Nemesis

Nemesis

by Philip Roth
3.0 74

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Nemesis 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 73 reviews.
KenCady More than 1 year ago
I hate being the one to write the first review. I dread that others will come along later and point out how I didn't get the book at all, or I missed the important stuff. And a Phillip Roth novel- no reviews yet? Roth's new novel, Nemesis, is about a polio epidemic in 1944. The war is going on when suddenly young people throughout Newark are hit by polio. Roth befuddles me often as his books are either very appealing or a big turnoff to me. But Nemesis is magnificent. It brings the epidemic home, engages the reader as it both educates and infuriates, and the real Nemesis proves to be God, not polio. No, I didn't give anything away there as it is only my interpretation. But you will find yourself having many conversations with yourself when you put this short novel down.
radioguy More than 1 year ago
Mr. Ross is always worthwhile, but I feel this is one of his lesser achievements. I never really felt it went any where. It rather droned on and was lacking the thematic and narrative flare of his other works. Rather flat all around. A title in his minor catalog.
Sandito-Gordito More than 1 year ago
It appears to me that Mr Roth, in his old age of 78, has gotten into a position of putting out publications which are trashy in order to reap in great profits by depending on his past great works. This tale of about 130 pages devotes the first 100 pages to a somewhat interesting story which he drops like a hot potato. After the story somewhat ends at page 100, Roth uses the next 30 pages to sort of explain what and why the first 100 occured. It's as if Roth wrote the first hundred pages and decided that he had given enough of himself and then tried to close out in the next senseless 30 pages.
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