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Native Dancer
     

Native Dancer

3.0 2
by Eva Jolene Boyd
 

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Known as "The Gray Ghost" because of his color and his amazing ability on the racetrack, Native Dancer won all but one of his 22 starts. His lone loss came in the 1953 Kentucky Derby, when he was upset by Dark Star. Native Dancer went on to win the Preakness and Belmont Stakes. But his brilliance was evident even at two, when he won all nine of his starts and was

Overview

Known as "The Gray Ghost" because of his color and his amazing ability on the racetrack, Native Dancer won all but one of his 22 starts. His lone loss came in the 1953 Kentucky Derby, when he was upset by Dark Star. Native Dancer went on to win the Preakness and Belmont Stakes. But his brilliance was evident even at two, when he won all nine of his starts and was named co-Horse of the Year, an honor not bestowed on a two-year-old horse again until 20 years later, when Secretariat was named Horse of the Year in 1972.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781581501766
Publisher:
Eclipse Press
Publication date:
09/28/2007
Series:
Thoroughbred Legends (Unnumbered) Series
Edition description:
Illustrate
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.51(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Boyd has written articles for The Thoroughbred Record, Turf and Sports Digest, SPUR, The Backstretch, and The Blood Horse.

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Native Dancer 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A brief insight into one of the greatest legends in horse racing. It's a straight forward easy read, leaving the emotion and magic of this racing phenomenon to the reader's imagination.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The author did a decent job trying to portray the era of the book. However, it at times failed to follow through on its characters. For example, throughout the book, it commented on the great love relationship between the groom and the horse, but the retiring of the horse and the farewell of the groom to the horse was extremely anti-climatic. To the point, at the end of the book all characters were profiled for what they went on to do with their lives. However, the groom was never mentioned. The author did a nice job of trying to portray the times of the people, i.e. television, power of media, etc. However, his historical references on occasion were inaccurate. The most flagrant error was stating that Louisville, Kentucky is on the banks of the Mississippi River. I was surprised the book's editors failed to catch this point. To me that explained why the author was not able to build his story and develop the 'thoroughbred magic' of the equine industry into his book. It is very hard to research a topic and be able to create the passion through writing. The book did a good job where the research material was available, but at times I could feel when the author was trying to fill space. It was at those points, I would put the book down for a few days. I got tired of the rhetoric and wanted to learn more about the horse and his 'family'. Finally, out of curiosity, I would pick it back up and read some more.