Nature of Economies

Nature of Economies

by Jane Jacobs
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Overview

Nature of Economies by Jane Jacobs

From the revered author of the classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities comes a new book that will revolutionize the way we think about the economy.

Starting from the premise that human beings "exist wholly within nature as part of natural order in every respect," Jane Jacobs has focused her singular eye on the natural world in order to discover the fundamental models for a vibrant economy. The lessons she discloses come from fields as diverse as ecology, evolution, and cell biology. Written in the form of a Platonic dialogue among five fictional characters, The Nature of Economies is as astonishingly accessible and clear as it is irrepressibly brilliant and wise–a groundbreaking yet humane study destined to become another world-altering classic.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400033089
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/13/2002
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Jane Jacobs is the author of several books, including the classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, which redefined urban studies and economic policy, and the bestselling Systems of Survival. She lives and works in Toronto.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Nature of Economies 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Perhaps someone will write about the 'Nature of Economies', and soon, and I pray that this title will be released for him or her. This book, however, is a ramble of mean observations, couched in an especially irritating format that makes one feel stupid, like an eavesdropper on a pitiable cocktail conversation. To really read this book, one needs only read the Epilogue, 'Hiram was delighted to have Armbruster (sic) relieve him of the book.' The real writing and discovery is in the Notes, some twenty-five pages of them, in which the sense of economy is hinted at, but not at all consummated. Buy the book? Read the Notes. I got my copy at the library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago