The Night Listener

The Night Listener

by Armistead Maupin
3.7 31

Audiobook(Cassette - Unabridged, 7 Cassettes)

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Overview

The Night Listener by Armistead Maupin

After an absence of eight years, Armistead Maupin returns with the tale of Gabriel Noone, a writer whose cult-hit radio serial "Noone at Night" has brought him into the homes of millions. Noone is in the midst of a painful separation from his lover of 10 years when a publisher sends him proofs of a remarkable book: the memoir of an ailing 13-year-old boy who suffered horrific sexual abuse at the hands of his parents.

Now living with his adoptive mother, Donna, Pete Lomax is not only a brave and gifted diarist but a devoted listener of Noone's show. When Noone phones the boy to offer encouragement, it soon becomes clear that Pete sees in this heartsick middle-aged storyteller the loving father he's always wanted. Thus begins an extraordinary friendship that only grows deeper as the boy's health deteriorates, freeing Noone to unlock his innermost feelings.

Then, out of the blue, troubling new questions arise, exploding Noone's comfortable assumptions and causing his ordered existence to spin wildly out to control. As he walks a line between truth and illusion, he is finally forced to confront all of his relationships—familial, romantic, and erotic.

As complex and hypnotically engrossing as the best of mysteries, The Night Listener is an astonishing tour de force that will move and challenge Maupin's readers as never before.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780694521449
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 10/28/2000
Edition description: Unabridged, 7 Cassettes
Pages: 9
Product dimensions: 4.17(w) x 6.20(h) x 2.67(d)

About the Author

Armistead Maupin is the author of the nine-volume Tales of the City series, which includes Tales of the City, More Tales of the City, Further Tales of the City, Babycakes, Significant Others, Sure of You, Michael Tolliver Lives, Mary Ann in Autumn, and now The Days of Anna Madrigal. Maupin's other novels include Maybe the Moon and The Night Listener. Maupin was the 2012 recipient of the Lambda Literary Foundation's Pioneer Award. He lives in San Francisco with his husband, the photographer Christopher Turner.

Hometown:

San Francisco, California

Date of Birth:

May 13, 1944

Place of Birth:

Washington, D.C.

Education:

