The Napoleon of Notting Hill

The Napoleon of Notting Hill

by G. K. Chesterton
4.7 119

Paperback

$13.46
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Friday, October 20 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Overview

The Napoleon of Notting Hill by G. K. Chesterton

In THE NAPOLEON OF NOTTING HILL, Chesterton examines the question "What if the Crown of England devolved upon a common man?" He selects Auberon Quin, and a more common individual it is difficult to imagine. That is, to all appearances...except that deep within Quin burns a desire for the exceptional, a love of individuality, and a deep and abiding humorous tolerance.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781438519043
Publisher: Standard Publications, Incorporated
Publication date: 06/08/2009
Pages: 166
Product dimensions: 7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.35(d)

About the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, (29 May 1874 - 14 June 1936), better known as G. K. Chesterton, was an English writer, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox". Time magazine has observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories-first carefully turning them inside out."

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Napoleon of Notting Hill 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 119 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I originally wanted to read this book because I had heard so much about G. K. Chesterton. I had read the Complete Father Brown mysteries many years ago, but now wanted to read something else by him and had to start somewhere. It sounds like I picked a good book of his to begin with, it supposedly being one of his best fiction books. However, I honestly was disappointed. Not because Chesterton was a bad writer and that this was a bad book, but because I am an average reader and had a hard time trying to understand what the writer was saying. Most times, I always had the feeling that I was missing the point altogether. It would probably have been better to read a companion guide to the book or something. I was able to find some inspiring quotes throughout the book, and towards the end, I found myself liking Adam Wayne immensely (I can identify with the character and his love for his hometown in the face of people wanting to come in and ruin the very things that are lovely about it). Good book? Probably. But an average reader (like myself) will have a hard time understanding it unless using a companion guide. I would recommend it to anybody who admires C. S. Lewis (since Lewis admired Chesterton) and those who love high art and literature.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lydia Nevin More than 1 year ago
Hilarious and sometimes thought-provoking. If you have the right sense of humor, it's lots of fun. Some parts get a little slow, but it's well worth it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Several OCR errors on every page, not worth trying to read in this format
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I recognized some of the humour but I just couldn't stay interested in this book. Written in turn of the century english with archaic slang and dialectical nuances it just doesn't have any flow to it. I'd much rather read a play in old english than this. And that's saying something.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nancy Greene More than 1 year ago
Still holds up
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago