New Making of a Cook: The Art, Techniques, and Science of Good Cooking

New Making of a Cook: The Art, Techniques, and Science of Good Cooking

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Overview

The Making of a Cook became an instant classic upon its publication in 1971. Since then much has changed in the way America cooks and The New Making of a Cook meets these changes head-on. This fully revised edition teaches every technique used in todays homes and professional kitchens, from julienning vegetables to roasting meats to steaming fish to baking bread. With years of experience teaching Americas top chefs how to cook, Madeleine knows what works and why.

Today's cooking is much more heart-healthy, and The New Making of a Cook is filled with low-fat cooking techniques, along with hundreds of recipes that extract maximum flavor from the least required amount of fat (though culinary indulgences still remain). In addition to techniques and recipes, The New Making of a Cook tells the important whys of cooking-why meats brown in the pan; why egg whites stiffen when they are beaten.

The New Making of a Cook is an extraordinary and indispensable reference from an extraordinary teacher. Completely rewritten for todays cook, it will become a classic all over again.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780688152543
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 11/28/1997
Pages: 1153
Product dimensions: 8.26(w) x 10.26(h) x 2.29(d)
Age Range: 8 Years

About the Author

Madeleine Kamman has been a four-star restaurateur, a PBS cooking show host, and co-founder and director of The School for American Chefs, a graduate program for professional chefs. She is the author of numerous cookbooks, and lives in St. Helena, California.

Read an Excerpt

Danish Holiday Almond Cake

This cake, a cousin to the French pain de gjnes, is truly delicious and a treat to have once in a while. Please respect scrupulously the egg sizes given here. The cake is so delicious by itself that any icing seems to damage rather than enhance its flavor. For a recipe of the same cake made with ground pistachios, see my book, Madeleine Kammans Savoie. To make petits fours, bake the cake in a 9 x 9 x 2-inch square cake pan.

Makes 3 dozen squares for petits fours, or 1 round 10-inch cake with 18 to 24 servings

1 cup plus 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon unsifted cake flour for the cake pan
Large pinch of salt
1 cup granulated sugar
1 1/2 ounces almond paste (not marzipan), finely grated
2 teaspoons orange flower water or 1 tablespoon kirsch
5 medium-size eggs
1 cup sifted cake flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder (optional)
Confectioners' sugar

Preheat the oven to 3250F. Butter the cake pan with the 1 tablespoon of butter and dust it with the single tablespoon of cake flour. Set the pan upside down and slam it once to remove all traces of excess flour.

In a large bowl, cream the remaining cup of butter until white, then add the sugar and almond paste together and beat until fluffy and white again, 2 to 3 minutes on medium-high speed. Turning the speed down to low, add the orange flower water, then 1 egg at a time. Beat again on medium-high speed after each addition until the batter returns to white foaminess. Finally, resift the cake flour mixed with the baking powder (if used) directly over the batter and fold into the batter. Turn into the prepared pan and bake 40 to 45 minutes. The cake is done whenit is golden brown and a metal skewer inserted into its center comes out dry and feeling hot when applied to the top of the hand.

Unmold immediately onto a rack and let cool completely before cutting. Trim off the edges if you desire petits fours and cut into as many 1 inch squares as you can manage. Dust with confectioners' sugar. If you prefer bringing the round cake to the table whole, put a decorative doily on it and dust with confectioners' sugar, then lift off the doily; its decorative pattern will be reproduced on the cake by the sugar.

Please do not freeze.

Copyright ) 1997 by Madeleine Kamman.

Recipe

Recipes from The New Making of a Cook

Butternut Squash Gratin

FFR -- 6 servings

2 medium-size butternut squash
2 tablespoons hazelnut oil plus extra as needed
1 cup heavy cream, scalded
1/2 cup dry Sercial Madeira
Salt
Pepper from the mill
1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts

Peel the squash and cut into enough 1/4-inch-thick slices to fill 3 cups. Heat the 2 tablespoons of hazelnut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the squash and cook gently on each side until golden; or, if you prefer, parboil the slices 3 to 4 minutes in lightly salted boiling water.

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Rub a 1 1/2-quart baking dish with the hazelnut oil and place a layer of squash in the bottom. Mix the cream and Madeira together and pour half of it over the slices. Season with salt and pepper, then add another layer of squash. Pour over the remaining cream mixture, then sprinkle the top with the crumbs and hazelnuts mixed together. Bake until the cream breaks into butter at the edges of the dish, about 1 hour.

