The New Rules of Lifting for Women: Lift Like a Man, Look Like a Goddess

The New Rules of Lifting for Women: Lift Like a Man, Look Like a Goddess

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Overview

The New Rules of Lifting for Women: Lift Like a Man, Look Like a Goddess by Lou Schuler, Cassandra Forsythe, Alwyn Cosgrove

In The New Rules of Lifting for Women, authors Lou Schuler, Cassandra Forsythe and Alwyn Cosgrove present a comprehensive strength, conditioning and nutrition plan destined to revolutionize the way women work out. All the latest studies prove that strength training, not aerobics, provides the key to losing fat and building a fit, strong body. This book refutes the misconception that women will "bulk up" if they lift heavy weights. Nonsense! It's tough enough for men to pack on muscle, and they have much more of the hormone necessary to build muscle: natural testosterone. Muscles need to be strengthened to achieve a lean, healthy look. Properly conditioned muscles increase metabolism and promote weight loss -- it's that simple. The program demands that women put down the "Barbie" weights, step away from the treadmill and begin a strength and conditioning regime for the natural athlete in every woman. The New Rules of Lifting for Women will change the way women see fitness, nutrition and their own bodies.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781440685378
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/26/2008
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 30,383
File size: 3 MB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Lou Schuler is a National Magazine Award-winning journalist, a certified strength and conditioning specialist, the author of popular diet and strength-training books, and a dedicated blogger. He has written and edited Men's Fitness, Men's Health, Men's Health Muscle, Men's Journal, and other magazines. Alwyn Cosgrove is co-owner, with his wife Rachel, of Results Fitness in Newhall, California. He is a professional member of the National Academy of Sports Medicine and the American College of Sports Medicine, among other organizations, and is a frequent contributor to a variety of magazines, including Men's Health and Men's Fitness. Cassandra Forsythe, M.S., is a doctoral student at the University of Connecticut, studying exercise science and nutrition. She is an expert consultant for fitness and nutrition media, including Men's Health, Fitness Rx for Her, and Fitness Rx for Him.

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New Rules of Lifting for Women: Lift Like a Man, Look Like a Goddess 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 72 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Lift like a man, look like a Goddess" says the book. But is it true? I believe it is, and this book is right on the money. It is cleanly divided into three parts.

The first part discusses the similarities between men's and women's bodies as it pertains to weight lifting- and why they should train the same. I agree with the book on this point entirely. While women's muscles won't get as big as a man's from lifting weights, the stimulus to make a woman's muscle bigger and stronger is identical to that of a man's- overload the muscle with progressively heavier weights.

Part two, "You aren't what you don't eat", is the eating/diet section of the book. A lot of wisdom is also packed in here as the book gives the reader a lot of basic nutrition info, such as calorie needs, protein intake, etc. The reader is also introduced to the four "Ironclad Rules" which include: you must eat breakfast, you must eat a total of 5 meals and snacks a day, you must have a post-workout recovery shake on the days you lift, and you must have more calories on workout days than the other days. Meal plans are nicely laid out for the reader in this section as well.

Lastly comes part three, "Resistance is vital." Of course this is the section that discusses the workout routines and the exercises. Without going into details, you work out 2-3 times a week, and the workouts are divided in 7 stages (each with a certain goal) which roughly give you 6 months worth of workouts- which I might add, are all highly detailed in the book. Pictures of warm-up exercises and the resistance exercises are included and very easy to follow. Weight lifting exercises are nothing crazy, with a lot of them being sensible, basic exercises such as squats, deadlifts, and various presses.