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Night Listener 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Qtbaby615 More than 1 year ago
It started off with the promise of a good story and ended with much less.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The cover suggests that this novel is about an abused boy, dying from AIDS, who befriends a radio personality that he's never met, and that the plot twists will keep you enthralled. Unfortunately, that story only accounts for about 25% of the book. The rest is about the narrator's life as a gay man, including several graphic descriptions of sexual acts. If that interests you, buy the book. If, however, the ostensible plot attracts you (and it's actually a very interesing story), borrow the book and read the real-life account at the back. It's only about thirty pages, and it's much better than the novelized version.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book brings to mind a shell game or the puzzle of opening a box only to find a smaller box, followed by successive smaller and smaller boxes. The story follows the thoughts, insecurites and sexual exploits of a moody gay man. Staying with the book page after page in order to garner the outcome of a teenage radio listener with aids finds the reader opening the last small box at the end only to find it empty. The story finally (mercifully) ends abruptly and you realize that you were duped by the author. The carrot (teenage boy plotline) was merely dangled to keep the reader from closing the book sooner. An implied promise that the storyline contains something besides the gay character and the author on a soapbox.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Refreshingly, now and then a book reminds us what the art of telling stories is all about. Maupin's success in the field of novel birthing does just that ...and so very much more. THE NIGHT LISTENER is a FINE mystery/love story/reminiscence and as such it is difficult to stop turning the pages, so involved is the unwinding of the tale. But to my eyes and mind this book is so much more than just a well-told tale complete with allegory and metaphor. This book studies the achingly long, ever-present clash of father/son relationships. Whether concocted as an adoptive father in search of a needy youth as in this book, or just examining the way all men are challenged by this complicated love/hate, approach/avoid, mimic/revolt interaction we live through as sons and subsequently as fathers, Maupin serves us a study of one of the core dilemmas we face. And as for the structure of this immensely rewarding novel, Maupin has given us the choices to determine our own resolutions about his beautifully drawn characters. In the early pages of the book he admits that his way of relating stories is always altered by flights of fancy, or 'bejeweling an elephant' that his tale takes us on such a kaleidoscopic ride is enhanced by his starting out with this sort of honesty. And in truth, isn't this the way we all electively distort history as we relate it.... to fulfill our hope and fantasies of how we actually exist? Grady Harp
Guest More than 1 year ago
Premise was enticing so I bought it. Started not liking it about halfway through but kept going expecting it would all come together (based on reviews of the book). Felt like I'd wasted my time when I finished. Never read anything by him before and, after this, never will again. Creepy too, and not in a good way.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was very good book. It was worth of buying it, the only thing that dissapointed me it was the ending. I wanted to know more about what happened latter, was that boy really a fiction?? I think the ending was a litle weak, but overall i enjoyed this book. Great buy!!!
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
While the movie version of The Night Listener certainly didn't set any box office records, for this listener the audio rates high largely because of the affecting narration provided by author Armistead Maupin. This is a poignant story of a man who feels lost and unloved, and Maupin reads it with insight, illuminating the fears and doubts that possess protagonist Gabriel Noone. Gabriel comes to life at night - he's a Manhattan based late hours radio host, Noone At Night. He's also a gay man who has broken up with his partner, Jess. After finding himself evidently free of the AIDS virus Jess wants more in life than he is finding with Gabriel. While Gabriel only wanted Jess. Especially vulnerable due to an abusive father who publicly ridiculed him and would never recognize his homosexuality, Gabriel is depressed and feels useless. He seeks to assuage that feeling by connecting with a young fan, Pete Lomax, who lives in Wisconsin. Pete has suffered as much or more than Gabriel at the hands of physically abusive parents, and now in a struggle with AIDS. The two, Gabriel and Pete, quickly develop a warm, supportive father/son relationship all by telephone. Gabriel, of course, again feels needed. Eventually, Gabriel decides to go to Wisconsin to see Pete. What he finds there is totally unexpected. Those who enjoyed Tales of the City will once again find themselves enthralled by Maupin's prose. His voice is icing on the cake. - Gail Cooke
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having never read a Maupin novel before, I approached this one without expectations. I enjoyed it completely, completing it in three sittings. A page turner! Caution: there is adult language and content. Awesome read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Recommended by an old high school friend (we are about to turn 50...), Night Listener proved to be a gem. Not just a page turner, either, though it certainly is that. Maupin has observant insights that reminded me why I so enjoyed his Tales of the City series years ago.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book, he takes thru every emotion that you can think that possible one person could handle. Highly recommend this book,can't wait for his next one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The only bad thing about this book is that it ended. I love a book that makes me think. I can't stop thinking about all the clues that led the the various surprises at the end. I recommend this to anyone who likes a story with a twist.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! Maupin did a wonderful job of telling this tale. The twists and turns kept coming the entire way throughout the book and I found myself unable to put it down. I read the Tales of the City series several years ago because they were recommended by a friend of mine back east. He knew I was relocating to San Francisco and thought I would enjoy the stories...and boy did I ever! I have to admit I wasn't able to really get into Maupin's 'Maybe the Moon' and didn't know whether or not I would enjoy 'The Night Listener.' I'm SO glad that I gave it a chance or I would have missed out on what has turned out to be one of my favorite books ever! Thanks Maupin...and keep the stories coming..I'm hungry for more more more! In fact, I think I'm going to go and try to read 'Maybe the Moon' again!
Guest More than 1 year ago
LOVE HIS WORK, BUT THIS WAS A DISAPPOINTMENT, HOPE THINGS WILL IMPROVE
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought Night Listener, because I will read anything written by A.Maupin. If you are an avid fan, this will disappoint. Though I believe it not to be his best, I hope he continues to create. I will definitely give him 1, 2, 3, 4, or even 5 chances to redeem himself. If Maupin has been recommended to you, start with the 'City' books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
.In 1993 either Paul Monette or Armistead Maupin (perhaps in concert) concocted a book claiming to be the true autobiography of an abused, aids-inflicted young teen-ager named, allegedly, Tony Johnson. The book was named ' A Rock and a Hard Place.' The book jacket came garlanded with ribbons of praise from confederates such as Fred Rogers, Marva Collins,and (of course) Armistead Maupin. Unfortunately, not a single word in the book was true. The putative author, despite extensive investigation on my part, was uncovered by no-one who had ever seen the bogus rascal, not even his agent, or his 'very best friend,' Paul Monette. The book was obviously a cruel hoax written for unknown reasons, perhaps pecuniary or social. The Pirandellian denouement is that Maupin has now produced a novel which recapitulates my role in trying to unmask the fraud, and confesses at the end that the Tony Johnson book was a hoax. So, what we have here, in The Silent Listener, is a novel claimed to be fictional based on an autobiography claimed to be true, which was, in fact, entirely fictional. Those of you out there tempted to buy the book may not wish to entrust yourself to the manipulation of such a deceitful writer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I tried reading 'Tales' and never really could get into it. But this one is different. When I laughed out loud, in the store on page 2, I knew I had to own this book. It was like reading about people I know.