The Narrative of Sojourner Truth

The Narrative of Sojourner Truth

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Overview

The Narrative of Sojourner Truth by Sojourner Truth, Olive Gilbert

This inspiring memoir, first published in 1850, recounts the struggles a distinguished African-American abolitionist and champion of women's rights. Sojourner Truth tells of her life in slavery, her self-liberation, and her travels across America in pursuit of racial and sexual equality. Essential reading for students of American history.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781617206481
Publisher: Wilder Publications
Publication date: 02/10/2012
Pages: 94
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.23(d)

About the Author

Sojourner Truth, born Isabella, a slave in Ulster County, New York, around 1797, became an abolitionist, orator, and preacher, and eventually an icon for strong black women. She was emancipated by state law in 1827, and the following year she moved to New York City, where she found work in wealthy households and became increasingly involved in unorthodox religious groups. In the early 1830s she joined the commune or “Kingdom” of the Prophet Matthias. By 1843 she had transformed herself into the itinerant preacher Sojourner Truth, and spent most of the next thirteen years in Northampton, Massachusetts. Illiterate, she dictated her autobiography to her neighbor Olive Gilbert, and the Narrative of Sojourner Truth was published in 1850. The following year Truth set out to promote her book and to speak out on abolition and women’s rights. In the 1870s Truth’s friend and informal manager Frances Titus compiled a new edition of the Narrative, adding the “Book of Life,” a scrapbook comprising essays, articles, and letters from Truth’s contemporary admirers. Truth died in Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1883, and the following year Titus published a new edition that included “A Memorial Chapter.”

Nell Irvin Painter is the author of Sojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol and Standing at Armageddon, the United States, 1877-1919, The Narrative of Hosea Hudson and Exodusters: Black Migration to Kansas After Reconstruction. She is Edwards Professor of History at Princeton University, where she currently heads the program in African-American Studies.

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Narrative of Sojourner Truth (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Crystal Montanez More than 1 year ago
I am a high school sophomore. I was recommended to read this biography from my World Literature teacher for a project discussing Slavery. I strongly believe this biography is not for everyone. Especially for myself there were some parts of the book that I grew bored of. For example, when the author talks about how wonderful Isabella, also famously known as Sojourner Truth, is she over repeatedly uses different words to get the same point across or fraises sentences that repeat the same information. When reading the biography it sometimes seems like the author is just putting information in words to finish the book. But, I do have to say that one of my favorite parts of this book was the part where the author includes how inspirational she is too many people in her speeches. It really surprised me how she originally was a horrible speaker in front of audiences. It showed me that if you really if you put your heart and time into something you truly love it will make a difference in you and others. I would have loved to live to hear one of her speeches. The author did an excellent job on describing certain events that most authors do not write about the person they are doing a biography on. Describing the little moments in Sojourner Truths life came to show that even those little things can make a huge impact on a person’s life. Besides being greatly informed about her life this biography did really show me how difficult it was to be a born a slave. I would recommend this biography to anyone who is interested in learning more about Sojourner Truth and Slavery. Even though some parts may be a little exhausting once you get past them it gets interesting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think Soujourner Truth was honoring God with what she had to go through! I read a book on her and its one of my favorites!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sojourner is an important person in the african american people back then.In battle creek,MICHAGAN
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Through the pain filled story on these pages we learn of birth in captivity, being sold, sold again, sold yet again, and sold once again; and each time into sexually and physically abusive families -- New York families. The loss of her children, the murder of her husband only steele Sojourner to speak out against slavery across the Nation, to seek restitution for her people, to unite Abolitionists against slavery. She is, at times, in the company of and providing guidance to Frederick Douglass and President U.S. Grant. A legendary witness to American history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
StephF1 More than 1 year ago
The Narrative of Sojourner Truth is a very informative collection of different stories and happenings in the life of Sojourner Truth. The book itself has a lot of new information on Truth that not everyone knows from just background knowledge. If you like biographies and learning something about slavery and women's rights then you will like this book. Honestly, I didn't like the read very much, but these topics are not my area of interest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read one of Sojourners speeches at a womens convention (Aint I a Woman, is what its called if u want to read it) and I love how she speaks so freely in a time when it was thought America was equal, but it was only equal for certain people, and she wasn't one of them. I'm glad I get to live in a society where there are equal rights for men and women of different races. =>
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