The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity

The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity

by Jill Lepore
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Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have just purchased a second copy of this book to send to a friend. The work deserves a much wider audience than that of adademia. It is deep meditation, not just on this war, but on war itself, on what causes wars, on how opponents differently perceive the experience, and on how the description of war by historians changes the experience itself. More than anything I have ever read before, this book also humanizes the plight of American Indians as a population faced with a massive physical and cultural invasion. At the same time, it provides some shocking insights into how, in war, even apparently civilized people rapidly descend into barbarism, while managing somehow to rationalize their conduct into something justifiable and just. Finally, the book does not have an academic tone. It reads like a mystery story - clear, fast-paced and dramatic. And the mystery is that of human perversity. I recommend it highly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a revisionist, opinionated work. It is a simplistic view of three hundred year old events.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is very informative but i was extremely disappointed that only 1 brief mention was made of Philip's(Metacomet.Metacom,Pometacom) older brother Alexander(Wamsutta) being murdered by poisoning at the hands of Governor Bradford prior to the start of the war. Nan Apashamen of the Wamanoag and deceased historian at Plymouth Plantation was working on research which suggested that "Moanam" was a later name for Alexander and that Alexander was in fact Philip's father, not his brother. Alexander, Philip,Sassamon and others went to the newly formed Harvard College. Alexander had been summoned at gunpoint to see Bradford, who was a military man. He was in excellent health. Three days after sequestered interrogation by Bradford, he returned to die.
Guest More than 1 year ago
King Philip's war is a war that few Americans (even those who have been through the American educational system) have heard about. But Lepore does a good job illustrating the effects of the war on colonial New England and settler-native relations for years to come. If you want to learn about how colonial race relations and cultural history, do yourself a favor, and read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an intersting combo of cultural and military history. She sometimes goes beyond her evidence in extrapolating, but not too far (as is common in cultural history) to be incredible. The biggest fault is the lack of a coherent narrative of the war itself.