As a trainer, I found this to be a very sensible weight lifting book for women. Yes it does invovlve some work, but then again that is the only way to make a muscle stronger, whether you're a man or a woman- which is the whole point of the book. Based on a lot of sound science, I give it two thumbs up for a very helpful, effective, and "doable" book. Also recommend Treat Your Own Rotator Cuff for readers who have a shoulder problem that interferes with their training.
Goober98 More than 1 year ago
I have recently returned to a "normal" BMI after about 6 months of a calorie-restricted diet and losing about 20 pounds, but I found my figure to be less athletic than I would prefer. I had been exercising 4-5 times per week doing pilates, yoga, eliptical machine, hip-hop and dance classes, and some weight classes at the gym as well, but I was ready for something more serious to build some muscles (which I thought were hiding under my fat, but sadly were just not there). This book was EXACTLY what I needed to make a focused weight-training effort. I have noticed a difference after just one week of the program Note: I am a vegetarian, and this nutrition program calls for a high-protein diet. I am struggling with getting all the protein that is recommended, but I am doing the best I can. Also, this program is not for women who have a lot (more than 15 pounds) of weight to lose. Almost every example he gives in the book is of a "normal-sized" woman who can gain muscle and lose fat from the program.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book, well written and straight forward. I started the plan about a month ago and I am noticing a difference in my muscles. I highly recommend this book to women who are unsure of what workouts to do to see results. I had been working out for 2 years prior lifting as the author calls, barbie weights. The workouts take about 30 minutes to complete 2-3 times a week and are split into several phases. However, if you sincerely plan to do the workouts buy the hard copy. The author provides the phases and what pages the workouts are on but the nook pages DO NOT match. Since the workouts are specific you will want to have the correct pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is well written and the advice is sound throughout yet there is nothing significantly different or new here. Women lifting like a man is far from a new idea, that concept has been around for years. Eating 5-6 meals per day, again, not a new idea but sound advice. The layout of training program is varied in how it is excecuted and not working the smaller muscles alone is the only real difference I could find. For the beginner or someone with a lot of weight to lose this book would be confusing and frustrating. If you are a beginner to weight training or have a lot of weight to lose I would recommend Body for Life. It is effective, motivating, easy to follow, and makes no distinction between men and women either. If you have followed the Body for Life program you will see much of the same advice given is also in this book. Basically the book is solid and gives you a different look at the same information already out there. It is like a deck of cards, even when shuffled, they are still the same cards just in a different place.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a 45 yr old middle aged woman. I haven't worked out seriously in years. And, I love this program. Ladies, it is all laid out for you. Every detail of the program is there. It is easy to follow and effective. The only caveat is that it isn't easy, but getting real results never is. I've been working hard for a few weeks now. Both my strength and mobility are improving greatly, making everyday tasks easier. I also look and feel better. I haven't lost a ton of fat quickly, but more gradually. This is the start of being fit for life, not just looking good. This book is empowering to women and should be on everyone's fitness shelf. Thank you Mr. Shuler and Mr Cosgrove.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think many people misunderstand the purpose of the program presented in this book. It is not designed for people with a lot of weight to lose; it is more for people who are already in shape or are within 20 lbs of their goal weight. The author's ideas may not necessarily be new, but he is providing background and solid reasoning for the program presented. The charts may be confusing at first, but if you look at the example it will make sense. If you already have an understanding of weight lifting, you may not even need to read the author's commentary- just skip straight to the program. Each workout is between 30-60 minutes, which I find very reasonable. I started NROLFW as a beginning weight-lifter and have not had any difficulty following it. I highly recommend this book to anyone; it is very helpful because everything is laid out for you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got this book because I needed to cross-train as a runner, and read that gaining muscle would make me stronger as a runner. As a weight-lifting novice, I found the workouts in this book to be very quick, simple, uncomplicated and effective. Each exercise is described in detail, and there are a lot of photographs illustrating them, which is a great help to the novice lifter. I did have some trouble initially grasping the order of the Phase 1 program exercise chart, but once I got it all sorted out, it was a piece of cake. The entire book is laid out in a very positive, encouraging manner which really helped me get over the 'intimidation factor' of the weight room. I strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in learning to lift weights!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Really have enjoyed this book. Written by a man, but specifically for women. He makes good points,and explains when workouts should differ for the sexes and were they should be the same. The science is there, but written in a relateable manner, without confusing the reader with technical jargon. The diet plan, and work out plan in the back are both quite well done, although the Stage 1 work out graph is slightly confusing. I took a photo of the graph with my phone and take it with me to the gym as a quick reference. Great book, if you're female, are tired of all this "Do Cardio til you look like Twiggy" media junk, then this book is for you. Women who lift weights (not body building, this is a book about health and fitness and fatloss using weight lifting) finally open up the entire gym. No more of that intimidation from half of the weights. It's fantastic. Plus...all those studly dudes bench pressing stuff? They will totally help you out and you get loads of gym cred (regardless of starting physical shape) by trying out the free weights.
Gunner_Girl83 More than 1 year ago
If you are new to lifting, this book is definately for you. The programs start out not using a lot of the weight machines or free weights. It slowly introduces you to more exercises.
rqb987 More than 1 year ago
Highly recommend it for anyone looking to add strenght training to their workout.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Read for reference
