end to the hostilities, but her honesty will touch siblings on both sides of the age divide. Ages 3–up. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Shirley Nelson
A little boy loves playing with his big sister. But typically he enjoys annoying her as well. When she struts like a giraffe and ignores him, he pretends he is a skunk. Sometimes they play together and romp around the house like big bears or hop like rabbits through the forest. Then she runs off in the middle of their games to be with her friend. He decides to play a trick on her and steal her toothbrush. She angrily chases him and when she catches him, the toothbrush sails out of his hand and lands in a bird's nest. She helps him retrieve it and they are friends again. Colorful illustrations show the siblings in animal suits as they play their games of pretend, each animal matching the current mood. This imaginative story clearly illustrates the relationships between older and younger siblings. Children will laugh at their antics. However, adults may cringe at the last illustration showing them brushing their teeth, the sister apparently using the recently retrieved toothbrush. Reviewer: Shirley Nelson
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—A boy with a vivid imagination tells about his relationship with his older sister. Sometimes they have great fun together pretending to be cuddly bears, big birds, or happy rabbits. Other times his sister is a giraffe who struts around ignoring him, and he's a skunk in response. When she leaves in the middle of a grand adventure to go swimming with a friend, he plots revenge and filches her toothbrush. In the guise of a dangerous leopard, she demands its return. Wearing his superfast rabbit shoes, the boy takes off out the front door and a fun-filled chase ensues. The pair return home friends and the girl even says that she might play Catch the Bunny the next day. The text tells a good story, but the colorful cartoon illustrations take it to the next level. The costumes of the children, their spot-on expressions, and a bevy of small details make the delightful artwork the centerpiece of the book. An excellent take on sibling relations that many children will recognize.—Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH
Kirkus Reviews - Kikus Reviews

An absolutely engaging, European-flavored look at the relationship between a little boy and his older sister.A small boy is quite peeved when his sister acts the giraffe, strutting around, ignoring him, not answering when he shouts, "DO YOU WANT TO PLAY?" "When my sister is a giraffe, then I'm a smelly skunk" he says snarkily. The pictures tell more of the story: A giraffe with his sister's face strides by as a little boy in a skunk costume farts merrily. But sometimes he and his sister are bears, romping all over the house, or birds,flying in the sky. (Mom pops out of the chimney with a sign saying, "Lunch is ready!") But one day while playing Catch-the-Bunny, they are interrupted by Penny, who asks his sister to go swimming. Off she goes, which makes little brother brood all afternoon—and steal her toothbrush. Then she becomes a roaring leopard, and she chases him until he gets it back. The family dog, teddy bear and a couple of mice appear in most scenes, their comical expressions commenting on the action, and plenty of other engaging details abound. With so much to look at, this sly and oh-so-truthful snapshot of sibling relations will see plenty of repeated examination. (Picture book. 4-8)

Kirkus Reviews

An absolutely engaging, European-flavored look at the relationship between a little boy and his older sister.A small boy is quite peeved when his sister acts the giraffe, strutting around, ignoring him, not answering when he shouts, "DO YOU WANT TO PLAY?" "When my sister is a giraffe, then I'm a smelly skunk" he says snarkily. The pictures tell more of the story: A giraffe with his sister's face strides by as a little boy in a skunk costume farts merrily. But sometimes he and his sister are bears, romping all over the house, or birds,flying in the sky. (Mom pops out of the chimney with a sign saying, "Lunch is ready!") But one day while playing Catch-the-Bunny, they are interrupted by Penny, who asks his sister to go swimming. Off she goes, which makes little brother brood all afternoon—and steal her toothbrush. Then she becomes a roaring leopard, and she chases him until he gets it back. The family dog, teddy bear and a couple of mice appear in most scenes, their comical expressions commenting on the action, and plenty of other engaging details abound. With so much to look at, this sly and oh-so-truthful snapshot of sibling relations will see plenty of repeated examination. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735840645
Publisher:
NorthSouth Books
Publication date:
02/01/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
AD570L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

 Sometimes my sister is a big, cuddly bear. Then I’m a bear too and we romp and stomp until the whole house shakes.

 Sometimes my sister and I are birds with big, strong wings. When there’s a storm outside we soar high above the clouds.

Meet the Author

Iris Wewer was born in Cuxhaven, Germany, and studied communication design in Wiesbaden. This is her first book for children.

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