Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time / Edition 1

Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time / Edition 1

by Keith Ferrazzi
3.9 70
ISBN-10:
0385512058
ISBN-13:
2900385512052
Pub. Date:
02/22/2005
Publisher:
Crown Religion/Business/Forum
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Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 71 reviews.
Walter-Lake More than 1 year ago
The book really was a little slow at the beginning but it ramped up after that. I think Keith looks at relationships in a strategic way, but in the end it teaches you that to get something you have to give something. In business today there seems to be always a hook or someone asking for a side deal to move business forward, which seems what his book kinda concludes. Good book overall, good reading to make you think.... read if you are in need to grow your business based on meeting alot of people.
blm51389 More than 1 year ago
As a aspiring Business major I took a certain interest to this book. I thought of it as a rough guideline for future success! I highly reccommend this to both Business majors or to the person that has doubts about his/her plans in their personal life. Very insightful, chalk full of honesty and tid its for success!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don't understand why this book is so popular. I got very little out of it. The topic can be boiled down to what sociologists call social capital, nothing new there. The author rambles and does a lot of name dropping (which means nothing to the average person). He is a very poor writer. Skip this one and read a good book on networking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As Ferrazzi admits several times in his book, he is a "shameless self-promoter". And sadly that is all this book is about. The examples Ferrazzi provides in chapters such as "Be Interesting" are all anecdotes from the life of another young MBA. There is extremely little research or support for the recommendations. But that is OK because there are no recommendations that you haven't already thought of doing. Perhaps the only thing you didn't already do was 'Throw FABULOUS dinner parties, like mine!'. And now that you know that, you can save your time and read something useful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a must read for people in the IT / High-tech / Marketing and sales business. The reason for my headline is because of the review from Stan. I can completely see where Stan is coming from and I agree with his assessment. For a technical person (a non-suit lets say) this book is border-lining on blasphemy. Let's just say Ayn Rand will be turning in her grave if someone had read her this book. But, lets snap back into reality. You can protest anything and everything that you consider as immoral in your mind. For someone else, they might genuinely like making connections to move ahead in business and life. Sift through what you don't agree with and look at rest of the content. I can promise you that you cannot put this book down once you start reading it. You gotta respect a guy who came from humble beginnings, got into Yale and is featured in who's who under 40. Highly recommended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book came uploaded as an eBook file when I purchased my PDA. What is in this book is common sense for the most part. What makes it so great at least in my perspective is that it is the basics of building strong relationships. There are countless other books that cover the same subject but have more complicated explainations and unneccessary methods. Books that confuse the reader rather than lay out information so that it can be easily understood and applied. This is a great book for professionals or anyone looking to improve themselves.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is barely worth the read. Maybe a couple of good hints, maybe. But realistically, one can not but help think while reading this book is there anyone on earth more full of himself than Mr. Ferrazzi? Every action in the life of the author is predicated upon an ulterior motive. No wonder there is such mistrust and disrespect for sales people and honest businessmen.