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book entertaining. The author is funny and keeps things informational without being textbook- like boring. The information was useful, although I already knew most of the topics he covered just from researching online. The book includes an easy to stick to meal plan, and urges you to eat more then to cut foods out! I had a very, very hard time understanding the workout plans he provides. The charts are nearly impossible to figure out, and he does not explain them well AT ALL. I still don't think I'm doing the routine correctly, which is the main reason I bought this book. If it weren't for the pictures and explanations of each exercise, I would be completely lost. I am disappointed that the plans weren't written clearer.
NCReaderGirl More than 1 year ago
Book Review: If you are a woman who has either never set foot into the big-boys part of the gym aka the weight room, or even if you are a semi-experienced lifter who has been searching for a way to get out of a rut or even try and learn something new then this program is definitely for you! I began the program after working out on weight machines, free weights, cable towers, etc for months with no real progress – I’d heard of the book and the program but never took the initiative to try and do more “homework” I guess if you will into it. Finally, earlier this year I picked-up the book and jumped right in, reading the book cover-to-cover. It’s very well written and easy to follow and understand, Lou doesn’t talk down to the reader, nor does he outline the program in such a way that someone who does not have a basic fitness vocabulary can’t follow. Allwyn then has designed an amazing workout program that gradually increases in difficulty while forcing you outside of your comfort zone. Cassandra also outlines how to calculate macros and get the right nutrition to match-up with the program. A very well rounded book, 5 out of 5 stars for the book Program Review: I am one, yes ONE workout away from being done with this 7-phase program and I’ve had my share of frustrations with it: The Obsession with PLANKS! If you are like me and have some sort of back-injury then you physically cannot do planks without putting your back out of commission for days on end- AND there’s no substitute for them outlined, just either A) Don’t do it and miss that aspect of the program or B) do this or that variation…um yeah. I gave it my all, 120% to try and do the planks, when it came to a workout requiring 3-Sets of 2-Min planks (yes you read that right, 6 Full Mins of Planking), I tried, I did them, and then subsequently couldn’t walk for four days following without my back crying out…ugh…needless to say I didn’t do anymore after that, I subbed in Prone Jack-Knifes instead Push-ups – the number of push-ups we are asked to do is WOW! There’s use for it, I get that, and there’s a not of ways they can help, But geez! The lack of arm-specific work, there’s a TON (I mean literally the whole program is nothing but) of full-body work, but nothing that works biceps/triceps specifically – I guess those planks and push-ups are meant to hit those areas. BUT on the flip-side I did see some advantages, I got stronger, leaner, and more physically defined as time went on. I became more self-aware and more aware of what I was eating. I found lifting became my main source of calm, if I felt my anxieties rising a trip to the gym and one of these workouts would bring me back down level again. I say lifting is a blessing for my soul! I am in the process of reading the most recent book released by these authors, Strong, and am finding more planks and/or variations on them and I am wondering if I’ve wasted $30 on a program I won’t be able to do…ugh So all in all 3 out of 5 stars for the program, I’ve loved it, but the authors really need to find a way to do more than just Push-ups and Planks for arm/back/core work because HELLO not everyone can do these things!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great if you're new to weight lifting. The first few pages, the author sounds like he's talking down to women. However, when you read a little more he talks about how he's disgusted with many magazines (like Shape) and women's fitness books and how they create workout plans that are very demeaning for women. Typical workouts that have us lifting a whopping five pounds instead of giving us something we can actually work with. So it's more of a rant than talking down to women. I give the workout parts five stars. I'm giving this book three stars because of the nutrition part. With all of the food documentaries I've watched a nutrition books I've read, I find the nutrition plan of this book to be full of dairy and processed foods. I people should be eating whole foods (nothing processed, refined, antibiotics, hormones, etc) or plant-based diets. If following a plant-based diet, then you wouldn't eat meat, dairy or animal products. The difference between this and vegan is that vegans are able to consume processed and artificial foods, plant-based doesn't. I don't like that this book endorses whey protein and casein, most of the recipes include dairy products, and they have "acceptable" fast food from Wendy's, Subway, and McDonald's....which is pretty disappointing because the whole idea is to avoid those places. So I would recommend this book to learn more about weight training and how to properly calculate calories needed, I just don't recommend following the nutrition plan they have.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book!  The author maps out a plan to help anyone succeed in getting stronger and fitter.  This is NOT about quickly losing weight - I don't know how some folks got that idea.  At one time there was a message board you could ask questions on, but that may be defunct now.  There are also many videos on the web if you want to see what the excercises look like before you start.  I would not recommend this as an e-book - it's not for reading, its a plan of action!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's been eight months and I'm still incredibly happy I read this book. It was a quick read - I read it cover to cover in a couple days - and it completely changed the way I think about training. Since starting the program, I've lost 20 pounds of body fat without losing a pound of muscle. I tell all my friends to ditch their cardio for muscles (tongue and cheek of course). And I'm less stressed about body weight and image because I know how it all works. Huge thanks to the authors! 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not a very useful resource disappointed with book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
momboteri More than 1 year ago
Lou is a fantastic writer... straightforward and yet humorous. Easy to understand as well (and that's saying alot given some of the topics he presents in this book). Alwyn's routines are solid and effective. Haven't tried Cassandra's recipes yet, but they sound yummy and are definitely healthy. As a personal trainer AND as a woman who likes to lift weights, I found this book to be extremely helpful on both a personal level and in regards to instructing clients. I can't say enough good things about it. GET THIS BOOK! : )
Anonymous More than 1 year ago