Rich Polenta from the Italian Piedmont
Polenta Grassa Alla Piemontese

From the Italian side of the Alps and the little township of Morgex.

FFR -- 6 servings

4 heads escarole, washed and finely chopped
3 to 4 tablespoons unsalted butter or light olive oil as needed
2 large yellow onions, finely chopped
1 cup heavy cream
Once 4-ounce piece prosciutto, 1/4 inch thick
Salt
Pepper from the mill
2 cups stone-ground organic cornmeal
2 cups cold water or broth of your choice
6 cups boiling water or broth of your choice or half boiling water and half scalded hot milk
Freshly grated nutmeg
1/3 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
Eight 1/4-inch-thick slices Italian fontina cheese

Spin the greens as dry as possible. Heat 2 to 3 tablespoons of the chosen fat in a large sauteuse pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until golden. Add the escarole and cook over medium-low heat until reduced to 2 small cups. Add the cream and prosciutto, season with salt and pepper, and cook just a few minutes. Set aside.

Dissolve the cornmeal in the cold water; stirring constantly, add the slurry to the boiling water, as well as salt, pepper, and nutmeg to taste. Cook over medium-low heat until the spoon stands up straight in the polenta mixture, about 40 minutes. Add the Parmigiano cheese.

Butter a 2-quart dish with the remaining 1 tablespoon butter or oil. Add half of the hot polenta, spreading it out evenly over the bottom of the dish. Spread the escarole mixture on top, then spoon and spread the remainder of the polenta over the greens. Smooth well and top with the slices of fontina. Bake until the cheese has melted and starts to turn golden, about 15 minutes.

Danish Holiday Almond Cake

This cake, a cousin to the French pain de gênes, is truly delicious and a treat to have once in a while. Please respect scrupulously the egg sizes given here. The cake is so delicious by itself that any icing seems to damage rather than enhance its flavor. For a recipe of the same cake made with ground pistachios, see my book MADELEINE KAMMAN'S SAVOIE. To make petits fours, bake the cake in a 9 x 9 x 2-inch square cake pan.

FFR -- 3 Dozen Squares for Petits Fours, or 1 Round 10-inch Cake with 18 to 24 servings

1 cup pus 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon unsifted cake flour for the cake pan
Large pinch of salt
1 cup granulated sugar
10 1/2 ounces almond paste (not marzipan), finely grated
2 teaspoons orange flower water or 1 tablespoon kirsch
5 medium-size eggs
1 cup sifted cake flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder (optional)
Confectioners' sugar

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Butter the cake pan with the 1 tablespoon of butter and dust it with the single tablespoon of cake flour. Set the pan upside down and slam it once to remove all traces of excess flour.

In a large bowl, cream the remaining cup of butter until white, then add the sugar and almond paste together and beat until fluffy and white again, 2 to 3 minutes on medium-high speed. Turning the speed down to low, add the orange flower water, then 1 egg at a time. Beat again on medium-high speed after each addition until the batter returns to white foaminess. Finally, resift the cake flour mixed with the baking powder (if used) directly over the batter and fold into the batter. Turn into the prepared pan and bake 40 to 45 minutes. The cake is done when it is golden brown and a metal skewer inserted into its center comes out dry and feeling hot when applied to the top of the hand.

Unmold immediately onto a rack and let cool completely before cutting. Trim off the edges if you desire petit fours and cut into as many 1-inch squares as you can manage. Dust with confectioners' sugar. If you prefer bringing the round cake to the table whole, put a decorative doily on it and dust with confectioners' sugar, then lift off the doily; its decorative pattern will be reproduced on the cake by the sugar.

Please do not freeze.

Recipes from THE NEW MAKING OF A COOK, copyright © 1997 by Madeleine Kamman. Reprinted with permission from William Morrow and Company, Inc. All rights reserved.

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New Making of a Cook 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
BrianDewey on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I can't say I've learned much from this book yet. It's more intruiging than educational, at least so far.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have a library of over 200 cookbooks, and if I ever were forced to keep just 5, this would be one of them. I have the original 1971 and didn't think I needed to know any more, but couldn't resist buying a new edition - it is worth every penny. Madeleine has indeed 'made me a cook.' By giving an explanation of why things work and why things can go wrong, a cook truly understands successes as well as mistakes. I have also become more creative by explanations of technique, wonderful recipes, and encouraging words. This book makes a wonderful gift - over 1,000 pages from a teacher who really knows how to cook - and how to share her advice in an interesting and readable book.