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New Kid, New Scene: A Guide to Moving and Switching Schools
     

New Kid, New Scene: A Guide to Moving and Switching Schools

by Debbie Glasser, Emily Schenck, American Psychological Association Staff (Contribution by)
 

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Starting out as the new kid in a new school can be like performing as an extra in a movie. Kids can feel alone, pushed to the side, and unsure of where they could possibly fit in or if there is a place for them. New Kid, New Scene gives kids the ins and outs of navigating new surroundings, making new friends (as well as staying in touch with old ones), and finding

Overview

Starting out as the new kid in a new school can be like performing as an extra in a movie. Kids can feel alone, pushed to the side, and unsure of where they could possibly fit in or if there is a place for them. New Kid, New Scene gives kids the ins and outs of navigating new surroundings, making new friends (as well as staying in touch with old ones), and finding a place that feels like their own. It is full of real-life stories from kids who have the same experience — facing a new school and new life and how they were able to survive and even thrive in their new environment. It is packed with useful advice and questions for kids when they are worried or upset and it shows them that they are a star in this new change in their life and not just an extra.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - RevaBeth Russell
This book accomplishes what it sets out to do: ease a young student into moving to a new school. Using a movie theme with a new set, plot, casting call, and characters the reader is guided to a new adventure or coming attraction. It starts with reassurances that these worries are normal and has the reader list their three biggest worries. The reader will learn that other pre-teen and teens have had worries and how they played out. Fears can be worries that need to be looked at with the facts that actually happen. The reader is given tips to recognize and how to make a comfort zone, to focus on the familiar then try the new things bit by bit, and be flexible and embrace change. Always ask for help because it is available from parents, teachers, guidance counselors, and even other kids. The reader is reminded that they have experienced many new changes, even before they moved into a relationship with a new teacher, coach or sport and things turned out fine. There are little vignettes throughout about other kids and their experiences. Readers might find that comforting; the issue of bullies is also addressed. Remember, help is only one "ask for help question" away. There are tips for getting to know yourself so you can be batter at making new friends and activities in your new school. Reviewer: RevaBeth Russell
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Students making the transition to new schools, new communities, or new homes will always experience a bit of anxiety, and this self-help book offers practical advice on how to make those changes smoother. The ideas and suggestions are sound and practical, if not occasionally generic and repetitive. The basic mantra is to keep a positive attitude, be flexible, and try new things, whether they be joining a sports team, trying out for a play, or simply saying hello to one friendly face. Similar advice could be given to just about anybody experiencing any kind of social anxiety, whether the situation is new or comfortably familiar. There are some useful suggestions about the importance of maintaining old friendships and how to balance the pushes and pulls between old friends and new. Unfortunately, the writing sometimes becomes pedestrian, with the zippiest and most engaging part coming in the introduction, with comparisons being made between new situations and being an actor in a movie facing a new script, a new set, and an unfamiliar cast. There are descriptions and quotes from "real" kids who have had similar experiences, but there is an almost Stepford-like quality to them that doesn't quite ring true. Bulleted lists, quizzes, and notebook and movie-script sidebars add details, and the eye-catching layout will keep students flipping through the pages.—Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA
VOYA - Rochelle Garfinkel
As the title implies, this is a guide for students who find themselves in the angst-ridden position of switching schools. Appropriate for middle grades, New Kid, New Scene does a good job of walking teens and tweens through the stages they will experience when they move. The movie theme from the title remains consistent from the first sentence all the way to the last, yet avoids becoming a tiresome cliche. A plot summary and "Coming Attractions" completes every chapter to provide a review and to preview what is next. Good advice abounds for kids who are at any stage of moving—whether they are still preparing or they have already landed in a new school. A handful of exercises are included to help students reflect on their "true self" and a bit more introspection. The fallback advice is always to talk about their feelings with a trusted adult, as would be expected from an APA publication. Two-color photos of real young adults are interspersed throughout the book to give a face to the many stories, and quotes are used to help the reader understand s/he is not alone. The layout is inviting and will not overwhelm younger readers, but is also not so immature as to scare away older ones. The authors and designers achieved the difficult feat of spanning a tricky tween/teen age range, although the title will not likely appeal to any student beyond eighth grade. The book's only fault is that it assumes an intact nuclear family and supportive parents, which, statistically speaking, is not too likely—especially for a kid who finds herself in the midst of a move. This is a good book to hand to the otherwise well-adjusted kid whose only real issue is being new to a school. Reviewer: Rochelle Garfinkel

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781433810381
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Publication date:
09/15/2011
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
1,269,973
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 5.60(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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