Leo_B More than 1 year ago
Never Eat Alone is a pretty great read if you are looking for new tactics and helpful tips to expand your professional circle and work your way up the ladder. Keith Ferrazzi, CEO of Ferrazzi Greenlight, tells his own story along with anecdotes about people he knows about how they all improved their lives through smart goal-setting, networking, and research. Ferrazzi's objective is to teach the aspiring professionals that read his book on the value of relationships in the business world. Within the first few pages of the book, Ferrazzi makes it clear that the business world has moved past the "John Wayne individualism" (19) of the 20th Century and is now comprised of relationships that interconnect the entire world. Everyone wants something, and wants someone to satisfy their needs, and Ferrazzi explains that "networking was about finding ways to make other people more successful" (63). Through the use of personal anecdotes about his rise from the son of a steel mill worker to the CEO of his own company, Keith Ferrazzi provides excellent support for his arguments on the merit of reaching out to others in order to build a stronger professional circle that will take you farther than you ever could go on your own. For example, the story early on in the book when Ferrazzi asserts the importance of never "keeping score" of the favors you give away about how when Ferrazzi attempted to move into the entertainment industry in Los Angeles and met with an entrepreneur named David. When Ferrazzi asked him if he could call in a favor and introduce him to a senior executive at Paramount, David declined because he believed he had a finite amount of favors from this executive and that the relationship could wear thin but Ferrazzi knew better that relationships become stronger the more you use them. He capped of this anecdote by explaining that ten years later, nobody had heard of David or knew what he was doing. Ferrazzi lives and breathes his advice every day as he goes out to run his company along with writing books and speaking at colleges. His success in following his advice on networking and building relationships is impressive. Through his interactions with others he rose from a middle class coal mining town in Pennsylvania to running his own company, One example of the importance of relationships is when he points out that students everywhere ask him the secret of being successful and his answer is "generosity" (26). While the students are confused he expands his answer by explaining that the road to Yale and Harvard business school was not paved by him solely but by the generosity of friends and acquaintances in his circle. He states that relationships are built on trust and trust is built by not asking what others can do for you, but what you can do for others. Immediately after that line, Ferrazzi says "The currency of real networking is not greed but generosity" (33). As a whole, Never Eat Alone is a great place to start as a professional looking to expand his circle of associates and propel themselves forward in their careers. Keith Ferrazzi shares his secrets of building genuine relationships that can last years and serve you immensely. Being great by yourself is not enough anymore, you need to be great and have great people surrounding you and helping you become greater. Never Eat Alone can help you take that first step.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In “Never Eat Alone,” Ferrazi sets out to explain how building and maintaining relationships leads to success. Ferrazi’s intended audience ranges from a person trying to become president of the local PTA group to the CEO of a fortune 500 company. Ferrazi’s steps to success are adaptable to any goal. Keith Ferrazi is the founder and CEO of Ferrazi Green Light Corporation, a research institution and consulting firm. Ferrazi has climbed his way to the top of the business world. One of the biggest reasons why, besides his passion and motivation, is his remarkable skill to connect with others. The son of a steel worker and a cleaning lady, Ferrazi was granted a top of the line education from the generosity of his father’s boss. After receiving a scholarship to Yale and a Harvard MBA, he went on to take over several different executive positions.  Ferrazi, throughout the entire book, emphasizes how important generosity is. The main difference between people just networking and people building genuine relationships is generosity. Ferrazi distinguishes the differences between “a networking jerk” and a good networker. He explains that a networking jerk is “a schmooze artist, eyes darting at every event in a constant search for a bigger fish to fry” (page 56).  Over the course of this book, he describes his system of reaching out to people in practical principles. These practical principles have helped him develop a growing network of over 5,000 relationships. One of the most important ways to network is maintaining a relationship. Ferrazi calls the act “pinging.” His term means to keep in touch in creative ways. He writes that, “you have to feed the fire of your network or it will wither or die.” Reaching out to those who are in your circle should happen all the time, not just when you are in need of a favor.  Another main point that he focuses on is not keeping score. Ferrazi strongly believes in the mindset of not thinking about what people can do for you, but what you can do for others. Real networking is not greed, but generosity. Ferrazi gives a promising point that people can climb to the top by asking others “how can I help you?” This theory is strongly supported by the fact that he has been named one of Crain’s 40 under 40 and was selected as a global leader for tomorrow by the Davos World Economic. Also throughout the book, profiles of famous people that have made the “connectors hall of fame” exemplify some of the strategies that successful individuals have. These profiles range from Eleanor Roosevelt to the Dalai Lama. Ferrazi is extensive in supporting his own strategies through others’ success stories.  Ferrazi’s outlook on networking and business culture is refreshing. All of the networking tips he gives are acts of kindness that should be applied to all forms of interaction in every setting. The keys of success Ferrazi gives will not only help in the workplace but will be beneficial in life. The mindset of Keith Ferrazi is one that will change your view on networking but more importantly, will change your opinion on success.  Every reader can become “a member of the club” after reading “Never Eat Alone.”
CENY More than 1 year ago
The author works in a context where his advice would work, but it won't work in all fields. He's a marketing whiz, but in the book he does not mention important parts of his identity that differ from that of most of the rest of us, and so his advice is kind of out there for the rest of us who don't share that identity. Interview people while working out? Throw lavish dinner parties yourself? Sing Happy Birthday to people by phone? Those tips may work for someone with his identity and profession, but they wouldn't work in mine.
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