Never Drink Coffee During a Business Meeting: Insider Advice From a Top Female CEO

Never Drink Coffee During a Business Meeting: Insider Advice From a Top Female CEO

by Liza Marie Garcia

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781630476489
Publisher: Morgan James Publishing
Publication date: 03/01/2016
Pages: 176
Product dimensions: 4.90(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Liza Marie Garcia is the CEO of Enterprise Communication Services, an all-woman owned and operated, Professional Services to IT company located in Tampa, Florida. Her first venture, Byrne Integrated Communications, was one of the very first telecommunication services firm in the US with offices in Seattle and Portland. Garcia employs her extensive Fortune 100/500 corporate experience to provide a “Zero Impact” experience to her clients during their technology upgrades.

Garcia sits on the Board of Directors for Little Light of Mine, a foundation providing photography services to children facing life-threating illness. She is an active member of the International CEO think tank group, Vistage in Tampa Florida.

Read an Excerpt

It’s no small accomplishment to earn an undergraduate or graduate degree in business. Congratulations! Women now achieve 40 percent of all the MBA’s granted each year in the US. So, what can you expect next? Well, the good news is that there are more opportunities for young women entering today’s workplace than ever before. The bad news is that the business world can still be mighty unfriendly to them, at least in comparison to what young male graduates experience.

Let’s consider the wage gap between women and men with business degrees. “It isn’t very significant when you’re just starting out and usually it corresponds to grades and course selection,” says Marianne Betrand, an Economics Professor at the University of Chicago School of Business, citing results of studies on female compensation among female MBA’s. But, women still earn just a fraction of what men earn for comparable jobs. Betrand says that what’s even more striking is how much that gap grows over time. (Demast, Alison. “MBA wage gap between men, women grows.” SFGate May 8, 2104. Accessed February 28, 2015. http://www.sfgate.com/business/article/MBA-wage-gap-between-men-women-grows-4153232.php).

According to this and other studies, 10 years ago women were better off. “Today the pay gap among graduates of elite business schools is widening. Where we were once on near-equal footing, female graduates now earn between 79 and 93% for every dollar paid to their male counterparts. In a study by the Catalyst—a non-profit group that focuses on expanding opportunities for women in business—female MBA’s are paid on average $4,600 less than in their early jobs than men and the figure grows to $30,000 by mid-career.” (Lang, Ilene. “Take 5: The MBA Pay Gap.” May 23, 2011. Accessed February, 2014. http://www.catalyst.org/blog/catalyzing/take-5-mba-pay-gap) This should be making you angry. If it doesn’t, stop reading!

Why is this? If women are graduating in greater numbers from business schools, how come we aren’t earning more in the workforce? If you’ve just graduated, likely you’ve heard about this in your business program. There are many factors that affect and contribute to wage disparity. Women leaving the workforce is a big one. Not earning the same pay as our male counterparts is a huge disincentive. This is infuriating to me.

So how do we start to fix it? We will never achieve parity if we don’t stay in the workforce. We’ve got to stay in, in larger numbers, and we’ve got be successful. Not just in achieving wage parity but in offering women ways of accommodating both career and family. Things will never move forward if business remains dominated by men. History has proven that only women will take up and fight for our own causes.

These are the tough issues all career women face at some point. I certainly don’t have all of the answers but I can tell you what worked for me. I have always had a nanny. I hired her with the same amount of diligence and scrutiny that I give my new hires. I have been fortunate to have found a wonderful woman who has become part of our family and her dedication and love for my children has enabled me to relentlessly pursue my career. Over the years, she’s become completely devoted to my children and I trust her implicitly. Other women have utilized day care and the assistance of family members to manage the responsibility that having children brings. It’s a choice, but it can be done if a career is your choice.

I could write a whole book about managing a career and family and still not provide a solution that would adequately suit everyone and I don’t want to start another episode of the “Mommy Wars.” It seems to me that we haven’t found the perfect balance for families yet, whether mom is in the workplace or staying at home. So let’s just agree to work towards it together. These issues are intensely personal.

For now, let’s assume you are a career woman in for the long haul. You do want to become a top executive. You want to be a CEO. You want a stellar career and you aren’t daunted by the fact that you’ll likely have to work harder for less pay as a woman and that you’ll probably have to pay a large portion of what you earn to cover child care if you start a family. So let’s focus on the absence of female role models and mentors in the workforce because this is one we can make headway on right now. We must take advantage of the women who are there.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: All Successful Women Have an Unstoppable Drive

Chapter 2: Congratulations, You’ve got your degree! Now What?

Chapter 3: Welcome to the world of Women in Business, You’re Gonna be Lonely!

Chapter 4: The Difference between Female and Male Managers: Women’s Superior Soft Skills

Chapter 5: Women’s Weakness—Emotionality the Double-Edged Sword

Chapter 6: The Double Whammy of Being

Chapter 7: Listen More, Talk Less,The Magic of Active Listening

Chapter 8: Corporations are Teams

Chapter 9: Play like the Boys—Learn to GolfThe Takeaway

Chapter 10: The Importance of Mentor Relationships

Chapter 11: Practical Appearance Matters

Chapter 12: Never Drink Coffee before a Business Meeting

Chapter 13: When to Go For It

Chapter 14: Staying Relevant in Business

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