ISBN-10:
1848215878
ISBN-13:
9781848215870
Pub. Date:
03/10/2014
Publisher:
Wiley
Nanoscale Microwave Engineering: Optical Control of Nanodevices / Edition 1

Nanoscale Microwave Engineering: Optical Control of Nanodevices / Edition 1

by Charlotte Tripon-Canseliet, Jean Chazelas
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781848215870
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 03/10/2014
Series: FOCUS Series
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Charlotte Tripon-Canseliet is Associate Professor at University Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC), France. She has been involved in the research of microwave photonics for eight years, specifically in the design of ultrafast integrated devices. Her research interest focuses on state-of-the-art evolution of microwave photonics devices.

Jean Chazelas is Scientific Director at Thales DMS (Defence Mission Systems) Division, UK. He is involved in the creation of international joint research laboratories and in numerous European and international projects and contracts in the field of microwaves, photonics and nanotechnologies.

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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION ix

CHAPTER 1. NANOTECHNOLOGY-BASED MATERIALS AND THEIRINTERACTION WITH LIGHT 1

1.1. Review of main trends in 3D to 0D materials 1

1.1.1. Main trends in 3D materials for radio frequency (RF)electronics and photonics 1

1.1.2. Main trends in 2D materials for RF electronics andphotonics 2

1.1.3. Review of other two-dimensional structures for RFelectronic applications 5

1.1.4. Main trends in 1D materials for RF electronics andphotonics 6

1.1.5. Other 1D materials for RF applications 9

1.1.6. Some attempts on 0D materials 13

1.2. Light/matter interactions 13

1.2.1. Fundamental electromagnetic properties of 3D bulkmaterials 14

1.2.2. Linear optical transitions 22

1.2.3. Bandgap engineering in nanomaterials: effect ofconfinement/sizing on bandgap structure 23

1.3. Focus on two light/matter interactions at the materiallevel 26

1.3.1. Photoconductivity in semiconductor material 26

1.3.2. Example of light absorption in metals: plasmonics 45

CHAPTER 2. ELECTROMAGNETIC MATERIAL CHARACTERIZATION ATNANOSCALE 51

2.1. State of the art of macroscopic material characterizationtechniques in the microwave domain with dedicated equipment 51

2.1.1. Static resistivity 51

2.1.2. Carrier and doping density 53

2.1.3. Contact resistance and Schottky barriers 55

2.1.4. Transient methods for the determination of carrierdynamics 56

2.1.5. Frequency methods for complex permittivity determinationin frequency 57

2.2. Evolution of techniques for nanomaterial characterization60

2.2.1. The CNT transistor 60

2.2.2. Optimizing DC measurements 60

2.2.3. Pulsed I-V measurements 61

2.2.4. Capacitance–voltage measurements 61

2.3. Micro- to nanoexperimental techniques for thecharacterization of 2D, 1D and 0D materials 62

CHAPTER 3. NANOTECHNOLOGY-BASED COMPONENTS AND DEVICES65

3.1. Photoconductive switches for microwave applications 67

3.1.1. Major stakes 67

3.1.2. Basic principles 67

3.1.3. State of the art of photoconductive switching 71

3.1.4. Photoconductive switching at nanoscale – examples72

3.2. 2D materials for microwave applications 74

3.2.1. Graphene for RF applications 74

3.2.2. Optoelectronic functions 76

3.2.3. Other potential applications of graphene 77

3.3. 1D materials for RF electronics and photonics 78

3.3.1. Carbon nanotubes in microwave and RF circuits 78

3.3.2. CNT microwave transistors 79

3.3.3. RF absorbing and shielding materials based on CNTcomposites 82

3.3.4. Interconnects 83

CHAPTER 4. NANOTECHNOLOGY-BASED SUBSYSTEMS 85

4.1. Sampling and analog-to-digital converter 85

4.1.1. Basic principles of sampling and subsampling 87

4.1.2. Optical sampling of microwave signals 89

4.2. Photomixing principle 89

4.3. Nanoantennas for microwave to THz applications 91

4.3.1. Optical control of antennas in the microwave domain91

4.3.2. THz photoconducting antennas 91

4.3.3. 2D material-based THz antennas 92

4.3.4. 1D material-based antennas 92

4.3.5. Challenges for future applications 96

CONCLUSIONS AND PERSPECTIVES 99

C.1. Conclusions 99

C.2. Perspectives: beyond graphene structures for advancedmicrowave functions 100

C.2.1. van der Waals heterostructures 101

C.2.2. Beyond graphene: heterogeneous integration of graphenewith other 2D semiconductor materials 103

C.2.3. Graphene allotropes 103

BIBLIOGRAPHY 105

INDEX 119

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